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Tuscany (Italy) (search for this): article 3
the new Government has been indubitably shown. Immense armies have been raised, the greatest sacrifices have been endured, the persistence of the South in the war through a long series of battles — some victories, some defeats — has shown the 'force and consistency' which are looked upon as the tests of nationality." The writer proceeds to observe that if the South claim its recognition as an Independent Power, the precedents of the British and Spanish American colonies, of Belgium, and of Tuscany and Naples, forbid England "to question this right when asserted by the Confederate States;" and that "it is the duty of the British Government to anticipate this possible event." For some time past British statesmen and their press have put a restraint upon their wonted hostility to the United States. They are beginning, perhaps, to forget the affair of the capture of their West India mail steamer, which so nearly involved them in a war with this country. They then blessed their sta
Poland (Poland) (search for this): article 3
proclamation they were now considering.--The course which had been pursued in regard to it was neither improper nor unusual. The honorable baronet had quoted certain precedents; but he need not go further than the discussions which had taken place in that and the other House of Parliament to show that when a great act of inhumanity had been committed by a foreign nation they were perfectly justified in commenting on the proceeding. There had been a debate on the conduct of Russia-to-wards Poland, and there had also been a discussion on the conduct of an Italian General in the south of Italy. Government had not failed to express their opinion in regard to both of these transactions. He deprecated any fussy or meddling interference with foreign States. He entirely disapproved those homilies and lectures that were too often read by our ministers to foreign States, and which were infinitely more agreeable to the compilers than to the receivers. He also deprecated the conduct of
France (France) (search for this): article 3
ional light upon the movements now going on in France and England. It appears that the programme is, that France will take the lead in the "mediation" or intervention scheme for the settlement of the with him from the start, but she prefers that France shall bear the first shock resulting from the ation may have to be considered by England and France, The Southern Confederacy has constituted itsesmemberment and destruction of the Republic of France. At that time France had no naval force with France had no naval force with which she could cope with her rival. Yet she held her own. But the navy of the Republic of the Unitia, which so long ruled the waves; and whereas France was surrounded in close contiguity by England ce of success against a Republic mightier than France, and that has remained unconquered ever since sition to annihilate the navies of England and France, and of all the maritime Powers of Europe. Caas convinced the ruler of brave and chivalrous France would do, if he had not already done it--(hear
Canute (Oklahoma, United States) (search for this): article 3
s much as to say: "You had better of your own accord rebuke General Butler, or we will take you in hand, as we did in the case of the Trent." Is England to become censor general of the manners of all nations in peace and war, and to punish them if they do not square with her ideas of propriety? Such impudence and presumption can find no precedent save in the folly of the British monarch who stood on the sea-shore and ordered the waves to recede; but they flowed on in their majesty, and poor Canute was soon compelled to escape from their power. But let England rest assured, that by any European coalition she can form she will be as- unsuccessful in her designs against the independence, the union and integrity of the American Republic, as were all her coalition for the dismemberment and destruction of the Republic of France. At that time France had no naval force with which she could cope with her rival. Yet she held her own. But the navy of the Republic of the United States is m
Stadacona (Canada) (search for this): article 3
sapproved those homilies and lectures that were too often read by our ministers to foreign States, and which were infinitely more agreeable to the compilers than to the receivers. He also deprecated the conduct of those who ransacked the newspapers for the purpose of putting questions in that House which were of no possible use, and were received by foreign countries with great dissatisfaction. He entirely agreed with what was said in the vacation speech of the right honorable member for Huntingdon, (General Peel.) that such intermeddling tended to produce a general feeling of dissatisfaction towards this country on the continent, and led foreigners to say, in their hearts at least, with Orlando, "I do desire that we should be better strangers." But when a proclamation repugnant to decency, civilization, and humanity; had been-promulgated and put in force against a people endeared to us by every tie of family, language and religion, then he did think we had a right to protest ag
