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Hesse (Hesse, Germany) (search for this): article 2
ife terminated by the establishment of the Southern Confederacy. Miscellaneous foreign items The Prince of Wales reached Windsor June 14, from the East. The Japanese Ambassadors were to embark at Woolwich for Holland on the day that the Etna left Liverpool. The number of visitors at the Great Exhibition on Monday, the 9th, was 58,682--the largest attendance yet. The English Court had been ordered into mourning for a week on account of the death of the Grand Duchess of Hesse. The Pacha of Egypt continued in London, and had been visited by the Lord Chamberlain on the part of Her Majesty. Paris letters say that a telegram dated Brussels, the night of the 14th of June, holds out little hope of the King of Belgium's recovery. The Turks, after having taken the entrenchments at Ostrog, had advanced on Abai. The entrenchments were taken by assault after five hours fighting. All the Montenegro residing in Turkey had been recalled by their Prince.
Austria (Austria) (search for this): article 2
ority by land and by sea; we will accept proximate triumphs for the North. The question which the positive spirit of modern civilization is so fond of putting still remains: "And what then?" Will the triumph of the Federal arms produce miracles?--Will it change the seasons? Will it dissipate the hot weather and the sickness which must ensue?--Can it manage that the extent of territory conquered, and consequently to be occupied, shall not be equal to the whole extent of France, England and Austria put together? Where are the armies to occupy such an extent, and where is the moral strength which could dispense with occupying them and hold the place of soldiers? We simply wish to touch upon facts — nothing but facts. What do we see on the side of the Confederates? They burn their produce; they burn their provisions; they destroy their railways; they blow up their dockyards, their arsenals, and their ships; they leave their wives and children to fight in battle. When in a procl
Ostroh (Ukraine) (search for this): article 2
on Monday, the 9th, was 58,682--the largest attendance yet. The English Court had been ordered into mourning for a week on account of the death of the Grand Duchess of Hesse. The Pacha of Egypt continued in London, and had been visited by the Lord Chamberlain on the part of Her Majesty. Paris letters say that a telegram dated Brussels, the night of the 14th of June, holds out little hope of the King of Belgium's recovery. The Turks, after having taken the entrenchments at Ostrog, had advanced on Abai. The entrenchments were taken by assault after five hours fighting. All the Montenegro residing in Turkey had been recalled by their Prince. The Paris evening journals, of June 11, publish the following: Dervish Pacha has encamped at Nicksich; being short of provisions. The Prince of Montenegro and Mirko had retreated in the direction of Maratz. Commercial intelligence. The London Money Market.--In the London money market the funds were dull, but wi
France (France) (search for this): article 2
ied, shall not be equal to the whole extent of France, England and Austria put together? Where are pe. One year ago, when the was broke out, France offered her mediation to America. That offer w homes, might have been spared if the voice of France had then been listened to. The Paris Patrnegotiations for a joint offer of mediation by France and England. [from the London Shipping Garic's note, nothing more is affirmed than that France has determined to ask England to join in mediaed. Other Paris correspondence speak as if France was already assured of the co- operation of Enous propositions should be made by England and France at Richmond and Washington, and that in case ole; but it would rejoice to see the Emperor of France or the Char of Russia press on the Americans tcation of the good sense of the Governments of France and England, and of their respect for internatthe French reports of negotiations. It thinks France can go further in the matter than England, and
Fishmonger's hall (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 2
, directly or indirectly, in the question of slavery where it exists; I do not think that I have the right to do so legally, and I am by no means inclined to do so." It is thus that the North speaks in the spirit of moderation and of justice. Will the South be less accessible to this spirit of conciliation and of wisdom? We do not think so, and we have a proof at hand. A man of consideration in the South, (Mr. Yancey,) a Commissioner of the Southern States, at a banquet given at Fishmonger's Hall on the 9th of November last, in London, spoke as follows: When our adversary shall have become sufficiently calm to treat us as belligerents, the aurora of peace will appear in the horizon. When that hour has struck, I think I may say that the Confederate Government will not show itself inflexible, except upon one point — the care of our honor and of our independence. As regards the great interest of peace and humanity, our, Government will know how to make concessions in every
