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Ellsworth (search for this): article 1
ant retribution as near in kind as possible by the Southern Government. The war began in a spirit and with declarations that would have warranted the South at the start in hanging out the black flag, and in neither giving nor asking quarter. The infernal beastliness openly proclaimed in the streets of New York and the bellish cruelties threatened by the Yankee Congress warranted such a resistance on the part of the South as that to which Jackson sounded the key note when he shot down Ellsworth in Alexandria. The Grand Army scathe to Manassas with handcuffs and halters, and, if they had succeeded in that battle, the citizens of Richmond and of all Virginia would soon have understood the purposes for which those instruments were intended. It is true that sobered by defeat, they have since that time disclaimed sundry brutalities, so shockingly beastly that the whole world cried out against them, but have they ever relinquished their bloody and inhumen purposes?, Do they not still
, if they are successful, will sweep from every Southern citizen every dollar be is worth on the face of the earth? Have they not armed the negroes against their masters? Do not the brutal order of Butler in New Orleans, the horrible murder of Mumford by that unspeakable villain and similar atrocities in other Southern cities, cry aloud for retribution. We do not complain that our fields are desolated, that our gardens have been converted into deserts; that the property of our people has. But those infamous and inhuman departures from the rules of civilized warfare to which we have referred deserve and demand not only the reprobation of the world, but that retaliation which is the only means of civilizing savages. The death of Mumford and every similar outrage must be summarily avenged. And the impudent Yankee dynasty at Washington must be given to understand that we hold them as rebels against the Constitution and traitors to Liberty, whose crimes deserve the halter more th
B. C. Butler (search for this): article 1
em, but have they ever relinquished their bloody and inhumen purposes?, Do they not still hold the halter over the heads of all the chiefs of this rebellion? Do they not arrest and thrust our peaceful citizens into jail for the crime of patriotism? Have they not passed a confiscation law, which, if they are successful, will sweep from every Southern citizen every dollar be is worth on the face of the earth? Have they not armed the negroes against their masters? Do not the brutal order of Butler in New Orleans, the horrible murder of Mumford by that unspeakable villain and similar atrocities in other Southern cities, cry aloud for retribution. We do not complain that our fields are desolated, that our gardens have been converted into deserts; that the property of our people has been subjected to wanton destruction; that their feelings have been outraged; that the inhabitants of our cities occupied by the enemy have been the victims of unparalleled oppressions and indignities.
W. C. Jackson (search for this): article 1
he laws of war by the North, there shall be instant retribution as near in kind as possible by the Southern Government. The war began in a spirit and with declarations that would have warranted the South at the start in hanging out the black flag, and in neither giving nor asking quarter. The infernal beastliness openly proclaimed in the streets of New York and the bellish cruelties threatened by the Yankee Congress warranted such a resistance on the part of the South as that to which Jackson sounded the key note when he shot down Ellsworth in Alexandria. The Grand Army scathe to Manassas with handcuffs and halters, and, if they had succeeded in that battle, the citizens of Richmond and of all Virginia would soon have understood the purposes for which those instruments were intended. It is true that sobered by defeat, they have since that time disclaimed sundry brutalities, so shockingly beastly that the whole world cried out against them, but have they ever relinquished their
W. C. Jackson (search for this): article 1
ad is forty-five miles, we may well imagine that the bombardment is the most tremendous ever known on this continent. The citizens of Vicksburg and military authorities are firm in their determination to suffer the city to be battered down before they will surrender." Jackson's cavalry, besides destroying a train of ears near Memphis, captured 100 wagon loads of stores, 600 horses and mules, and $150,000 in specie, all of which was saved and brought South. [Second Dispatch.] Jackson, July 2.--The Federal fleet is still bombarding Vicksburg, but with little effect. [Third Dispatch.] Mobile, July 4.--A special dispatch to the Tribune, dated Vicksburg, yesterday, says the upper fleet slowly bombarded the city yesterday and to-day without effect. The lower fleet is silent. The enemy have established communication opposite the city between the upper and lower fleets. It is believed they are building railroad connections to transport provisions. The Brookly
