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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: July 30, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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North Anna (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 7
From the North. From our latest Northern papers we make up the following summary of news: The raid of the Yankees on the Central Railroad. The New York Herald has a long account of the raid of the Federal troops on the Central Railroad. It thinks it the most brilliant dash of the season. A participant in it writes: Dispatches of last week in the telegraph office stated that great suffering prevailed for want of supplies, and that as soon as the bridge over the North Anna river was rebuilt provisions would be furnished. The bridge is just completed, and new the destruction of the track, water stations, &c., will delay them some time longer, while it compels them to guard the whole line of road with infantry — an operation which will weaken their forces not a little. Its effects upon the minds of the rebels must have been startling if not terrifying. It is evident that they never dreamed of our venturing so far, and, in fancied security, were sending train after tr
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 7
tell precisely what use will be made of them — in other words, whether the new defences which it is proposed to construct are designed to protect us in our present position, or to assist in resuming the advance to Richmond. I venture the opinion, however, that the Richmond Enquirer, which thinks that McClellan means to "dig his way" to the Confederate capital, is substantially correct. These tools are not needed in our camp at present. Unless the Confederates succeed in obstructing the James river below us, which it is not believed here can be accomplished, though strenuous efforts are making to render navigation dangerous, the picks and shovels and other instruments we have received need never be used here. Our camps are so situated that the gunboats can shell the Confederates far over our heads, and while they are too far away to do us particular harm, whatever their numbers; besides, our vast artillery, protected by strong earth-works, would play havoc among them, and perhaps k
Mexico (Mexico) (search for this): article 7
the Emperor a recognition of the South, favored the increase of the expedition, and laid down the theory that the North was so tired of the war, and so far away from the end they had set out to attain, that if France, with a formidable force in Mexican waters as a menace, would recognize the South, the North would seize this as a pretext to voluntarily relax the blockade so far as to allow the exist of cotton, and perhaps even to make peace with the South. Now, although it is almost imposmme in Mexico, if this latter should turn out true, are sufficient to create uneminess and put one on the alert. It is hardly possible that the Minister of the Interior would show such an active zeal all at once in the direction of the Press on Mexican matters if it were not to conform to a programme of the Government. Digging into Richmond. A letter from McClellan's camp says the most noticeable fact there just now is the arrival of a vast amount of entrenching tools. It adds:
Milford (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): article 7
ontributed to the Government out and out, from our private purse, and without any gun or ship contracts whatever. But the best of this rich like is that Mr. Aspinwall is said to have made more money than Morgan by buying and selling ships for the Government. The twenty-five thousand dollars profit on his gun contracts Mr. Aspinwall returns to Government, but the one hundred thousand dollars profit upon his Government ship operations he puts in his own pocket. Can't see it. The Newark (N. J.) Journal can't see how the Federal Government knows the Confederate losses to a-man but can't tell its own loses. It says: Retreating from an advancing foe, so rapidity that we are compelled to leave our dead and dying in the enemy's hands, our troops are reported as knowing to a fraction the number of men killed of the enemy. Have we any kind of shell or ball that, whenever it strikes down a Confederate, reports the fact within our camp ? If not, how is it that we obtain so soon
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): article 7
their press, or by a recognition of the South, they can manage to open the cotton ports; but I do not believe that they have gone further than to fix upon this as an eventuality that may arrive in the future, and for which their fleet and army in Mexico will be ready in case of need. I have never believed, for a moment. that there was any danger of the intervention of France between the two contending sect one in the United States, and find it difficult new to admit that the Emperor and M. Tho have any idea of an intervention; but M. De Persigny's known hostility to the North, taken in connection with the singular manner in which he is trying for a few days past to shape public opinion through the press, and the change of programme in Mexico, if this latter should turn out true, are sufficient to create uneminess and put one on the alert. It is hardly possible that the Minister of the Interior would show such an active zeal all at once in the direction of the Press on Mexican matter
