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Longstreet (search for this): article 1
matter of impossibility. Towards nine A. M. on Saturday we observed large bodies of troops of Longstreet's division moving towards, and on the Williamsburg road, with bands in full blast, colors flyiter regiment traversed the ground seems even now almost a problem. Yet, onward, onward passed Longstreet's division towards the point of attack; and although everything seemed unusually quiet there wd as skirmishers on the right and left of the road, which were soon replaced by the arrival of Longstreet's veterans. Between 11and 12 A. M., the 28th Georgia and 2d Mississippi were deployed as skirds, were pouring vollies upon them. At about this time, 1 P. M., some other reinforcements of Longstreet's corps arriving turned the tide of battle for a time, but not permanently.--Among others St. rear, while a large force was placed near by in reserve.--President Davis, General Lee, Smith, Longstreet, Stuart, and other commanding Generals, were upon the ground at this point, showing that it wa
he Williamsburg road, near the seven mile post, on the York River Railroad, but Oddaway's battery and a brigade in waiting received their advance with such ardor that, without any preliminary, the Tennesseeans and others throw themselves upon the Federals, drove in their skirmisher, attacked the main force, and up to the middle in water assailed the battery before them, and took it with the bayonet. The fighting in this direction was not of long duration, but of great intensity and noise, Imboden's (or Oddaway's) field pieces being worked with remarkable precision and celerity, expediting the enemy's retreat within a short time. The enthusiasm of the men on the left of the Williamsburg road could not be restrained. Short after shout rent the air, and it did not even subside when actually engaged themselves late in the evening; for, although not personally with them, we could well mark their successful advance by the dying sounds of their wild shouts in the woods. Thus, then, when
entire camp, with great supplies, and drove the foe two miles beyond their encampment of the morning. The greatest and hottest fire was about 4 P. M., when Latham's and Carter's batteries got into action, supported by the 4th and 5th South Carolina, 1st Virginia, 12th Mississippi, and other regiments. Having many valuables in camp, and it being well provided with tents, provisions, (including 100 bbls. of whiskey,) they made a terrific effort to retrieve the fortunes of the day, and Gen. Casey, their commander, moved up every available man to support or cover his flying columns. Tents, provisions, guns, ambulances, wagons, spars horses, and, in fact, everything stationed on the Williamsburg road, fell into our hands, and regiment after regiment of the enemy retreated to the Chickahominy faster than every witnessed before by old campaigners, leaving large numbers of killed and wounded to the fortunes of war. Beaten and driven in disgrace from their camp and earthworks on the Wil
k; and although everything seemed unusually quiet there was a peculiar stare and rumbling in the woods and on the road, (some six miles, and in the woods fronting Barker's plantation,) which denoted that the enemy were unusually active and anticipated our advance. Between 9 and 10 A. M., a part of Hill's division were deploye havoc by their flanking fire that the enemy precipitately fell back upon their unfinished breastwork in, and commanding the entrance to, the extensive grounds of Barker's farm. This breastwork, however, is but one of a chain of similar earthworks, which the invaders have erected this side of the Chickahominy stream, and, runningthough the mud baffled human industry, patience, and perseverance, some piece of the Lynchburg (we believe Latham's) Battery got into position, at the entrance to Barker's farm, and played such havoc that the foe deserted their four large brass howitzers, unable to reply. But as the enemy's whole brigade-camp (tents and all) were
st as discovered. Nothing daunted at the immense show and numbers of the foe, notwithstanding our artillery, from the nature of the roads and ground, was incapable of advancing, our infantry appeared upon their flanks, regiment after regiment, drove them from their hiding places, captured their guns, fortifications, and entire camp, with great supplies, and drove the foe two miles beyond their encampment of the morning. The greatest and hottest fire was about 4 P. M., when Latham's and Carter's batteries got into action, supported by the 4th and 5th South Carolina, 1st Virginia, 12th Mississippi, and other regiments. Having many valuables in camp, and it being well provided with tents, provisions, (including 100 bbls. of whiskey,) they made a terrific effort to retrieve the fortunes of the day, and Gen. Casey, their commander, moved up every available man to support or cover his flying columns. Tents, provisions, guns, ambulances, wagons, spars horses, and, in fact, everything
