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given for such interference will be "the cause of humanity," From the James River.[Correspondence of the New York Tribune] James River Squadron, June 23.--I send you the official report of the affairs at Watkins's Bluff, on the 20th inst., and as it speaks for itself, we shall offer no comments. We have had some changes here within the last few days. Our squadron is lying this P. M. off City, Point, Contrabands bring the intelligence that the Confederates claim to have lost one man killed and one man's arm shot off in the fight on the 20th, at Watkins's Bluff. It that is all, they came off very lucky We, as I stated before, had no one injured in the least, although they claim to have killed 20 men, as we are also informed by contrabands: United States Steamer Jacon Bell.James River, June 21, 1862. Sir: I respectfully submit the following: Yesterday, in obedience to your orders I proceeded with the dispatches up the river to the Manitor.--On passing the
e at Charleston with as much avidity as he did upon that in Banks department. On this subject Hon. J. A. Gurley has received a letter from a highly intelligent adopted citizen of Ohio, who has been in England for the past six months, spending much time in the cotton district. He says: Firstly — I have the best reasons for knowing that intervention in our affairs was determined upon by England and France some months ago, and for the reasons, amongst others, I gave you in my letter of March last. Secondly — This determination would have been acted upon before this had not the contest between the Monitor and Merrimac taken Europe — the world, in fact — by surprise, and upset all the calculations of France and England especially. They became alarmed for their own safety. Thirdly — The dread of a Monitor fleet, which I understand we are now building, adds another to the reasons which determined these Powers to interfere, and they will never permit this fleet to be comp
June 23rd (search for this): article 8
land at this time is in accordance with and necessary to this latter programme, to confer with the Governments of both countries so as to arrange the details of the expedition. Sevenths--The interference of them Powers is altogether owing to selfish motives, not that either care for our condition, although the ostensible reason to be given for such interference will be "the cause of humanity," From the James River.[Correspondence of the New York Tribune] James River Squadron, June 23.--I send you the official report of the affairs at Watkins's Bluff, on the 20th inst., and as it speaks for itself, we shall offer no comments. We have had some changes here within the last few days. Our squadron is lying this P. M. off City, Point, Contrabands bring the intelligence that the Confederates claim to have lost one man killed and one man's arm shot off in the fight on the 20th, at Watkins's Bluff. It that is all, they came off very lucky We, as I stated before, had no o
June 27th (search for this): article 8
nry for publishing "certain unauthorized news" regarding the movements of Gen. McClellan. We take the following extracts from the Northern papers: The situation before Richmond.[Correspondence of the New York Tribune.] Fortress Monroe, June 27.--They who have known the reasons for delay on the Chickahominy, and have experienced no disappointment that the impending battle has not been fought, begin to turn in expectancy towards the quarter that has so long engaged the attention of the witical suicide, and will never be able to recover from this last most miserable fear pas, The action of the President is university approved, and the conduct of General Banks highly commended. Important rumor from Richmond. City Point,Va, June 27. --Refugees, who have been taken by our gunboats to-day, report that the rebel Generals Jackson, Price, and Beauregard are in Richmond, and will be assigned to important commands shortly. A rumor prevailed in the rebel camp yesterday t
June 28th (search for this): article 8
culation is useless until we have something definite upon which to base it, be it good or bad. Resignation of Gen. Fremont.[from the Hartford (Conn.) times, June 28.] All true friends of the country will rejoice at the recent act of the President in placing Gen. Pope, a true soldier of proved military skill and efficiencyuthern region a live hell for one generation at least. " News from Fredericksburg — Departure of Gen. King for the Shenandoah Valley. Fredericksburg, Va., June 28. --Gen. King and staff left Fredericksburg to day for the Valley of the Shenandoah, where he assumes command of General Fremont's corps. The news of his reaily expected to arrive, though it is not yet known at what point his headquarters will be established. Imprisonment of clergymen in Nashville. Nashville, June 28. --At the special second conference of clergymen before Governor Johnson all declined to take the oath of allegiance, Most of them were sent to the Penitent
June 29th (search for this): article 8