United States (United States) (search for this): article 7
s only in its greater ignorance of the questions it treats. Now it may be that the French Government has come to the conclusion that the Government of the United States is weak and exhausted, and that, while professing to be central, they can bully us through their official and semi-official journals — for here, where the press is a responsible agent, it is quite another thing from the press in England or the United States--and that by the menaces of their press, or by a recognition of the South, they can manage to open the cotton ports; but I do not believe that they have gone further than to fix upon this as an eventuality that may arrive in the futuready in case of need. I have never believed, for a moment. that there was any danger of the intervention of France between the two contending sect one in the United States, and find it difficult new to admit that the Emperor and M. Thouvenal have any idea of an intervention; but M. De Persigny's known hostility to the North, take
Luray (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 7
. Information as to disloyal persons is solicited by the Department from all will citizens. Presentations for the murder of Southern citizens. The following is a most atrocious order, issued by Gen. inwehr, commanding the remaining Federate in the Valley: Hdq'rs Second Division,Groen's Farm, July 13, 1862. Special Order No. 6. Major W. Steadman, commanding 6th regiment Ohio volunteer cavalry, will cause the arrest of five (5) of the prominent citizens of Luray, Page county, Va., send them to these headquarters (with an hostages. They will be held as long as we in this vicinity. They will share my table, and as friends; but, for every one of our soldiers who may be shot by "bushwhackers" one of these hostages will suffer death, unless the perpetrators of the deed are delivered to me. It is well known that these so-called "bushwhackers" are inhabitants of the district, and encouraged in the cowardly acts by the prominent citizens here. You will l
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 7
our National power? Why should the people every now and then be brought to the verge of despair by the news of disaster, and our army be stopped or turned back in its victorious march? Why should not the tremendous strength that slumbers in the nation's arm be at once pat forth, to the destruction of its foes? Realizing the fact. The New York Tribune says: It is impossible to read the accounts of the recent daring and successful Confederate raids in the very heart of both Tennessee and Kentucky, directly in the rear of the main body of General Halleck's army, and under the full operation of Order No. 3, without realizing that the mass of the whites in the regions thus overrun are either adverse to the Union cause or paralyzed by indifference or cowardice. A Yankee view of the Probability of intervention. The Paris correspondent of the New York Times writes thus, July 7th, about intervention: M. de Persigny, who was at Saturday's council for the first
France (France) (search for this): article 7
end boldly and without hesitation to the Emperor a recognition of the South, favored the increase of the expedition, and laid down the theory that the North was so tired of the war, and so far away from the end they had set out to attain, that if France, with a formidable force in Mexican waters as a menace, would recognize the South, the North would seize this as a pretext to voluntarily relax the blockade so far as to allow the exist of cotton, and perhaps even to make peace with the South. one further than to fix upon this as an eventuality that may arrive in the future, and for which their fleet and army in Mexico will be ready in case of need. I have never believed, for a moment. that there was any danger of the intervention of France between the two contending sect one in the United States, and find it difficult new to admit that the Emperor and M. Thouvenal have any idea of an intervention; but M. De Persigny's known hostility to the North, taken in connection with the singu
A. Strinwehr (search for this): article 7
held as long as we in this vicinity. They will share my table, and as friends; but, for every one of our soldiers who may be shot by "bushwhackers" one of these hostages will suffer death, unless the perpetrators of the deed are delivered to me. It is well known that these so-called "bushwhackers" are inhabitants of the district, and encouraged in the cowardly acts by the prominent citizens here. You will leave a copy of this order with the family of each man arrested by you. A. Strinwehr, Mg. General com'g 2d division. Blown us own Tromps. Bennett, of the is determined not to let his light be hid un a bushels In nothing aspinwall's gift to the United States Government of $25,000--his profit on a contract — Sawsey says: Why, this is not so liberal a donation as the three thousand dollars and one year's service of the Henrietta, which we contributed to the Government out and out, from our private purse, and without any gun or ship contracts whateve
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