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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 9, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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Mississippi (United States) (search for this): article 1
g the Federal gunboats attacked the Confederate ram Arkansas. Messengers inform me that she fought them well for sometime, inflicting great damage. She was then blown up by her crow. The messenger thinks they all escaped. "(Signed) John C. Breckinridge." "Collet's River, ten miles from Baton Rouge, Aug. 6--We occupied the whole of the town and the battle field till evening, but no decisive result was gained after my last dispatch. There being no water between here and the Mississippi river come with her machinery injured five miles above the town all day yesterday. Her commander sent me word last evening that he would try to get her up the river, and asks if it be possible to send him a boat to aid him. From the reports she is permanently unserviceable. We burnt nearly all of their camps, and a large amount of stores, and cut them up badly.--Gen. Williams, and other prominent officers. killed. "(Signed) John C. Breckinridge., Rumor says that Gen. Clarke is
Amite River (Louisiana, United States) (search for this): article 1
Destruction of the "Arkansas,"the capture of Baton RougeGen Breckinridge's dispatches. Mobile, Aug. 8--A special dispatch to the Advertise and Register dated Jackson, to-day, says! Gen. Van-Dorn permits me to copy the following dispatches: "Amite River, Aug. 6.--About one o'clock this morning the Federal gunboats attacked the Confederate ram Arkansas. Messengers inform me that she fought them well for sometime, inflicting great damage. She was then blown up by her crow. The messenger thinks they all escaped. "(Signed) John C. Breckinridge." "Collet's River, ten miles from Baton Rouge, Aug. 6--We occupied the whole of the town and the battle field till evening, but no decisive result was gained after my last dispatch. There being no water between here and the Mississippi river come with her machinery injured five miles above the town all day yesterday. Her commander sent me word last evening that he would try to get her up the river, and asks if it be p
One hundred Dollars reward. --I will pay the above reward for the apprehension and delivery to me in Richmond, of my Negro Boy Lewis, aged 18 years; 5 feet 5 inches high; dark color; polite and well-bred in address. And of my Horse, deep brown color; strong, well-framed, and marked under the throat with scars from a recent attack of distemper. I will pay the above reward for the Boy and the Horse, or fifty dollars for either. John Ambler, Major. Q. M. and Paymaster Army of the Potomac. au 9--6t*
John Ambler (search for this): article 1
One hundred Dollars reward. --I will pay the above reward for the apprehension and delivery to me in Richmond, of my Negro Boy Lewis, aged 18 years; 5 feet 5 inches high; dark color; polite and well-bred in address. And of my Horse, deep brown color; strong, well-framed, and marked under the throat with scars from a recent attack of distemper. I will pay the above reward for the Boy and the Horse, or fifty dollars for either. John Ambler, Major. Q. M. and Paymaster Army of the Potomac. au 9--6t*
he did. This I did for the purpose of getting his style of handling the "key" in writing dispatches. My first impressions of his style, from noticing the paper in the instrument, were, confirmed. He was, to use a telegraphic term, a "plug" operator. I adopted his style of writing, and commenced operations. In this office I found a signal book, which proved to be very useful. It contained the calls for all the offices. Dispatch after dispatch was going to and from Lexington, Georgetown, Paris, and Frankfort, all containing something in reference to Morgan. On commencing operations at this place, I discovered that there were two wires on the line along this railroad. One was what we term a "through wire," running direct from Lexington to Frank fort, and not entering any of the way offices. I found that all military business was sent over that wire. As it did not enter the Midway office, I ordered it to be cut, thus forcing Lexington on to the wire that did run through the
John H. Morgan (search for this): article 10
