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ed upon the field, and among them the body of the lamented Colonel Lomax. An omnibus was sent out to get as many as possible, but this was captured by the enemy.--The Yankees advanced to the edge of a piece of woods, within about one thousand yards of our line, where they halted and remained at dusk. Gen Mahone's brigade was soon reinforced by several brigades which were drawn up a short distance in its rear, while a large force was placed near by in reserve.--President Davis, General Lee, Smith, Longstreet, Stuart, and other commanding Generals, were upon the ground at this point, showing that it was an important position in the affairs of the day. Thus matters stood at sundown. As no further attack was anticipated during the night, our troops prepared to bivouac on the field, in readiness for the events of to-day. Of course it is impossible at this time to chronicle but a small portion of the casualties and incidents. We give such as we have been able to obtain. The 12th V
he events of to-day. Of course it is impossible at this time to chronicle but a small portion of the casualties and incidents. We give such as we have been able to obtain. The 12th Virginia and the 3d Alabama behaved nobly. Both regiment were cut up badly. The Richmond Grays lost two killed and five wounded and missing. Probably no regiment suffered more than the 3d Alabama. Besides Col. Lomax, Adjutant Johnston, Capt Mays, Capt. Phelan, and Lieut. James Brown, were killed, and Captain Ready, Capt Robinson, Lieut Witherspoon, Lieut. Gardner, Lieut Partridge were wounded. These casualties were among the officers alone. The slaughter among the privates was terrific. The Lynchburg Artillery, formerly known as Latham's battery, now commanded by Captain James Dearing, did good service in the fight. The men fought bravely and laid many a Yankee upon the ground. Captain Dearing entered with thirty-four cannoneers, and had nineteen wounded. He also had between thirty and fo
A. Sydney Johnston (search for this): article 1
d during the night, our troops prepared to bivouac on the field, in readiness for the events of to-day. Of course it is impossible at this time to chronicle but a small portion of the casualties and incidents. We give such as we have been able to obtain. The 12th Virginia and the 3d Alabama behaved nobly. Both regiment were cut up badly. The Richmond Grays lost two killed and five wounded and missing. Probably no regiment suffered more than the 3d Alabama. Besides Col. Lomax, Adjutant Johnston, Capt Mays, Capt. Phelan, and Lieut. James Brown, were killed, and Captain Ready, Capt Robinson, Lieut Witherspoon, Lieut. Gardner, Lieut Partridge were wounded. These casualties were among the officers alone. The slaughter among the privates was terrific. The Lynchburg Artillery, formerly known as Latham's battery, now commanded by Captain James Dearing, did good service in the fight. The men fought bravely and laid many a Yankee upon the ground. Captain Dearing entered with
ops prepared to bivouac on the field, in readiness for the events of to-day. Of course it is impossible at this time to chronicle but a small portion of the casualties and incidents. We give such as we have been able to obtain. The 12th Virginia and the 3d Alabama behaved nobly. Both regiment were cut up badly. The Richmond Grays lost two killed and five wounded and missing. Probably no regiment suffered more than the 3d Alabama. Besides Col. Lomax, Adjutant Johnston, Capt Mays, Capt. Phelan, and Lieut. James Brown, were killed, and Captain Ready, Capt Robinson, Lieut Witherspoon, Lieut. Gardner, Lieut Partridge were wounded. These casualties were among the officers alone. The slaughter among the privates was terrific. The Lynchburg Artillery, formerly known as Latham's battery, now commanded by Captain James Dearing, did good service in the fight. The men fought bravely and laid many a Yankee upon the ground. Captain Dearing entered with thirty-four cannoneers, and
Richard Yeadon (search for this): article 1
and 4th North Carolina charged a battery and drove the enemy out. The 9th Virginia also suffered much. The Colonel of the 11th Alabama is reported killed. Among the sad casualties of the day may be mentioned one peculiarly touching.--Mr. Richard Yeadon, of Charleston, South Carolina, at the earnest solicitation of his nephew and adopted son, Richard Yeadon, Jr. came here to chronicle the greatest battle of the war, but we regret to say that he had to chronicle the death of the gallant youRichard Yeadon, Jr. came here to chronicle the greatest battle of the war, but we regret to say that he had to chronicle the death of the gallant youth. He was killed, yesterday afternoon, between five and six o'clock, (about an hour and a half after Mr. Y. had taken leave of him, near the scene of his death.) while bravely charging a battery of the enemy, concealed in a thicket, a ball passing through his head and he dying instantly. Three others of his company, (the Washington Light Infantry, Hampton Legion,) bit the dust at the same time, and many more were wounded, and the enemy having repulsed the attacking party are in possession of
rely in arm. Company F.--H. A. Sims, severely in arm; H Shifflott, badly in head; Reuben Estas severely in leg; John C. Whert, slightly in shoulder; Marcelius Kennedy, slightly in the neck; Lieut J M Deane, in finger. Company I.--E M Wolfe, in finger. Company E.--Wm Hill, mortally in abdomen; Wm Hurt, severely in abdomen. Fourth North Carolina State Troops.--This regiment was in the severe engagement on Saturday, and lost many officers and men. It went into the fight under the leadership of its Colonel, G. B. Anderson. We append the following partial list of the casualties occurring amongst the officers of the regiment: Lieut. White, company C, of Iredell, killed; Captain Wood, company B, wounded in hip; Dr. Shevin, of company B, Killed; E. Thomas, company F, wounded in arm; John Waddell, company C, wounded in arm; Color bearer of regiment, killed; Adjutant of regiment, killed; Captain Simonton, Iredell Blues, killed; Lieut. McCrory, Iredell Blues, killed.
