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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 24, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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John T. Anderson (search for this): article 1
Another cavalry Dash at the Central Railroad. A squadron of Federal cavalry numbering about two hundred, appeared on the Central railroad, at Anderson's Turn out, thirty miles from Richmond, yesterday morning, about nine o'clock. They were not quite soon enough to intercept the westward bound mail train, which had passed some fifteen minutes before their arrival. They remained there two hours and then returned towards Fredericksburg, taking with them as prisoner a son of Mr. John T. AnderMr. John T. Anderson, (a member of the Hanover troop, who was at home on sick furlough,) and four horses which they stole from Mr. A. We have been informed that a company of Confederate cavalry, stationed near the turn out, left in great haste on the approach of the Yankees, leaving their camp equipage behind but in regard to this we have no definite particulars. The news of the enemy's appearance on the road soon spread through the country, and the conductor of the town mail train left the passengers at Freder
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 2
Affairs in Eastern North Carolina. A gentleman, who arrived here yesterday from North Carolina, informs us that a report was current there of a rebellion among the runaway negroes on Roanoke Island, that having become restless under the rule of self-constituted masters, they stole upon the Yankees while at dinner and put several of them to death; and that as soon as the soldiers were able to recover from the suddenness of the attack, they rallied and commenced an indiscriminate slaughter oNorth Carolina, informs us that a report was current there of a rebellion among the runaway negroes on Roanoke Island, that having become restless under the rule of self-constituted masters, they stole upon the Yankees while at dinner and put several of them to death; and that as soon as the soldiers were able to recover from the suddenness of the attack, they rallied and commenced an indiscriminate slaughter of the negroes, which resulted in their almost total extermination. There seems to be some ground for believing this report for we have information from a high military source that the negroes in the neighborhood of Roanoke Island are leaving by every opportunity and endeavoring to make their way to our lines. We also learn that heavy cannonading was heard at Goldsboro', N. C., on Monday afternoon, in the direction of Newbern. It commenced at 3 o'clock, and continued until 9 o'clock P. M.
Goldsboro (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 2
le of self-constituted masters, they stole upon the Yankees while at dinner and put several of them to death; and that as soon as the soldiers were able to recover from the suddenness of the attack, they rallied and commenced an indiscriminate slaughter of the negroes, which resulted in their almost total extermination. There seems to be some ground for believing this report for we have information from a high military source that the negroes in the neighborhood of Roanoke Island are leaving by every opportunity and endeavoring to make their way to our lines. We also learn that heavy cannonading was heard at Goldsboro', N. C., on Monday afternoon, in the direction of Newbern. It commenced at 3 o'clock, and continued until 9 o'clock P. M. Since there is no probability that the Yankees would fire such an extensive salute in honor of the anniversary of the battle of Manassas, the impression prevailed that the enemy was engaged in shelling some defenceless point in that vicinity.
New Bern (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 2
le of self-constituted masters, they stole upon the Yankees while at dinner and put several of them to death; and that as soon as the soldiers were able to recover from the suddenness of the attack, they rallied and commenced an indiscriminate slaughter of the negroes, which resulted in their almost total extermination. There seems to be some ground for believing this report for we have information from a high military source that the negroes in the neighborhood of Roanoke Island are leaving by every opportunity and endeavoring to make their way to our lines. We also learn that heavy cannonading was heard at Goldsboro', N. C., on Monday afternoon, in the direction of Newbern. It commenced at 3 o'clock, and continued until 9 o'clock P. M. Since there is no probability that the Yankees would fire such an extensive salute in honor of the anniversary of the battle of Manassas, the impression prevailed that the enemy was engaged in shelling some defenceless point in that vicinity.
