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Meadow Bluff (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 14
The last cavalry Dash. capture of Summerville — the seizure of prisoners — stores burned — capture of Rucker, &c., &c. [Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] The following may be relied on as embracing the material facts of the daring brilliant, and successful scout made by Major George Jackson's squadron of cavalry into the county of Nicholas, and forty-five miles in rear of the Yankee camp now at Meadow Bluff, Greenbrier county: The squadron was commanded by Major R. A. Baily, of the 22d Virginia regiment, in the absence of Major Jackson, and consisted of a portion of the companies of Capt. Bouldin's Charlotte, Capt. Gipson's Rockbridge, Capt. Cochran's Churchville, Augusta, and Capt. Lackey's Valley cavalry, 150 men in all. Setting out from their camp, near Union, Monroe county, on the morning of the 23d inst., taking a circuitous route, and passing in rear of the enemy, they halted for the night at the foot of Little Sewell mountain. On the next mornin<
Nicholas County (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 14
The last cavalry Dash. capture of Summerville — the seizure of prisoners — stores burned — capture of Rucker, &c., &c. [Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] The following may be relied on as embracing the material facts of the daring brilliant, and successful scout made by Major George Jackson's squadron of cavalry into the county of Nicholas, and forty-five miles in rear of the Yankee camp now at Meadow Bluff, Greenbrier county: The squadron was commanded by Major R. A. Baily, of the 22d Virginia regiment, in the absence of Major Jackson, and consisted of a portion of the companies of Capt. Bouldin's Charlotte, Capt. Gipson's Rockbridge, Capt. Cochran's Churchville, Augusta, and Capt. Lackey's Valley cavalry, 150 men in all. Setting out from their camp, near Union, Monroe county, on the morning of the 23d inst., taking a circuitous route, and passing in rear of the enemy, they halted for the night at the foot of Little Sewell mountain. On the next morning<
Little Sewell Mountain (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 14
squadron was commanded by Major R. A. Baily, of the 22d Virginia regiment, in the absence of Major Jackson, and consisted of a portion of the companies of Capt. Bouldin's Charlotte, Capt. Gipson's Rockbridge, Capt. Cochran's Churchville, Augusta, and Capt. Lackey's Valley cavalry, 150 men in all. Setting out from their camp, near Union, Monroe county, on the morning of the 23d inst., taking a circuitous route, and passing in rear of the enemy, they halted for the night at the foot of Little Sewell mountain. On the next morning they proceeded on and reached the Wilderness road, and after night rested for a few hours at a point ten miles from Summerville, the county seat of Nicholas. At this place was a quantity of the stores of the enemy, and also a part of two companies, (126 men,) under the command of Lieut. Col. W. C. Starr, of the 9th Va. (Yankee) regiment, as a guard. Having ascertained the precise locality of the force in the village and the headquarters of the officers, (all b
Union, Monroe County (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 14
e Jackson's squadron of cavalry into the county of Nicholas, and forty-five miles in rear of the Yankee camp now at Meadow Bluff, Greenbrier county: The squadron was commanded by Major R. A. Baily, of the 22d Virginia regiment, in the absence of Major Jackson, and consisted of a portion of the companies of Capt. Bouldin's Charlotte, Capt. Gipson's Rockbridge, Capt. Cochran's Churchville, Augusta, and Capt. Lackey's Valley cavalry, 150 men in all. Setting out from their camp, near Union, Monroe county, on the morning of the 23d inst., taking a circuitous route, and passing in rear of the enemy, they halted for the night at the foot of Little Sewell mountain. On the next morning they proceeded on and reached the Wilderness road, and after night rested for a few hours at a point ten miles from Summerville, the county seat of Nicholas. At this place was a quantity of the stores of the enemy, and also a part of two companies, (126 men,) under the command of Lieut. Col. W. C. Starr, o
Covington (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 14
last, with the prisoners, after five days absence and a travel of nearly 200 miles, going and returning, Major Bailey was most heartily congratulated by the General for his success. These are the first laurels won by Major Bailey in the cavalry service, having served heretofore in infantry, where he was highly esteemed for his gentlemanly and soldierly qualities. In the same room with Col. Starr, at the time of his capture, was found secreted under a sofa the notorious Dr. Rucker, of Covington, Allegheny county, who was also taken, and a special guard placed over him for his safe-keeping. He is the same vile person who ran off to the Yankees in 1861, and who led them into his own county in their late raid in the month of May, when they burned the Virginia Central Railroad bridge over the Cow Pasture river, for the purpose, it is believed, of emptying the vials of the wrath of his malignant heart upon the heads of those citizens who had incurred his displeasure, and who were rob