erely in arm. Company F.--H. A. Sims, severely in arm; H Shifflott, badly in head; Reuben Estas severely in leg; John C. Whert, slightly in shoulder; Marcelius Kennedy, slightly in the neck; Lieut J M Deane, in finger. Company I.--E M Wolfe, in finger. Company E.--Wm Hill, mortally in abdomen; Wm Hurt, severely in abdomen. Fourth North Carolina State Troops.--This regiment was in the severe engagement on Saturday, and lost many officers and men. It went into the fight under the leadership of its Colonel, G. B. Anderson. We append the following partial list of the casualties occurring amongst the officers of the regiment: Lieut. White, company C, of Iredell, killed; Captain Wood, company B, wounded in hip; Dr. Shevin, of company B, Killed; E. Thomas, company F, wounded in arm; John Waddell, company C, wounded in arm; Color bearer of regiment, killed; Adjutant of regiment, killed; Captain Simonton, Iredell Blues, killed; Lieut. McCrory, Iredell Blues, killed.
f killed and wounded to the fortunes of war. Beaten and driven in disgrace from their camp and earthworks on the Williamsburg road, the enemy made a bold attempt to regain the lost; round by a vigorous flank movement down the York River R. R., thinking thus to retrieve the fortunes of the day and place things as they were in the morning. Heavy firing consequently commenced between 5 and 6 P. M., to the left of the Williamsburg road, near the seven mile post, on the York River Railroad, but Oddaway's battery and a brigade in waiting received their advance with such ardor that, without any preliminary, the Tennesseeans and others throw themselves upon the Federals, drove in their skirmisher, attacked the main force, and up to the middle in water assailed the battery before them, and took it with the bayonet. The fighting in this direction was not of long duration, but of great intensity and noise, Imboden's (or Oddaway's) field pieces being worked with remarkable precision and celeri
Richmond Grays (search for this): article 1
it undisturbed! Expecting a resumption of hostilities on Sunday, every preparation was made therefore, and at an early hour, the enemy commenced to advance down the York River Railroad; but Gen. Mahone's Brigade (of Huger's command) met them, and gallantly drove them backwards again, although manfully attempting to regain the position lost the evening before. We are sorry to add that in this engagement, the 3d Alabama lost Col. Lomax, and Adj. Johnson, while the 12th Virginia (and Richmond Grays particularly) lost many valuable men. The 9th Virginia did not act so well as usual! The enemy were particularly active with artillery and accurately shelled the ambulance train on the York River road. Operations along the line yesterday, were not of very important nature, the enemy being intent upon preparing for their main attack to-day, (Monday.) We are sorry to say that our officers suffered severely in the two days operations, and among others we would add that Gen. Garland h
ght, our troops prepared to bivouac on the field, in readiness for the events of to-day. Of course it is impossible at this time to chronicle but a small portion of the casualties and incidents. We give such as we have been able to obtain. The 12th Virginia and the 3d Alabama behaved nobly. Both regiment were cut up badly. The Richmond Grays lost two killed and five wounded and missing. Probably no regiment suffered more than the 3d Alabama. Besides Col. Lomax, Adjutant Johnston, Capt Mays, Capt. Phelan, and Lieut. James Brown, were killed, and Captain Ready, Capt Robinson, Lieut Witherspoon, Lieut. Gardner, Lieut Partridge were wounded. These casualties were among the officers alone. The slaughter among the privates was terrific. The Lynchburg Artillery, formerly known as Latham's battery, now commanded by Captain James Dearing, did good service in the fight. The men fought bravely and laid many a Yankee upon the ground. Captain Dearing entered with thirty-four can
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