Russia (Russia) (search for this): article 2
anifestations of the European press in favor of pacification. The London Times, in an editorial on the ministers, says: There will be no disposition to quarrel with the decision of the Cabinet, and the country will gladly leave the question in the hands of the Government to choose such an opportunity and mode of action as they may deem proper. The London Times, admits that advice from England would not be acceptable; but it would rejoice to see the Emperor of France or the Char of Russia press on the Americans the counsels which would be indignantly rejected if offered by England. The London Times then speculates on the disastrous effects of either a Northern conquest or the reverse, and argues that, if the Southerners continue to protract the struggle, the time must come when the intervention of Europe will be demanded by the interests of humanity, and perhaps accepted willingly by the exhausted combatants England may then with prudence hold itself in readiness to supp
Orleans (France) (search for this): article 2
1¾ for money. The bullion in the Bank of England had decreased £450,000. Baring says the disposition to sell American stocks continues, and tends to depress prices. The Paris Bourse. Paris, June 14, 1862. The Bourse is firmer. The Rentes closed yesterday (June 13) at 68f. 65 The Liverpool cotton market. Liverpool. June 14, 1862. The Brokers' Circular reports the sales of the week at 84,000 bales. The market has been buoyant and prices are one-quarter to three-eighths of a penny higher. The sales to speculators have been 22,000 bales, and to exporters 23,000. The sales on Friday were 7,000 bales, including 3,500 to speculators and exporters, the market closing firm at the annexed quotations: Fair.Middling. Orleans14½13¼ Mobiles13¾13 Uplands13½12 ⅞ The stock in port is estimated at 289,000 bales, of which 92,000 are American. State of trade. There have been no sales in the Manchester market, owing to the Whitsun holi
Windsor (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 2
matter than England, and would rejoice to see the struggle ended without the interference of England. Mr. Beresford Hope writes to the London Times in favor of mediation. He claims to have felt the popular pulse in England during the course of lectures which he has been giving on America, and asserts that a great majority of the people would fain see the strife terminated by the establishment of the Southern Confederacy. Miscellaneous foreign items The Prince of Wales reached Windsor June 14, from the East. The Japanese Ambassadors were to embark at Woolwich for Holland on the day that the Etna left Liverpool. The number of visitors at the Great Exhibition on Monday, the 9th, was 58,682--the largest attendance yet. The English Court had been ordered into mourning for a week on account of the death of the Grand Duchess of Hesse. The Pacha of Egypt continued in London, and had been visited by the Lord Chamberlain on the part of Her Majesty. Paris
Manchester (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 2
91¾ for money. The bullion in the Bank of England had decreased £450,000. Baring says the disposition to sell American stocks continues, and tends to depress prices. The Paris Bourse. Paris, June 14, 1862. The Bourse is firmer. The Rentes closed yesterday (June 13) at 68f. 65 The Liverpool cotton market. Liverpool. June 14, 1862. The Brokers' Circular reports the sales of the week at 84,000 bales. The market has been buoyant and prices are one-quarter to three-eighths of a penny higher. The sales to speculators have been 22,000 bales, and to exporters 23,000. The sales on Friday were 7,000 bales, including 3,500 to speculators and exporters, the market closing firm at the annexed quotations: Fair.Middling. Orleans14½13¼ Mobiles13¾13 Uplands13½12 ⅞ The stock in port is estimated at 289,000 bales, of which 92,000 are American. State of trade. There have been no sales in the Manchester market, owing to the Whitsun holi
Woolwich (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 2
erference of England. Mr. Beresford Hope writes to the London Times in favor of mediation. He claims to have felt the popular pulse in England during the course of lectures which he has been giving on America, and asserts that a great majority of the people would fain see the strife terminated by the establishment of the Southern Confederacy. Miscellaneous foreign items The Prince of Wales reached Windsor June 14, from the East. The Japanese Ambassadors were to embark at Woolwich for Holland on the day that the Etna left Liverpool. The number of visitors at the Great Exhibition on Monday, the 9th, was 58,682--the largest attendance yet. The English Court had been ordered into mourning for a week on account of the death of the Grand Duchess of Hesse. The Pacha of Egypt continued in London, and had been visited by the Lord Chamberlain on the part of Her Majesty. Paris letters say that a telegram dated Brussels, the night of the 14th of June, holds
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