that comes under my supervision on this route. I expect in a short time to pay you a visit, and wish to know if you will be at home. All well in Dixie. John H. Morgan, Commanding Brigade." "Gen. J. T. Boyle, Louisville: "Good morning, Jerry. This telegraph is a great institution. You should destroy it, as it keeps you too well posted. My friend, Ellsworth, has all of your dispatches since the 10th of July on file. Do you wish copies? John H. Morgan, "Commanding Brigade." "Hon. Geo. W. Dunlop, Washington City: "Just completed my tour through Kentucky--captured seventeen cities, destroyed millions of dollars worth of U. S. property — passed through your county, but regret not seeing you. We paroled fifteen hundred Federal prisoners. "Your old friend, John H. Morgan, "Commanding " The foregoing dispatches were well calculated to dumfound these Yankee dignitaries — who, no doubt, were half inclined to pronounce them some sp
estion after question was asked me about the rebels, and I answered to suit myself. Things had been going on this way about two hours, when Lexington asked me where my assistant was. I replied, "Don't know," He then asked me, "Have you seen him to day?" I replied, "No." This was the last telegraphing I could do in Georgetown. On arriving at Somerset, Ky., another operator was captured, and after some Yankee messages were received the following dispatches were sent; "Somerset, July 22. "George D. Prentice, Louisville. "Good morning, George D. I am quietly watching the complete destruction of all of Uncle Saur's property in this little burg. I regret exceedingly that this is the last that comes under my supervision on this route. I expect in a short time to pay you a visit, and wish to know if you will be at home. All well in Dixie. John H. Morgan, Commanding Brigade." "Gen. J. T. Boyle, Louisville: "Good morning, Jerry. This teleg
ngton was headquarters, I cut Frankfort off. Midway was called. I answered and received the following: "Lexington, July 15. "To J. W. Woolums, Operator Midway: "Will there be any danger in coming to Midway? Is everything right? Tayl man by the name of Taylor. He said Taylor was conductor. I immediately gave Taylor the following reply: "Midway, July 15. "To Taylor, Lexington: "All right — come on — no signs of any rebels here. "Woolums," The operator ir finished, when Lexington called Frankfort. Again I answered and received the following message: "Lexington, July 15, "To Gen. Finnell, Frankfort: "I wish you to move the forces at Frankfort on the line of the Lexington railroadrator." In about ten minutes Lexington again called Frankfort, when I received the following: "Lexington, July 15. "To Gen. Finnell, Frankfort: "Morgan, with more than 1,000 men, came within a mile of here and took the old Fr
e Midway road, moving in the direction of Georgetown. "Brigadier General Ward." This being our position and intention exactly, it was thought proper to throw Gen. Ward on some other track. So, in the course of half an hour, I manufactured and sent the following dispaapproved by Gen. Morgan: "Midway, July 15, 1862. "To Brig. Gen. Ward, Lexington: "Morgan, with upwards of 1,000 men, came withs reliable. The regiment from Frankfort had better be recalled. Gen. Ward," I receipted for this message, and again manufactured a message to confirm the information General Ward had received from Midway, and not knowing The taking of Murfreesboro' by Forrest was three dhim. I telegraphed as follows: "Frankfort to Lexington: Tell Gen. Ward our pickets are just driven in great excitement — pickets say thep us posted. "Lexington." "To Lexington: I will do so, Tell Gen. Ward I'll stay up all night if he wishes. "Georgetown." "To
George D. Prentice (search for this): article 10
asked me about the rebels, and I answered to suit myself. Things had been going on this way about two hours, when Lexington asked me where my assistant was. I replied, "Don't know," He then asked me, "Have you seen him to day?" I replied, "No." This was the last telegraphing I could do in Georgetown. On arriving at Somerset, Ky., another operator was captured, and after some Yankee messages were received the following dispatches were sent; "Somerset, July 22. "George D. Prentice, Louisville. "Good morning, George D. I am quietly watching the complete destruction of all of Uncle Saur's property in this little burg. I regret exceedingly that this is the last that comes under my supervision on this route. I expect in a short time to pay you a visit, and wish to know if you will be at home. All well in Dixie. John H. Morgan, Commanding Brigade." "Gen. J. T. Boyle, Louisville: "Good morning, Jerry. This telegraph is a great instituti
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