The following dispatch reached this city last night, and was published in the extra editions of the city papers: Baltimore American office. Baltimore, Sunday, June 29.--9 P. M. I am writing for the American a detailed account of events at White House, before Richmond, and on the Peninsula, during the past four days, incPress. After waiting patiently for the news, as promised above, until midnight, we were surprised at the reception of the following dispatch: Baltimore, Sunday, June 29--11 P. M. The Secretary of War Decides that nothing can be telegraphed relative to affairs on the Peninsula. Have tried our best to get it off. C. ciated Press. As a commentary on this, we append the following, which was received from the War Department yesterday afternoon: War Department, Washington, June 29, 2 o'clock P. M. As soon as the Department can obtain exact in formation of the state of affairs in front of Richmond, it will be imparted to the public, whet
June 30th (search for this): article 8
P. McCrea, Lieutenant Commanding. Commander J. M. Gillis, commanding naval forces, James river. The great battle before Richmond,[from the N. Y. World, June 30.] A battle, which resulted, as we are informed by a trustworthy authority, in the grandest Union triumph of the war, and which would probably insure the captumond. In a few hours, however, we hope that the public may be relieved from its painful suspense. The Withheld news from Richmond.[from the New York times, June 30.] The public appetite, which was whetted last night, at a late hour, by the publication of the telegraphic news, via Baltimore, that "we have the grandest milid not appear. The Rev. Mr. Hendricks is expected to take the oath. Catholic livings, being loyal, were not disturbed. Affairs at Alexandria. Alexandria, June 30. --Capt. McMillan, of company E, 4th Ohio, fell overboard yesterday, and before assistance could be extended to him he was drowned. The hospitals in this c
September (search for this): article 8
out forty years of age, and a native of Kentucky. He is a son of Governor Nathaniel Pope, of Virginia, who went to Kentucky before the birth of John, and, after living in Kentucky a few years removed to Illinois John, the son, entered the West Point Academy in 1838. He graduated in 1842, and was appointed to the army from the State of Illinois, entering the service as a Brevet 3d Lieutenant for gallant and meritorious conduct in several conflicts at Monterey, the brevet bearing date from September . On the 23d of February, 1847, he was brevetted Captain for gallant and meritorious conduct at the battle of Vista. On the 1st of July, 1862 he took the actual rank of Captain in the corps of Topographical Engineers, and on the 17th of May, 1861, was made a Brigadier-General of volunteers. His brilliant movement in Central Mississippi tended as much as anything to restores place to that State, and his brilliant of New led to the evaluation of that place. Since its first pos
October 1st (search for this): article 8
to be completed if they can possibly prevent it. Fourthly — They will soon offer mediation, taking decided Southern ground — well knowing that this will not be acceptable to our Government. It is not their intention or wish that it should be accepted. Fifthly — This being refused, they will send their combined fleets to surround our coast whilst there is but one Monitor in existence, knowing that this terrible little thing cannot be everywhere at the same time. Sixthly — The first of October next, it not an earlier date, will find the French and English fleets on our shores, unless our army is victorious in the meantime, and the rebels defeated. The visit of Lord Lyons to England at this time is in accordance with and necessary to this latter programme, to confer with the Governments of both countries so as to arrange the details of the expedition. Sevenths--The interference of them Powers is altogether owing to selfish motives, not that either care for our condition,
grazing country and wheat country to subsist a large army. This involves, as a necessity, a continued and undisturbed rebel occupation of the plains and valleys of Virginia. Their Generals. From some of the Northern papers we take sketches of three of the Federal Generals, commencing with the unhappy. Brigadier-General Silas Casey. Brigadier-General Silas Casey commanded the advance division at the battle of Fair Oaks. --General Casey was born in Rhode Island about the year 1806; entered West Point in 1822; graduated in 1826, and entered the Seventh infantry; was promoted to First Lieutenant in June, 1836, and Captain in July, 1839. In the Florida war Captain Casey served with distinction under General Worth. He served also throughout the Mexican war, and added still further to his reputation for gallantry. At Contreras and Churubusco be distinguished himself, and received the braver of Major. At the assault on Chapuitepec he led the storming party, and was sever
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