Pettigrew (search for this): article 1
particularly active with artillery and accurately shelled the ambulance train on the York River road. Operations along the line yesterday, were not of very important nature, the enemy being intent upon preparing for their main attack to-day, (Monday.) We are sorry to say that our officers suffered severely in the two days operations, and among others we would add that Gen. Garland had three horses shot under him, and was severely hurt before relinquishing his command in the field. Gen. Pettigrew was killed, Col Lomax, (3rd Ala.,) Col. Hatton, (7th Tenn,) and others, and as to the number of subordinate officers the list is a long and fearful one. Time and space precludes the possibility of further details — to-day is big with Fate! may Providence aid us in our cause, and may historians yet chronicle a second Marathon. Later in the evening the enemy appeared in force near the battle field of the morning which was then held by our men. Gen. Mahone's brigade still occupied th
rp', Crutchfield, slightly in hand; sergeant Bartley slightly in leg. Company D.--Joseph Lewry, in knee.; E. R. Walker, slightly in leg; T Burton, slightly in hand. Company E.--B. W. Brown, in finger; A Legg, slightly in back; R H Parker, severely in arm. Company F.--H. A. Sims, severely in arm; H Shifflott, badly in head; Reuben Estas severely in leg; John C. Whert, slightly in shoulder; Marcelius Kennedy, slightly in the neck; Lieut J M Deane, in finger. Company I.--E M Wolfe, in finger. Company E.--Wm Hill, mortally in abdomen; Wm Hurt, severely in abdomen. Fourth North Carolina State Troops.--This regiment was in the severe engagement on Saturday, and lost many officers and men. It went into the fight under the leadership of its Colonel, G. B. Anderson. We append the following partial list of the casualties occurring amongst the officers of the regiment: Lieut. White, company C, of Iredell, killed; Captain Wood, company B, wounded in hip; Dr. Sh
nd forty horses disabled. The 1st Lieutenant, Dickenson, had his leg broken. Captain Dearing is a brave and efficient young officer, and won his spurs on this occasion. One of the batteries captured was the "Empire Battery" of New York, Capt. Miller. The guns were new, brass field pieces, known as the Napoleon gun, made by the American manufacturing company. The horses were all killed, but the pieces have been turned over to Capt Miller of the Washington Artillery. Col. D. O. GodwiCapt Miller of the Washington Artillery. Col. D. O. Godwin, of the 9th Virginia, was severely wounded. The corps was badly used up. The 12th Virginia and the 3d Alabama charged a battery and drove the Yankees from it. The 12th and 6th Alabama took a battery of ten pieces. The 1st Virginia and 4th North Carolina charged a battery and drove the enemy out. The 9th Virginia also suffered much. The Colonel of the 11th Alabama is reported killed. Among the sad casualties of the day may be mentioned one peculiarly touching.--Mr. Richard Yeadon, of
James Brown (search for this): article 1
ac on the field, in readiness for the events of to-day. Of course it is impossible at this time to chronicle but a small portion of the casualties and incidents. We give such as we have been able to obtain. The 12th Virginia and the 3d Alabama behaved nobly. Both regiment were cut up badly. The Richmond Grays lost two killed and five wounded and missing. Probably no regiment suffered more than the 3d Alabama. Besides Col. Lomax, Adjutant Johnston, Capt Mays, Capt. Phelan, and Lieut. James Brown, were killed, and Captain Ready, Capt Robinson, Lieut Witherspoon, Lieut. Gardner, Lieut Partridge were wounded. These casualties were among the officers alone. The slaughter among the privates was terrific. The Lynchburg Artillery, formerly known as Latham's battery, now commanded by Captain James Dearing, did good service in the fight. The men fought bravely and laid many a Yankee upon the ground. Captain Dearing entered with thirty-four cannoneers, and had nineteen wounded.
ble order, until fresh troops could be brought to bear upon the hordes of Pennsylvanians, who, in thousands, were pouring vollies upon them. At about this time, 1 P. M., some other reinforcements of Longstreet's corps arriving turned the tide of battle for a time, but not permanently.--Among others St. Paul's (La) battalion, (three companies) appeared upon the scene, and looking to where the fire was hottest, dashed into the enemy in French style with the bayonet, and with their watch word "Butler" upon their lips, drove everything before them, attacking odds in every instance, and not satisfying their vengeance until almost decimated. Our artillery at this juncture came into play, and although the mud baffled human industry, patience, and perseverance, some piece of the Lynchburg (we believe Latham's) Battery got into position, at the entrance to Barker's farm, and played such havoc that the foe deserted their four large brass howitzers, unable to reply. But as the enemy's whol
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