West Indies (search for this): article 3
ment to anticipate this possible event." For some time past British statesmen and their press have put a restraint upon their wonted hostility to the United States. They are beginning, perhaps, to forget the affair of the capture of their West India mail steamer, which so nearly involved them in a war with this country. They then blessed their stars that they escaped, as it were, out of the fire. At that time, too, they hoped that the insurrectionary States would succeed in their design.employed. With this reenforced, as it will be next fall, by a tremendous addition of iron-clad gunboats, we will be in a position to annihilate the navies of England and France, and of all the maritime Powers of Europe. Canada and the British West India Islands would fall, like ripe pears, into the lap of the American Republic, and Great Britain would cease to own a foot of soil in the New World, while perhaps Ireland, taking advantage of her tyrant's difficulty would at last work out a succes
United States (United States) (search for this): article 3
, forbid England "to question this right when asserted by the Confederate States;" and that "it is the duty of the British Government to anticr press have put a restraint upon their wonted hostility to the United States. They are beginning, perhaps, to forget the affair of the captval. Yet she held her own. But the navy of the Republic of the United States is more than a match for that of Britannia, which so long ruledly filled. They have come second best out of two wars with the United States; out of a third, perhaps, they would never come at all. The Sour repudiation of the act on their part of the Government of the United States. (Hear, hear.) Under these circumstances, the hope he had enteproclamation stating, that "as the officers and soldiers of the United States had been subjected to repeated insults from women calling thems I cannot bring myself to behave but that the Government of the United States, whenever they had notice of this order, must of their own acco
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 3
United States; out of a third, perhaps, they would never come at all. The Southern fleet is completely used up. We have a powerful naval force left almost unemployed. With this reenforced, as it will be next fall, by a tremendous addition of iron-clad gunboats, we will be in a position to annihilate the navies of England and France, and of all the maritime Powers of Europe. Canada and the British West India Islands would fall, like ripe pears, into the lap of the American Republic, and Great Britain would cease to own a foot of soil in the New World, while perhaps Ireland, taking advantage of her tyrant's difficulty would at last work out a successful revolution, and leave, "the sister" island alone in its glory. General Butler's proclamation before the British people. In the House of Commons on the same night Sir J. Waish rose to ask the Under Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs whether Her Majesty's Government had received official information authenticating a proclama
Belgium (Belgium) (search for this): article 3
f the people to the new Government has been indubitably shown. Immense armies have been raised, the greatest sacrifices have been endured, the persistence of the South in the war through a long series of battles — some victories, some defeats — has shown the 'force and consistency' which are looked upon as the tests of nationality." The writer proceeds to observe that if the South claim its recognition as an Independent Power, the precedents of the British and Spanish American colonies, of Belgium, and of Tuscany and Naples, forbid England "to question this right when asserted by the Confederate States;" and that "it is the duty of the British Government to anticipate this possible event." For some time past British statesmen and their press have put a restraint upon their wonted hostility to the United States. They are beginning, perhaps, to forget the affair of the capture of their West India mail steamer, which so nearly involved them in a war with this country. They then b
Charleston Harbor (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 3
ed by barbarous cruelty on both sides. The British Government endeavored by negotiation to stop those brutal practices, and, though the war went on, they succeeded in their object by means of the Elliott Convention. The noble viscount now at the head of the Government had perpetually interfered by way of remonstrance, and had tendered excellent advice to almost every Government in Europe. Not long age, too, Earl Russell remonstrated with this very American Government for blocking up Charleston harbor with a stone fleet. But surely our interposition was now far more imperatively called for by an act which tended to degrade human nature itself — to throw back civilization, and revive the spirit of a Ghengis Khan or a Nadir Shah. (Hear, hear.) It would be most unjust, without more reliable information on the point, to accuse the American Government of any participation in this enormity. It that Government at once signified its disapproval of this proclamation public, opinion wo
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