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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: July 19, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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South River, Ga. (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 2
e 24th. Mr. Bramlet is now in this city. He says he found the people of Canada, much to his astonishment, almost a unit in favor of the South. He had been led to believe that the Canadians were all abolitionists, whereas, on the contrary, he found but two during his stay, and those were Yankee traders, who had settled there on speculation. The Canadians say the free negroes are a great evil in the community. These negroes, they say, who are run into Canada by the Abolition fanatics, are the only paupers and pauper population they have. In some places they are taxed pretty heavily for the support of this part of their population. They are a lazy, thriftless set, some of them starving themselves in their wretchedness rather than work. The Government has frequently to make contributions to them. The Canadians would rejoice to see them all packed off South, where they might be made useful. The Canadians, Mr. Bramlet says, are really Northern men with Southern proclivities.
Nassau River (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 2
spitably and kindly received by the citizens of that place, and a contribution made up for him. He was also given free trans port, or right of way, on the Grand Trunk Railway to Quebec, with a letter of introduction to the Hon. Mr. Portman, M. P., an intimate friend of General Wade Hampton. Mr. P. and his friends here made up another contribution, by which means he was enabled to reach St. Johns, N. B., from whence he embarked on board the schooner Blanche, on the 7th of June, and arrived at Nassau on the 24th. Mr. Bramlet is now in this city. He says he found the people of Canada, much to his astonishment, almost a unit in favor of the South. He had been led to believe that the Canadians were all abolitionists, whereas, on the contrary, he found but two during his stay, and those were Yankee traders, who had settled there on speculation. The Canadians say the free negroes are a great evil in the community. These negroes, they say, who are run into Canada by the Abolition fana
Quebec (Canada) (search for this): article 2
eans to continue his journey. Mr. Bramlet went to Sandusky, thence to Toledo, from there to Detroit, and getting on board a ferry boat was landed upon the Canadian side, at a place called Windsor, Upper Canada. There he met the Honorable Mr. Elliott, Queen's Consul, who invited him to his place at London. He was hospitably and kindly received by the citizens of that place, and a contribution made up for him. He was also given free trans port, or right of way, on the Grand Trunk Railway to Quebec, with a letter of introduction to the Hon. Mr. Portman, M. P., an intimate friend of General Wade Hampton. Mr. P. and his friends here made up another contribution, by which means he was enabled to reach St. Johns, N. B., from whence he embarked on board the schooner Blanche, on the 7th of June, and arrived at Nassau on the 24th. Mr. Bramlet is now in this city. He says he found the people of Canada, much to his astonishment, almost a unit in favor of the South. He had been led to bel
Canada (Canada) (search for this): article 2
into his limbs and made him a cripple, and that he was endeavoring to get home to his friends in Canada.--One of the laborers gave him a quarter of a dollar. With only this in his pocket, he got aboaed upon his staying till it was over. To his inquiries. Mr. Bramlet repeated the story of his Canadian birth, and said he would like to get work in order to get the means to continue his journey. Tmlet then told him he was a Southerner and a military prisoner, endeavoring to make his way into Canada. The farmer grasped his hand, said his heart was with him, but that he was a poor man, not ableved at Nassau on the 24th. Mr. Bramlet is now in this city. He says he found the people of Canada, much to his astonishment, almost a unit in favor of the South. He had been led to believe thaty the free negroes are a great evil in the community. These negroes, they say, who are run into Canada by the Abolition fanatics, are the only paupers and pauper population they have. In some places
Vistula (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 2
be able to manage with what help he had. He asked Mr. Bramlet what he could do. The reply was, anything. The proprietor scanned him very closely, and did not seem to like his appearance. Seeing he was not likely to succeed, Mr. Bramlet revealed his true condition. He was immediately welcomed in, and here he staid for two weeks, until he had wholly recovered from his lameness. The proprietor then furnished him the means to continue his journey. Mr. Bramlet went to Sandusky, thence to Toledo, from there to Detroit, and getting on board a ferry boat was landed upon the Canadian side, at a place called Windsor, Upper Canada. There he met the Honorable Mr. Elliott, Queen's Consul, who invited him to his place at London. He was hospitably and kindly received by the citizens of that place, and a contribution made up for him. He was also given free trans port, or right of way, on the Grand Trunk Railway to Quebec, with a letter of introduction to the Hon. Mr. Portman, M. P., an inti
