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Queenstown, Md. (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 11
From Europe.arrival of the Australasian.Important debate in Parliament on intervention.Mr. Lindsay's motion Quashed by Lord Palmerston. The Cunard steamship Australasian, which left Liverpool on the 19th of July, and Queenstown on the 20th, arrived at New York on the morning of the 30th. Her news is three days later than previous advices. Debate in the House of Commons on intervention. In the House of Commons, on the 18th of July, Mr. Clay made an appeal to Mr. Lindsey to postpone his motion with respect to mediation in the civil war in America. At any time it would be a question that should be cautiously dealt with, but especially when there was a rumor of the total defect of the Federal army. Mr. J. Ewart cordially seconded the appeal. Mr. Lindsay said that he had so often postponed his motion that, at this late period of the session, he did not think that he should be doing his duty if he deferred it any longer. He then moved the following resolution:
Belgium (Belgium) (search for this): article 11
ot conquest, was the cause of the war. The conflicting interests of the North and South rendered the desire of the latter to secede extremely profitable, but that was not the question. The South had seceded for reasons which were perfectly justifiable. It had established and maintained a de facts government, and it had been the practice of this Government to recognize de facts governments. In less than twelve months a Whig Government, because it had suited its purpose, had recognized Belgium, and it would not do to say that the civil war was still raging in America for the were on the point of subduing the brave Red- gians, and we did more than recognize that Kingdom. In strict conformity with our practice and international law, Lord Castlereagh and Mr. Canning recognized Greece and Spanish Colonies in America, and they were supported by Sir James Macintosh, at that recognition was not inconsistent, but in accordance with a strict centrality. The United States reco
Cunard (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 11
From Europe.arrival of the Australasian.Important debate in Parliament on intervention.Mr. Lindsay's motion Quashed by Lord Palmerston. The Cunard steamship Australasian, which left Liverpool on the 19th of July, and Queenstown on the 20th, arrived at New York on the morning of the 30th. Her news is three days later than previous advices. Debate in the House of Commons on intervention. In the House of Commons, on the 18th of July, Mr. Clay made an appeal to Mr. Lindsey to postpone his motion with respect to mediation in the civil war in America. At any time it would be a question that should be cautiously dealt with, but especially when there was a rumor of the total defect of the Federal army. Mr. J. Ewart cordially seconded the appeal. Mr. Lindsay said that he had so often postponed his motion that, at this late period of the session, he did not think that he should be doing his duty if he deferred it any longer. He then moved the following resolution:
Sunderland (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 11
es. He begged to assure the noble Lord and the House that he did not stand here as the advocate and mouthpiece of the Northern Government. He looked at the question purely from an English point of view. No man more deeply deplored than himself the evils caused by the war, both here and in America, and no prepossession in favor of either party would prevent him from supporting any feasible mode of putting an end to them. He believed, however, that the motion of the honorable member from Sunderland, so far from staying the war, would rather aggravate and prolong it, and possibly drag us into it; and he earnestly trusted that we would persevere in the principle and policy of entire non-intervention.--(Hear, hear)* * * * Were we in the position of the Federal--take the case of the war in India — if an offer of mediation had been made, accompanied by a threat — if France had stood forward and said, this contest can end only in separation — should we not have considered it an insult<
Sonora (California, United States) (search for this): article 11
urse they have pursued with the Northern army. The Princess Clothilde gave birth to a Prince on the 18th. The Paris Bourse was dull; Rents 68 36s. The Continental political news is unimportant. It was reported in London that the Confederates had intimated to the English Charge d'affaires at Washington that any offer of mediation by England would meet with respectful attention. The Paris Patris says that the United States Government has offered to purchase the province of Sonora for $6,000,000. The "Thunderer's" last canard. The London Times, of Friday, published a third edition, containing the following canard: "Baltimore, July 3.--A communication from Fortress Monroe, dated the 2d, states that Generals Gorman and Meade had arrived there wounded.--They state that the divisions of Generals McCati and Reynolds had surrendered to the Confederate. "General McClellan was on board the Galena.--General Jackson was in the rear of the Federal, and Price i
