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McClellan (search for this): article 1
, where they were held in check during the day by the 10th cavalry regiment, under command of Lieut. Col. McGruder. Some ten of our videttes are missing, though it is believed that most of them will return to camp. Two of the enemy's cavalry were killed by the pickets in their retreat. Yesterday our scouts reported that the enemy had fallen back three miles beyond the bridge. Seven prisoners were brought in by the scouts, and one of them, who seems to be an intelligent man, states that McClellan has not more than 55,000 men; that sickness is alarmingly thinning their ranks, and that on Monday afternoon last three divisions, under command of Gens. Harney, Sedgwick, and Hooker with rations for two days, left Harrison's Landing for the purpose of taking Malvern Hill, which they supposed was held by the Confederates with a strong force. This may explain why our entire picket line was kept in expectation of an attack, so that no reinforcements would be sent to Malvern Hill. The Yanke
ieved that most of them will return to camp. Two of the enemy's cavalry were killed by the pickets in their retreat. Yesterday our scouts reported that the enemy had fallen back three miles beyond the bridge. Seven prisoners were brought in by the scouts, and one of them, who seems to be an intelligent man, states that McClellan has not more than 55,000 men; that sickness is alarmingly thinning their ranks, and that on Monday afternoon last three divisions, under command of Gens. Harney, Sedgwick, and Hooker with rations for two days, left Harrison's Landing for the purpose of taking Malvern Hill, which they supposed was held by the Confederates with a strong force. This may explain why our entire picket line was kept in expectation of an attack, so that no reinforcements would be sent to Malvern Hill. The Yankees, however, were somewhat disappointed in their anticipations of a brilliant victory. With reference to the fight at Malvern Hill, on Tuesday, we learn that our notic
st of them will return to camp. Two of the enemy's cavalry were killed by the pickets in their retreat. Yesterday our scouts reported that the enemy had fallen back three miles beyond the bridge. Seven prisoners were brought in by the scouts, and one of them, who seems to be an intelligent man, states that McClellan has not more than 55,000 men; that sickness is alarmingly thinning their ranks, and that on Monday afternoon last three divisions, under command of Gens. Harney, Sedgwick, and Hooker with rations for two days, left Harrison's Landing for the purpose of taking Malvern Hill, which they supposed was held by the Confederates with a strong force. This may explain why our entire picket line was kept in expectation of an attack, so that no reinforcements would be sent to Malvern Hill. The Yankees, however, were somewhat disappointed in their anticipations of a brilliant victory. With reference to the fight at Malvern Hill, on Tuesday, we learn that our notice of yesterda
gh it is believed that most of them will return to camp. Two of the enemy's cavalry were killed by the pickets in their retreat. Yesterday our scouts reported that the enemy had fallen back three miles beyond the bridge. Seven prisoners were brought in by the scouts, and one of them, who seems to be an intelligent man, states that McClellan has not more than 55,000 men; that sickness is alarmingly thinning their ranks, and that on Monday afternoon last three divisions, under command of Gens. Harney, Sedgwick, and Hooker with rations for two days, left Harrison's Landing for the purpose of taking Malvern Hill, which they supposed was held by the Confederates with a strong force. This may explain why our entire picket line was kept in expectation of an attack, so that no reinforcements would be sent to Malvern Hill. The Yankees, however, were somewhat disappointed in their anticipations of a brilliant victory. With reference to the fight at Malvern Hill, on Tuesday, we learn th
Skirmishing below Richmond. On Tuesday last a body of the enemy, about 3,000 strong, consisting of infantry, artillery, and cavalry, drove in our videttes to White Oak Swamp bridge, where they were held in check during the day by the 10th cavalry regiment, under command of Lieut. Col. McGruder. Some ten of our videttes are missing, though it is believed that most of them will return to camp. Two of the enemy's cavalry were killed by the pickets in their retreat. Yesterday our scouts reported that the enemy had fallen back three miles beyond the bridge. Seven prisoners were brought in by the scouts, and one of them, who seems to be an intelligent man, states that McClellan has not more than 55,000 men; that sickness is alarmingly thinning their ranks, and that on Monday afternoon last three divisions, under command of Gens. Harney, Sedgwick, and Hooker with rations for two days, left Harrison's Landing for the purpose of taking Malvern Hill, which they supposed was held by the
Malvern Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