Roanoke Island (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 2
Affairs in Eastern North Carolina. A gentleman, who arrived here yesterday from North Carolina, informs us that a report was current there of a rebellion among the runaway negroes on Roanoke Island, that having become restless under the rule of self-constituted masters, they stole upon the Yankees while at dinner and put several of them to death; and that as soon as the soldiers were able to recover from the suddenness of the attack, they rallied and commenced an indiscriminate slaughter of the negroes, which resulted in their almost total extermination. There seems to be some ground for believing this report for we have information from a high military source that the negroes in the neighborhood of Roanoke Island are leaving by every opportunity and endeavoring to make their way to our lines. We also learn that heavy cannonading was heard at Goldsboro', N. C., on Monday afternoon, in the direction of Newbern. It commenced at 3 o'clock, and continued until 9 o'clock P. M.
McClellan (search for this): article 3
The enemy's movements. A party of the enemy's cavalry, on Monday last made a visit to New Kent Court-House, twenty- eight miles below Richmond. The object was probably to reconnoitre the country, as we have not learned that they committed any further depredations upon a people whom they had previously robbed of a vast amount of property. While McClellan continues his preparations on James river for another advance towards Richmond, his cavalry will scour the Peninsula in the direction of Williamsburg for information respecting any apprehended movement of the Confederate forces.
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 3
The enemy's movements. A party of the enemy's cavalry, on Monday last made a visit to New Kent Court-House, twenty- eight miles below Richmond. The object was probably to reconnoitre the country, as we have not learned that they committed any further depredations upon a people whom they had previously robbed of a vast amount of property. While McClellan continues his preparations on James river for another advance towards Richmond, his cavalry will scour the Peninsula in the direction of Williamsburg for information respecting any apprehended movement of the Confederate forces.
is city, arrived at City Point between 5 and 6 o'clock. The U. S. steamer S. R. Spaulding and two transports were waiting to receive the men, who were placed on board without unnecessary delay. A proposition was made by the Yankee officials to Dr. Cullen, the surgeon in charge of the paroled prisoners, to send to Richmond a cargo of provisions for the benefit of their sick and wounded still remaining here, but he properly declined to authorize any such proceeding. They then offered to send theon was made by the Yankee officials to Dr. Cullen, the surgeon in charge of the paroled prisoners, to send to Richmond a cargo of provisions for the benefit of their sick and wounded still remaining here, but he properly declined to authorize any such proceeding. They then offered to send them with the understanding that they be distributed to Confederate and Federal soldiers alike, and this proposition has probably been submitted through Dr. Cullen to the commanding General of our army here.
City Point (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 4
The flag of truce. The train which left Petersburg on Tuesday afternoon conveying 625 wounded and sick prisoners of war, from this city, arrived at City Point between 5 and 6 o'clock. The U. S. steamer S. R. Spaulding and two transports were waiting to receive the men, who were placed on board without unnecessary delay. A proposition was made by the Yankee officials to Dr. Cullen, the surgeon in charge of the paroled prisoners, to send to Richmond a cargo of provisions for the benefit of their sick and wounded still remaining here, but he properly declined to authorize any such proceeding. They then offered to send them with the understanding that they be distributed to Confederate and Federal soldiers alike, and this proposition has probably been submitted through Dr. Cullen to the commanding General of our army here.
July 16th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 5
ortant explanation in relation to the status of the Partisan Rangers, and clearly states what will be expected in their behalf in the event of capture by the enemy. Senator Clarke also makes an inquiry concerning the treatment to be demanded in behalf of private citizens of the Confederate States captured while making resistance to any attempt of the enemy to invade their domicils. The reply of the Secretary is as follows: Confederate States of America. War Department,Richmond, July 16th, 1862. Hon. John B. Clarke,C. S. Senate.Sir --I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 15th inst, and to reply that Partisan Rangers are a part of the Provisional army of the Confederate States, subject to all the regulations adopted for its government, and entitled to the same protection as prisoners of war; Partisan Rangers are in no respect different from troops of the line, except that they are not brigaded, and are employed oftener on detached service. They
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