April, 7 AD (search for this): article 1
zens of Vicksburg and military authorities are firm in their determination to suffer the city to be battered down before they will surrender." Jackson's cavalry, besides destroying a train of ears near Memphis, captured 100 wagon loads of stores, 600 horses and mules, and $150,000 in specie, all of which was saved and brought South. [Second Dispatch.] Jackson, July 2.--The Federal fleet is still bombarding Vicksburg, but with little effect. [Third Dispatch.] Mobile, July 4.--A special dispatch to the Tribune, dated Vicksburg, yesterday, says the upper fleet slowly bombarded the city yesterday and to-day without effect. The lower fleet is silent. The enemy have established communication opposite the city between the upper and lower fleets. It is believed they are building railroad connections to transport provisions. The Brooklyn is reported sunk. Deserters say that the enemy has suffered considerably from our batteries, and that one shell killed nine
February, 7 AD (search for this): article 1
The war is the Southwest--bombardment of Vicksburg, &c. Mobile July 2. --A special dispatch to the Tribune from the Jackson Mississippian, to-day, says: "As we write the booming of deep-toned cannon from the enemy's fleet at Vicksburg is distinctly heard. When it is remembered that the distance by railroad is forty-five miles, we may well imagine that the bombardment is the most tremendous ever known on this continent. The citizens of Vicksburg and military authorities are firm inurrender." Jackson's cavalry, besides destroying a train of ears near Memphis, captured 100 wagon loads of stores, 600 horses and mules, and $150,000 in specie, all of which was saved and brought South. [Second Dispatch.] Jackson, July 2.--The Federal fleet is still bombarding Vicksburg, but with little effect. [Third Dispatch.] Mobile, July 4.--A special dispatch to the Tribune, dated Vicksburg, yesterday, says the upper fleet slowly bombarded the city yesterday and to
Jackson (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 1
atch to the Tribune from the Jackson Mississippian, to-day, says: "As we write the booming of deep-toned cannon from the enemy's fleet at Vicksburg is distinctly heard. When it is remembered that the distance by railroad is forty-five miles, we may well imagine that the bombardment is the most tremendous ever known on this continent. The citizens of Vicksburg and military authorities are firm in their determination to suffer the city to be battered down before they will surrender." Jackson's cavalry, besides destroying a train of ears near Memphis, captured 100 wagon loads of stores, 600 horses and mules, and $150,000 in specie, all of which was saved and brought South. [Second Dispatch.] Jackson, July 2.--The Federal fleet is still bombarding Vicksburg, but with little effect. [Third Dispatch.] Mobile, July 4.--A special dispatch to the Tribune, dated Vicksburg, yesterday, says the upper fleet slowly bombarded the city yesterday and to-day without effect.
tunes of the day were decided. Gen. Featherstone, we learn, is now at the Arlington House, improving slowly. As his deeds of gallantry have made him conspicuous in our late fights, we will give the following sketch of his life, which we know to be correct: Winfield Scott Featherstone is a native of Virginia. He is about 12 or 13 years of age. When he left Virginia, he settled in Chickasaw county, Miss., for the practice of the law. He was elected to Congress in 1817, and served until 1851, when being an ardent Secessionist at that time, he was defeated, along with our present illustrious Chief Magistrate, who was in the same year candidate for Governor of Mississippi. Since that time he has been practicing law in Holly Springs, justly regarded as one of the brightest intellects, and as recent events have shown, one of the bravest and most daring of the gallant sons of the Magnolia State. His Adjutant General, Capt. Geo. P. Foote, a most estimable gentlemen, was killed in the
s wounded until the fortunes of the day were decided. Gen. Featherstone, we learn, is now at the Arlington House, improving slowly. As his deeds of gallantry have made him conspicuous in our late fights, we will give the following sketch of his life, which we know to be correct: Winfield Scott Featherstone is a native of Virginia. He is about 12 or 13 years of age. When he left Virginia, he settled in Chickasaw county, Miss., for the practice of the law. He was elected to Congress in 1817, and served until 1851, when being an ardent Secessionist at that time, he was defeated, along with our present illustrious Chief Magistrate, who was in the same year candidate for Governor of Mississippi. Since that time he has been practicing law in Holly Springs, justly regarded as one of the brightest intellects, and as recent events have shown, one of the bravest and most daring of the gallant sons of the Magnolia State. His Adjutant General, Capt. Geo. P. Foote, a most estimable gentl
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