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John Barnes (search for this): article 1
says he has come to protect the citizens against insults and ruling despotism. They claim to be regular soldiers, not guerrillas. Some commissary stores, belonging to the Government, were captured, and a few soldiers taken. Newburg, ten miles above Evansville, is also in possession of the rebels. News from Tennessee. Nashville, July 16 --Lebanon, Tenn., is in possession of the rebels. The rebels, 800 strong, are at Hartsville. Dr. Rice, Benjamin Daniels, and John Barnes, respectable citizens, were hung last night at Tennessee Ridge, twenty-five miles from Nashville, for entertaining men employed in reconstructing telegraph lines. Nashville,July 18--One thousand and forty-six paroled prisoners at Murfreesboro' have arrived. They are mostly of the Michigan Ninth, and some of Hewitt's Battery. There are no commissioned officers. The trains run through to Murfreesboro'. Running the blockade. United States Gunboat Chippewa, Captain Bryson,
ing the offensive. Then Morgan turned east, crossed the Kentucky river at Saryock's Station, and marched to Versailles, which is about equidistant from Franklin and Lexington. There he stayed Monday night. Finding the coast clear, he next day moved north to Midway Station, on the Louisville and Lexington Railroad, tore up the track and destroyed the Elkhorn bridge, while his advance guard, passing by Georgetown, made a sudden dash on the Kentucky Central Road, destroyed a bridge and burned Keyser's extensive distillery, between Paris and Cynthiana, thus completely cutting Lexington off from its northern and western communications. --His exploits seem to have been arose familiar to Cincinnati than to those of us who were at Lexington. Morgan's great objects in this raid into Kentucky have been panic among the people and indecision among military managers. He has, in fact, kept every considerable place in Central Kentucky in a state of sledge, and frantically calling for assistan
ent, if massed, to pursue, rout, and disperse his gang, are squatted down on the hills about Frankfort and Lexington, John slips between, destroys bridges and interrupts communications. Why, when at Versailles, his men so fagged out that they slept in the streets, with their horses' bridles on their arms, was not a movement made simultaneously from Frankfort, Lexington, and Nicholasville? At the first-named place were the Eighty-fifth Ohio, Col. Sowers; the Fifty fifth Indiana battalion, Col. Mohen; two or three pieces of artillery, quite a body of regular troops, and mounted men sufficient for scouting and flanking purposes. Brigadier General Ward was at Lexington with a force of not less than 1,500 men, probably 2,000, and there were 300 at Nicholasville, irregular troops, it is true, but men in earnest in defence not over fourteen miles, and cars might have been employed, if necessary, to transport troops a portion of the way. It was proposed, and might have been successfully exe
unded the soldier. In the confusion the would be murderers escaped, but the woman, together with some of her most prominent sympathizers, were conveyed before Gen. Shepley, at the City Hall. Upon being brought into the presence of General Shepley, she commenced the utterance of threats and abuse, and further took out of her General Shepley, she commenced the utterance of threats and abuse, and further took out of her bosom innumerable bits of paper, on which were written insulting epithets, addressed to the United States authorities, and one by one thrust them into General Shepley's hand. After some few questions she was put in a carriage and conveyed to General Butler's headquarters, where she was recognized as the mistress of a gambler and mGeneral Shepley's hand. After some few questions she was put in a carriage and conveyed to General Butler's headquarters, where she was recognized as the mistress of a gambler and murderer, now, by General Butler's orders, confined at Fort Jackson, but nominally passing as the wife of one John H. Larue.--The result of the examination was as follows: Headq'rs Department of the Gulf,New Orleans July 10, 1862 Special Order No. 179,--John H. Larne, being by his own confession a vagrant, a person without
L. A. Hagans Secretary (search for this): article 1
t I do not doubt that you will voluntarily respond to this call, and fly to assist your brave brethren in this last struggle for home, country, and constitutional freedom, and secure forever, to ourselves and to our children, the priceless legacy bequeathed us by our fathers. Your sister States are nobly responding by voluntary enlistment. Let it not be said that it was left for Virginia to furnish her quota by resorting to a draft. F. H. Pierpoint, Governor. By the Governor: L. A. Hagans Secretary of the Commonwealth. Yankee account of the Arkansas. Cairo, July 21 --The dispatch boat, which arrived at Memphis on Saturday, brings the following: The reported escape of the rebel plated battery Arkansas is correct. The affair took place on the morning of the 15th. That morning, in consequence of reports brought by refugees that the Arkansas was about to attempt to run by the Union fleet, the gunboats Carondelet and Tyler and ram Lancaster started up the Yazoo