Westmoreland County (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 14
prisoners, after five days absence and a travel of nearly 200 miles, going and returning, Major Bailey was most heartily congratulated by the General for his success. These are the first laurels won by Major Bailey in the cavalry service, having served heretofore in infantry, where he was highly esteemed for his gentlemanly and soldierly qualities. In the same room with Col. Starr, at the time of his capture, was found secreted under a sofa the notorious Dr. Rucker, of Covington, Allegheny county, who was also taken, and a special guard placed over him for his safe-keeping. He is the same vile person who ran off to the Yankees in 1861, and who led them into his own county in their late raid in the month of May, when they burned the Virginia Central Railroad bridge over the Cow Pasture river, for the purpose, it is believed, of emptying the vials of the wrath of his malignant heart upon the heads of those citizens who had incurred his displeasure, and who were robbed at his spec
George Nicholas (search for this): article 14
. Gipson's Rockbridge, Capt. Cochran's Churchville, Augusta, and Capt. Lackey's Valley cavalry, 150 men in all. Setting out from their camp, near Union, Monroe county, on the morning of the 23d inst., taking a circuitous route, and passing in rear of the enemy, they halted for the night at the foot of Little Sewell mountain. On the next morning they proceeded on and reached the Wilderness road, and after night rested for a few hours at a point ten miles from Summerville, the county seat of Nicholas. At this place was a quantity of the stores of the enemy, and also a part of two companies, (126 men,) under the command of Lieut. Col. W. C. Starr, of the 9th Va. (Yankee) regiment, as a guard. Having ascertained the precise locality of the force in the village and the headquarters of the officers, (all being quartered in houses,) the plan of attack was fixed upon.--A detail of 12 men, three from each of the companies, in charge of Lieut. Francisco, of the Churchville cavalry, were to ac
[Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] The following may be relied on as embracing the material facts of the daring brilliant, and successful scout made by Major George Jackson's squadron of cavalry into the county of Nicholas, and forty-five miles in rear of the Yankee camp now at Meadow Bluff, Greenbrier county: The squadron was commanded by Major R. A. Baily, of the 22d Virginia regiment, in the absence of Major Jackson, and consisted of a portion of the companies of Capt. Bouldin's Charlotte, Capt. Gipson's Rockbridge, Capt. Cochran's Churchville, Augusta, and Capt. Lackey's Valley cavalry, 150 men in all. Setting out from their camp, near Union, Monroe county, on the morning of the 23d inst., taking a circuitous route, and passing in rear of the enemy, they halted for the night at the foot of Little Sewell mountain. On the next morning they proceeded on and reached the Wilderness road, and after night rested for a few hours at a point ten miles from Summerville
George Jackson (search for this): article 14
the seizure of prisoners — stores burned — capture of Rucker, &c., &c. [Correspondence of the Richmond Dispatch.] The following may be relied on as embracing the material facts of the daring brilliant, and successful scout made by Major George Jackson's squadron of cavalry into the county of Nicholas, and forty-five miles in rear of the Yankee camp now at Meadow Bluff, Greenbrier county: The squadron was commanded by Major R. A. Baily, of the 22d Virginia regiment, in the absence of Major Jackson, and consisted of a portion of the companies of Capt. Bouldin's Charlotte, Capt. Gipson's Rockbridge, Capt. Cochran's Churchville, Augusta, and Capt. Lackey's Valley cavalry, 150 men in all. Setting out from their camp, near Union, Monroe county, on the morning of the 23d inst., taking a circuitous route, and passing in rear of the enemy, they halted for the night at the foot of Little Sewell mountain. On the next morning they proceeded on and reached the Wilderness road, and a
e Richmond Dispatch.] The following may be relied on as embracing the material facts of the daring brilliant, and successful scout made by Major George Jackson's squadron of cavalry into the county of Nicholas, and forty-five miles in rear of the Yankee camp now at Meadow Bluff, Greenbrier county: The squadron was commanded by Major R. A. Baily, of the 22d Virginia regiment, in the absence of Major Jackson, and consisted of a portion of the companies of Capt. Bouldin's Charlotte, Capt. Gipson's Rockbridge, Capt. Cochran's Churchville, Augusta, and Capt. Lackey's Valley cavalry, 150 men in all. Setting out from their camp, near Union, Monroe county, on the morning of the 23d inst., taking a circuitous route, and passing in rear of the enemy, they halted for the night at the foot of Little Sewell mountain. On the next morning they proceeded on and reached the Wilderness road, and after night rested for a few hours at a point ten miles from Summerville, the county seat of Nichol
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