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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: June 26, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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United States (United States) (search for this): article 15
tle further; but that was all. Abolitionism is going to sweep everything before it, just as we foresaw it would. It was just as well to meet the matter now as at any time, but we did not expect you Northern Democrats to help swell the Abolition power." At length an affirmative answer to the proposition for an exchange was received from General Halleck, and the prisoners, a sorry looking set, were released. Colonel Thompson expressed his dissatisfaction at the course pursued by the United States with reference to a general exchange. It had added needless barbarism to the war, and its practice was in direct violation of the usages of civilized nations. Certainly the South had done enough fighting to entitle herself to treatment as at least a fighting power. There was (says the correspondent) too much good sense in this to give any ground for dispute, and so the interview ended, as it had begun, in the most perfect harmony. Ale was then produced, and all drank out of the same
Fort Heiman (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 15
Buchanan's well known Secretary of the Interior, the Hon. Jacob M. Thompson, Mississippi millionaire, ex- Congressman from the very district on whose soil he now stood under a flag of truce, and a man still entitled to Northern respect, as the only one of the resigning secessionists who left Mr. Buchanan's cabinet without the stain of dishonor upon his name. The Colonel had been sent in by Gen. Beauregard to turn over to Gen. Halleck some sixty-two prisoners recently captured near Fort Heiman, Tenn., (and released under parole not to bear arms against the Confederacy until regularly exchanged,) and to see what Gen. Halleck would agree to in the way of a general system of exchanges. He was escorted by Beauregard's body- guard, a fine body of cavalry from New Orleans, under the command of Captain Dreux. It might be ungenerous, after the very pleasant interview we had, but our officers could not repress their suspicion that there was another object besides the release of sixty-two
secessionists who left Mr. Buchanan's cabinet without the stain of dishonor upon his name. The Colonel had been sent in by Gen. Beauregard to turn over to Gen. Halleck some sixty-two prisoners recently captured near Fort Heiman, Tenn., (and released under parole not to bear arms against the Confederacy until regularly exchanged,) and to see what Gen. Halleck would agree to in the way of a general system of exchanges. He was escorted by Beauregard's body- guard, a fine body of cavalry from New Orleans, under the command of Captain Dreux. It might be ungenerous, after the very pleasant interview we had, but our officers could not repress their suspiciot expect you Northern Democrats to help swell the Abolition power." At length an affirmative answer to the proposition for an exchange was received from General Halleck, and the prisoners, a sorry looking set, were released. Colonel Thompson expressed his dissatisfaction at the course pursued by the United States with refere
Jacob M. Thompson (search for this): article 15
ning of the present year. It was Mr. Buchanan's well known Secretary of the Interior, the Hon. Jacob M. Thompson, Mississippi millionaire, ex- Congressman from the very district on whose soil he now th sides. The following is a specimen: "We don't like to fight you Northern men," said Col. Thompson; "it grieves us to think of having to meet men we like as we do you in battle; we want to fil. Council disputed the proposition. "You'll see how it will be when the war is over," said Col. Thompson. "Even now you can see how Congress is drifting, and the current is sure to set, and s was received from General Halleck, and the prisoners, a sorry looking set, were released. Colonel Thompson expressed his dissatisfaction at the course pursued by the United States with reference to aken with marked cordiality all around. "May we meet again under pleasanter auspices," said Col. Thompson--and there was not one of the party that did not fervently echo the wish, and inwardly hope
Beauregard (search for this): article 15
bing the approach of the flag, the writer proceeds as follows: Riding up, I was introduced to Col. Thompson, of Gen. Beauregard's staff. The cordial warmth of manner, the fine head, expressive features, and grizzly beard and moustache were notts who left Mr. Buchanan's cabinet without the stain of dishonor upon his name. The Colonel had been sent in by Gen. Beauregard to turn over to Gen. Halleck some sixty-two prisoners recently captured near Fort Heiman, Tenn., (and released underxchanged,) and to see what Gen. Halleck would agree to in the way of a general system of exchanges. He was escorted by Beauregard's body- guard, a fine body of cavalry from New Orleans, under the command of Captain Dreux. It might be ungenerous, afrvently echo the wish, and inwardly hope that he might some day have an opportunity to do a kindness to this officer of Beauregard's staff. But at last there was no excuse for waiting longer, Mounting their horses, the Colonel and Captain waved a fi
inet without the stain of dishonor upon his name. The Colonel had been sent in by Gen. Beauregard to turn over to Gen. Halleck some sixty-two prisoners recently captured near Fort Heiman, Tenn., (and released under parole not to bear arms against the Confederacy until regularly exchanged,) and to see what Gen. Halleck would agree to in the way of a general system of exchanges. He was escorted by Beauregard's body- guard, a fine body of cavalry from New Orleans, under the command of Captain Dreux. It might be ungenerous, after the very pleasant interview we had, but our officers could not repress their suspicion that there was another object besides the release of sixty-two paroled prisoners, and that they were desirous of learning precisely where our lines were, and what more they could by penetrating them as far as possible. The writer then gives a report of the conversation, which turned upon politics, the war, and kindred subjects, and was conducted with perfect courtes
Franklin Buchanan (search for this): article 15
uced to Col. Thompson, of Gen. Beauregard's staff. The cordial warmth of manner, the fine head, expressive features, and grizzly beard and moustache were not unfamiliar in Washington, even so late as the beginning of the present year. It was Mr. Buchanan's well known Secretary of the Interior, the Hon. Jacob M. Thompson, Mississippi millionaire, ex- Congressman from the very district on whose soil he now stood under a flag of truce, and a man still entitled to Northern respect, as the only one of the resigning secessionists who left Mr. Buchanan's cabinet without the stain of dishonor upon his name. The Colonel had been sent in by Gen. Beauregard to turn over to Gen. Halleck some sixty-two prisoners recently captured near Fort Heiman, Tenn., (and released under parole not to bear arms against the Confederacy until regularly exchanged,) and to see what Gen. Halleck would agree to in the way of a general system of exchanges. He was escorted by Beauregard's body- guard, a fine bod
Jacob Thompson (search for this): article 15
An Incident of the War. A correspondent of a New York paper gives a graphic account of the interview which took place between the two armies recently confronting each other at Corinth, under a flag of truce, borne by a detachment under Col. Jacob Thompson, of Mississippi. After describing the approach of the flag, the writer proceeds as follows: Riding up, I was introduced to Col. Thompson, of Gen. Beauregard's staff. The cordial warmth of manner, the fine head, expressive features, Col. Thompson, of Gen. Beauregard's staff. The cordial warmth of manner, the fine head, expressive features, and grizzly beard and moustache were not unfamiliar in Washington, even so late as the beginning of the present year. It was Mr. Buchanan's well known Secretary of the Interior, the Hon. Jacob M. Thompson, Mississippi millionaire, ex- Congressman from the very district on whose soil he now stood under a flag of truce, and a man still entitled to Northern respect, as the only one of the resigning secessionists who left Mr. Buchanan's cabinet without the stain of dishonor upon his name. The