fternoon last three divisions, under command of Gens. Harney, Sedgwick, and Hooker with rations for two days, left Harrison's Landing for the purpose of taking Malvern Hill, which they supposed was held by the Confederates with a strong force. This may explain why our entire picket line was kept in expectation of an attack, so that no reinforcements would be sent to Malvern Hill. The Yankees, however, were somewhat disappointed in their anticipations of a brilliant victory. With reference to the fight at Malvern Hill, on Tuesday, we learn that our notice of yesterday was in the main correct, our forces having been driven from that position. It is nMalvern Hill, on Tuesday, we learn that our notice of yesterday was in the main correct, our forces having been driven from that position. It is not certain that any attempt was yesterday made to regain the hill by our troops. One report states that a force was sent down, and after a brisk fight was repulsed, whilst another represents that the position was recovered without serious opposition. It is more than probable, from information received late last evening that our
McClellan (search for this): article 1
ad taken the oath of allegiance to the Yankee Government, and on one of the sailor's asking him for clothes put him in irons, and so kept him till he was delivered up at Aiken's farm, on Tuesday. Rowan and the other men of the Petrel were carried to Philadelphia, and consigned to Moyamensing prison, where they were kept in irons for six months and twenty days, thence were carried to Fort Lafayette, where, after the departure of most of the able-bodied soldiers of the garrison to reinforce McClellan, they were required to do police duty, and, refusing, were again ironed. For months the threat of impending destruction was kept before their eyes, but when they found out that the Southern Government would retaliate the minions of Yankee tyranny contented themselves with simply making their position as disagreeable as they could. All of the men are unanimous in saying that their treatment has been infamous from the beginning. Among those that came yesterday was the privateersman, Wm. S
William Smith (search for this): article 1
the sailor's asking him for clothes put him in irons, and so kept him till he was delivered up at Aiken's farm, on Tuesday. Rowan and the other men of the Petrel were carried to Philadelphia, and consigned to Moyamensing prison, where they were kept in irons for six months and twenty days, thence were carried to Fort Lafayette, where, after the departure of most of the able-bodied soldiers of the garrison to reinforce McClellan, they were required to do police duty, and, refusing, were again ironed. For months the threat of impending destruction was kept before their eyes, but when they found out that the Southern Government would retaliate the minions of Yankee tyranny contented themselves with simply making their position as disagreeable as they could. All of the men are unanimous in saying that their treatment has been infamous from the beginning. Among those that came yesterday was the privateersman, Wm. Smith, who was condemned by a Philadelphia jury to be hung as a pirate.
re was no abatement in the severity of their treatment. Rowan states that the Baltimore ladies sent the Petrel's crew a large lot of clothing, which was received by Lieut. Harvey, of that vessel, and distributed. He turned over the surplus to Mr. Gibson, commandant of Fort Lafayette, for distribution among the other privateersmen. Gibson distributed it to the chicken headed Confederates who had taken the oath of allegiance to the Yankee Government, and on one of the sailor's asking him for clGibson distributed it to the chicken headed Confederates who had taken the oath of allegiance to the Yankee Government, and on one of the sailor's asking him for clothes put him in irons, and so kept him till he was delivered up at Aiken's farm, on Tuesday. Rowan and the other men of the Petrel were carried to Philadelphia, and consigned to Moyamensing prison, where they were kept in irons for six months and twenty days, thence were carried to Fort Lafayette, where, after the departure of most of the able-bodied soldiers of the garrison to reinforce McClellan, they were required to do police duty, and, refusing, were again ironed. For months the threat o
Beauregard (search for this): article 1
The Confederate privateersmen. --Among the paroled prisoners that arrived here yesterday were 82 men, composing the crews of the ships Dixie, Petrel. Beauregard, Savannah, Sumter, &c. We saw yesterday John Jonnelli and Chas. Forrester, two of the crew of the Dixie, Capt. Moore and Henry A. Rowan, of the Petrel, Capt. Percy. The Dixie was captured on the 3d of August, 1861, off Charleston, S. C., by the U. S. frigate Wabash; the Petrel by the St. Lawrence, after being out of Charleston, S. C., but a few hours, on the 28th of August, 1861.--The crew were closely ironed and sent to Hampton Roads, where they remained three weeks, and were conveyed to New York on the Minnesota, thence to Fort Lafayette, where there was no abatement in the severity of their treatment. Rowan states that the Baltimore ladies sent the Petrel's crew a large lot of clothing, which was received by Lieut. Harvey, of that vessel, and distributed. He turned over the surplus to Mr. Gibson, commandant of Fort
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