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"Hurrah for Jackson." The "hurrah for Jackson," once so familiar to this country, has been revived with an enthusiasm that bids fair to equal the uproar which the name of "Old Hickory" used to rouse. We are told that in his own camp, he cannot make his appearance without being followed by that stirring hurrah from one end of the line to the other. What a lion they would make of him, if he were a Yankee hero! By this time the printshops would be full of his likenesses, and Harper would have a minute account of his origin, history, appearance and habits. We must confess that we feel some curiosity ourselves to know something more of the life and appearance of "Old Stone- wall," of whom all we know at present is that he was formerly a professor in the Virginia Military Institute, is a little over the madium height, spare and thin, with dark hair and beard cut short, and has an accentric habit of fighting Yankees when he meets them.
Ann Jackson (search for this): article 6
"Hurrah for Jackson." The "hurrah for Jackson," once so familiar to this country, has been revived with an enthusiasm that bids fair to equal the uproar which the name of "Old Hickory" used to rouse. We are told that in his own camp, he cannot make his appearance without being followed by that stirring hurrah from one end of the line to the other. What a lion they would make of him, if he were a Yankee hero! By this time the printshops would be full of his likenesses, and Harper would Jackson," once so familiar to this country, has been revived with an enthusiasm that bids fair to equal the uproar which the name of "Old Hickory" used to rouse. We are told that in his own camp, he cannot make his appearance without being followed by that stirring hurrah from one end of the line to the other. What a lion they would make of him, if he were a Yankee hero! By this time the printshops would be full of his likenesses, and Harper would have a minute account of his origin, history, appearance and habits. We must confess that we feel some curiosity ourselves to know something more of the life and appearance of "Old Stone- wall," of whom all we know at present is that he was formerly a professor in the Virginia Military Institute, is a little over the madium height, spare and thin, with dark hair and beard cut short, and has an accentric habit of fighting Yankees when he meets them.