A. R. Johnson (search for this): article 1
e time the Federals are ready to move Morgan will be on his retreat and a hundred or two hundred miles from here. The Raids of the guerrillas. Cairo July 19 --The steamer General Anderson, from Evansville, has arrived. She passed Henderson, Ky., yesterday forenoon. The rebels had possession of the town. They say they don't intend to interfere with navigation on the river, except Government boats, nor with private property. The number of rebels is not ascertained. Lt. A. R. Johnson, of Bridewell's Tennessee Cavalry, in command, has issued a proclamation, in which he says he has come to protect the citizens against insults and ruling despotism. They claim to be regular soldiers, not guerrillas. Some commissary stores, belonging to the Government, were captured, and a few soldiers taken. Newburg, ten miles above Evansville, is also in possession of the rebels. News from Tennessee. Nashville, July 16 --Lebanon, Tenn., is in possession of the rebe
Benjamin Daniels (search for this): article 1
amation, in which he says he has come to protect the citizens against insults and ruling despotism. They claim to be regular soldiers, not guerrillas. Some commissary stores, belonging to the Government, were captured, and a few soldiers taken. Newburg, ten miles above Evansville, is also in possession of the rebels. News from Tennessee. Nashville, July 16 --Lebanon, Tenn., is in possession of the rebels. The rebels, 800 strong, are at Hartsville. Dr. Rice, Benjamin Daniels, and John Barnes, respectable citizens, were hung last night at Tennessee Ridge, twenty-five miles from Nashville, for entertaining men employed in reconstructing telegraph lines. Nashville,July 18--One thousand and forty-six paroled prisoners at Murfreesboro' have arrived. They are mostly of the Michigan Ninth, and some of Hewitt's Battery. There are no commissioned officers. The trains run through to Murfreesboro'. Running the blockade. United States Gunboat Chippew
hes have also been taken for the use of the army. The large hotel at Warrenton Springs, and the adjoining cottages, are being fitted up for hospitals. Two thousand sick can easily be accommodated. The grounds and springs surrounding the hotels and cottages are said to be finer than any watering place in the whole country, and all the leading physicians in the army of Gen. Pope are of the opinion that not one half so many deaths will occur here as in the hospitals at Washington. Drs. Magruder, Moseley and Banks have immediate charge of the sick at this point, and are unremitting in their attentions to them. A courier, with dispatches from Gen. Hatch to Gen. Banks, was drowned in attempting to cross the Rappahannock last Friday night. The Rapidan and Rappahannock have fallen so that our supply trains now have no difficulty in crossing them. The telegraphic lines were completed to Sperryville to-day. Gen. Pope now has telegraphic communication with his three army corps.
d clothing will be required for our sick and wounded soldiers, and that all the unoccupied rooms in their mansions, and, if necessary, the entire buildings, will be used as hospitals. Col. Meyers, of McDowell's staff, to-day took possession of Dr. Bacon's large female seminary. Dr. Bacon strongly protested against its use by the army, but Col. Meyers told him he must not expect to enjoy secession and all the other luxuries of the season at the same time. Our sick and wounded soldiers nowDr. Bacon strongly protested against its use by the army, but Col. Meyers told him he must not expect to enjoy secession and all the other luxuries of the season at the same time. Our sick and wounded soldiers now occupy the rooms but a few weeks since graced by the fair F. F. V. rebels. The Episcopal, Presbyterian, Baptist and Methodist Churches have also been taken for the use of the army. The large hotel at Warrenton Springs, and the adjoining cottages, are being fitted up for hospitals. Two thousand sick can easily be accommodated. The grounds and springs surrounding the hotels and cottages are said to be finer than any watering place in the whole country, and all the leading physicians in t
A solid shot from Farragut's gunboat No. 6 struck her larboard bow, passing through and under her plating, ripping it off for a considerable distance. What further damage was done is not ascertained. The injuries to our fleet are light. The Benton received a shot near the edge of the after part of the larboard sid, killing one man. The Tyler, which engaged the Arkansas nearly an hour and a half, had seven killed and nine wounded. Among the latter were the pilots Messrs. Sebastian and Hiner, and Engineer Davis. The ram Lancaster received a shot under her boilers, causing an escape of hot water, scalding six men, three of them fatally. The entire Union loss is twelve killed and fifteen wounded, five or six of whom will die. The rebel loss is not known, but believed to be considerable, as the hot water streams of the Carondelet, at the time they attempted to board, were thrown directly into her. From Gen. Pope's army — Occupation of Charlottesville — important rebel c
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