hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 60 0 Browse Search
George B. McClellan 30 0 Browse Search
Abraham Lincoln 24 0 Browse Search
Stonewall Jackson 24 0 Browse Search
William H. Seward 24 0 Browse Search
Strasburg, Va. (Virginia, United States) 24 0 Browse Search
France (France) 20 0 Browse Search
Front Royal (Virginia, United States) 20 0 Browse Search
Havana, N. Y. (New York, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
George R. Gordon 13 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: June 16, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 4 total hits in 2 results.

William H. Seward (search for this): article 12
e of his departure seems not to be known, while at the same time the fact of his going has given rise to a thousand conjectures. The Herald says he goes to persuade his Government not to recognise the independence of the Confederacy, inasmuch as Seward and Lincoln will crush out the rebellion in a few days. This shows, at any rate, what Lincoln and Seward wish the Yankee people to think. We doubt, however, whether he has gone on any such mission, although it is pretty certain that he is no frSeward wish the Yankee people to think. We doubt, however, whether he has gone on any such mission, although it is pretty certain that he is no friend to us. If he has, however, we think he will meet with an adversary in the Lancashire famine abundantly able to neutralise all the arguments he may use. Another rumor is, that he demanded his passports before he left Washington. This we doubt, for the simple reason that there is no cause of quarrel between the Yankee and English Governments, so far as we know. It is probable he goes for reasons of a nature altogether private.
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): article 12
arture seems not to be known, while at the same time the fact of his going has given rise to a thousand conjectures. The Herald says he goes to persuade his Government not to recognise the independence of the Confederacy, inasmuch as Seward and Lincoln will crush out the rebellion in a few days. This shows, at any rate, what Lincoln and Seward wish the Yankee people to think. We doubt, however, whether he has gone on any such mission, although it is pretty certain that he is no friend to us.Lincoln and Seward wish the Yankee people to think. We doubt, however, whether he has gone on any such mission, although it is pretty certain that he is no friend to us. If he has, however, we think he will meet with an adversary in the Lancashire famine abundantly able to neutralise all the arguments he may use. Another rumor is, that he demanded his passports before he left Washington. This we doubt, for the simple reason that there is no cause of quarrel between the Yankee and English Governments, so far as we know. It is probable he goes for reasons of a nature altogether private.