England (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 11
, he drew a fearful picture of the horrors of the war, and urged that for the sake of humanity they should be arrested, and that both politically and commercially a separation of the Union would be for the benefit of this country. Mr. Lindsay Rebuked. Mr. Taylor considered the course taken by the honorable member for Sunderland to be ill-judged, inopportune, and calculated to increase the feelings of bitterness and irritation which already prevailed in the Northern States towards Great Britain. He complained that the sympathy of the English public had been enlisted by the press in favor of the Confederate States, altogether ignoring the cause of slavery, which tainted those States and their institutions. The North, it was not to be denied, had recently met with considerable reverses, but, in his opinion, it was impossible, and contrary to all experience of the past, that twenty millions of people could be successfully resisted by five millions. The one was superior in every
Fortress Monroe (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 11
It was reported in London that the Confederates had intimated to the English Charge d'affaires at Washington that any offer of mediation by England would meet with respectful attention. The Paris Patris says that the United States Government has offered to purchase the province of Sonora for $6,000,000. The "Thunderer's" last canard. The London Times, of Friday, published a third edition, containing the following canard: "Baltimore, July 3.--A communication from Fortress Monroe, dated the 2d, states that Generals Gorman and Meade had arrived there wounded.--They state that the divisions of Generals McCati and Reynolds had surrendered to the Confederate. "General McClellan was on board the Galena.--General Jackson was in the rear of the Federal, and Price in front. General Lee refuses to grant any terms of capitulation, and demands their unconditional surrender. The Federal flags have been taken down from the newspaper offices in Baltimore." The abo
United States (United States) (search for this): article 11
he opinion of this House the States which have seceded from the Union of the republic of the United States have so long maintained themselves under a separate and established Government, and have givned that the sympathy of the English public had been enlisted by the press in favor of the Confederate States, altogether ignoring the cause of slavery, which tainted those States and their institutio that recognition was not inconsistent, but in accordance with a strict centrality. The United States recognized the Spanish Republic some time before England did, because, as alleged, their intSpain --The Federal Government was not, therefore, entitled to resent a recognition of the Confederate States, which he contended, precedent, practice, international law, and every political and commervention, but of impartial neutrality. Mr. Gregory warmly supported the course of the Confederate States. He alleged that every pretext with which the North commenced the war had utterly failed,
France (France) (search for this): article 11
y feasible mode of putting an end to them. He believed, however, that the motion of the honorable member from Sunderland, so far from staying the war, would rather aggravate and prolong it, and possibly drag us into it; and he earnestly trusted that we would persevere in the principle and policy of entire non-intervention.--(Hear, hear)* * * * Were we in the position of the Federal--take the case of the war in India — if an offer of mediation had been made, accompanied by a threat — if France had stood forward and said, this contest can end only in separation — should we not have considered it an insult, and, instead of bringing us to peace, would it not much more likely have tended to aggravate the war? If we wanted this war to be prosecuted by the men of the North with greater fury, we could not go to work more ingeniously to attain our end. Again, if any disturbance arose in Ireland — if a contest were going on there, and if another power stepped in, saying to us, "Let
Lancaster (United Kingdom) (search for this): article 11
had no occus belli against America, where would be the justification of our going to war with her? Were we to go to war with any country because we happened to be in disaster on account of what was occurring in that country? Not only would such a war be wicked and unjust, but foolish to the greatest possible degree. It was said that our population was starving, and he believed that the cotton famine at this moment was likely to get worse. But we could keep the working population of Lancashire in luxury for less than the price it would cost us to interfere as the noble Lord opposite suggested. We had a cotton famine now, but if we did that we should stand in danger of a corn famine. Even if we were to enter into such a war, and to break all the rules of international law, on the ground of mere interest, because we could not get a certain commodity, then we ought to take our material interest in all its bearings, and see whether we should not lose more than we should gain by it
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