Windsor (Canada) (search for this): article 2
ed him very closely, and did not seem to like his appearance. Seeing he was not likely to succeed, Mr. Bramlet revealed his true condition. He was immediately welcomed in, and here he staid for two weeks, until he had wholly recovered from his lameness. The proprietor then furnished him the means to continue his journey. Mr. Bramlet went to Sandusky, thence to Toledo, from there to Detroit, and getting on board a ferry boat was landed upon the Canadian side, at a place called Windsor, Upper Canada. There he met the Honorable Mr. Elliott, Queen's Consul, who invited him to his place at London. He was hospitably and kindly received by the citizens of that place, and a contribution made up for him. He was also given free trans port, or right of way, on the Grand Trunk Railway to Quebec, with a letter of introduction to the Hon. Mr. Portman, M. P., an intimate friend of General Wade Hampton. Mr. P. and his friends here made up another contribution, by which means he was enabled
Saint John's (Canada) (search for this): article 2
There he met the Honorable Mr. Elliott, Queen's Consul, who invited him to his place at London. He was hospitably and kindly received by the citizens of that place, and a contribution made up for him. He was also given free trans port, or right of way, on the Grand Trunk Railway to Quebec, with a letter of introduction to the Hon. Mr. Portman, M. P., an intimate friend of General Wade Hampton. Mr. P. and his friends here made up another contribution, by which means he was enabled to reach St. Johns, N. B., from whence he embarked on board the schooner Blanche, on the 7th of June, and arrived at Nassau on the 24th. Mr. Bramlet is now in this city. He says he found the people of Canada, much to his astonishment, almost a unit in favor of the South. He had been led to believe that the Canadians were all abolitionists, whereas, on the contrary, he found but two during his stay, and those were Yankee traders, who had settled there on speculation. The Canadians say the free negroes
Sandusky, Ohio (Ohio, United States) (search for this): article 2
s asking him for a ticket, he replied he had none, but that he wished to go to Sandusky, that he had but one dollar with him and would ride as far as that would pay. cket, he got aboard the next train, and told the conductor he wished to get to Sandusky, but had only twenty-five cents, with which he desired to go as far as possiblhis condition, kindly told him to keep his seat, and that he would take him to Sandusky. He arrived in Sandusky in the evening, without money, and in a state of Sandusky in the evening, without money, and in a state of starvation. His only clothes were the laborer's suit, ragged and dirty. A group of boys observing him, one of them cried out, "I believe that fellow is an escaped phe disclosed his true character. The Irishman had been a day or two before to Sandusky, to collect some dues of a merchant, who it seems was an Abolitionist, and whotor then furnished him the means to continue his journey. Mr. Bramlet went to Sandusky, thence to Toledo, from there to Detroit, and getting on board a ferry boat wa
ndusky, thence to Toledo, from there to Detroit, and getting on board a ferry boat was landed upon the Canadian side, at a place called Windsor, Upper Canada. There he met the Honorable Mr. Elliott, Queen's Consul, who invited him to his place at London. He was hospitably and kindly received by the citizens of that place, and a contribution made up for him. He was also given free trans port, or right of way, on the Grand Trunk Railway to Quebec, with a letter of introduction to the Hon. Mr. Portman, M. P., an intimate friend of General Wade Hampton. Mr. P. and his friends here made up another contribution, by which means he was enabled to reach St. Johns, N. B., from whence he embarked on board the schooner Blanche, on the 7th of June, and arrived at Nassau on the 24th. Mr. Bramlet is now in this city. He says he found the people of Canada, much to his astonishment, almost a unit in favor of the South. He had been led to believe that the Canadians were all abolitionists, wher
Cleveland (search for this): article 2
and would ride as far as that would pay. The conductor took his dollar and told him to get off at Crystalline Station. Walking on about a mile from this station, he stopped all night with a German, and next day walked seven miles and a half, leaving upon an elder stick, being otherwise completely broken down. He stayed that night with a young man, who shared his supper with him, and the next morning again started. Coming across some laborers working on the railroad from Columbus to Cleveland, he was asked as to his lameness. He told them that he was a Canadian by birth, had emigrated to the southern part of Ohio just before the breaking out of the war, had taken the typhoid fever, which had fallen into his limbs and made him a cripple, and that he was endeavoring to get home to his friends in Canada.--One of the laborers gave him a quarter of a dollar. With only this in his pocket, he got aboard the next train, and told the conductor he wished to get to Sandusky, but had onl
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