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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: August 9, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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John Brown (search for this): article 1
es under General Brecktaridge in the attack on Baton Rouge. When within about fire miles of the latter place, she unluckily grounded, and all efforts to get her off were unavailing. But two alternatives were left — to blow her up, or suffer her to be captured by the Federal gunboats. The former, was resorted to, and this proud achievement of naval architecture show a wreck in the Mississippi river. P. S.--Official dispatches have been received at the Navy Department confirming the disaster. The Arkansas left Vicksburg last Monday, to co-operate in the attack upon Baton Rouge. After passing Bayon Sara her machinery became deranged, or disabled. While engaged in repairing, a fleet of gunboats from below attacked her. Gallant resistance was made, but the vessel had to be abandoned and blown up. The officers and crow reached above in safety. Lieut. Stevens, of South Carolina, commanded the Arkansas, Com. Brown being detained at Vicksburg, not having recovered from his wounds.
es under General Brecktaridge in the attack on Baton Rouge. When within about fire miles of the latter place, she unluckily grounded, and all efforts to get her off were unavailing. But two alternatives were left — to blow her up, or suffer her to be captured by the Federal gunboats. The former, was resorted to, and this proud achievement of naval architecture show a wreck in the Mississippi river. P. S.--Official dispatches have been received at the Navy Department confirming the disaster. The Arkansas left Vicksburg last Monday, to co-operate in the attack upon Baton Rouge. After passing Bayon Sara her machinery became deranged, or disabled. While engaged in repairing, a fleet of gunboats from below attacked her. Gallant resistance was made, but the vessel had to be abandoned and blown up. The officers and crow reached above in safety. Lieut. Stevens, of South Carolina, commanded the Arkansas, Com. Brown being detained at Vicksburg, not having recovered from his wounds.
Brecktaridge (search for this): article 1
Destruction of the Arkansas. No little sensation was yesterday created by the announcement on the streets that the Navy Department had received intelligence of the destruction of the Confederate ram "Arkansas." Without any direct information to confirm the announcement, we are sorry to state that little doubt exists of its correctness. It seems that she left Vicksburg to co-operate with the land forces under General Brecktaridge in the attack on Baton Rouge. When within about fire miles of the latter place, she unluckily grounded, and all efforts to get her off were unavailing. But two alternatives were left — to blow her up, or suffer her to be captured by the Federal gunboats. The former, was resorted to, and this proud achievement of naval architecture show a wreck in the Mississippi river. P. S.--Official dispatches have been received at the Navy Department confirming the disaster. The Arkansas left Vicksburg last Monday, to co-operate in the attack upon Baton Rouge
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 1
es under General Brecktaridge in the attack on Baton Rouge. When within about fire miles of the latter place, she unluckily grounded, and all efforts to get her off were unavailing. But two alternatives were left — to blow her up, or suffer her to be captured by the Federal gunboats. The former, was resorted to, and this proud achievement of naval architecture show a wreck in the Mississippi river. P. S.--Official dispatches have been received at the Navy Department confirming the disaster. The Arkansas left Vicksburg last Monday, to co-operate in the attack upon Baton Rouge. After passing Bayon Sara her machinery became deranged, or disabled. While engaged in repairing, a fleet of gunboats from below attacked her. Gallant resistance was made, but the vessel had to be abandoned and blown up. The officers and crow reached above in safety. Lieut. Stevens, of South Carolina, commanded the Arkansas, Com. Brown being detained at Vicksburg, not having recovered from his wounds.
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 1
Destruction of the Arkansas. No little sensation was yesterday created by the announcement on the streets that the Navy Department had received intelligence of the destruction of the Confederate ram "Arkansas." Without any direct information to confirm the announcement, we are sorry to state that little doubt exists of its correctness. It seems that she left Vicksburg to co-operate with the land forces under General Brecktaridge in the attack on Baton Rouge. When within about fire miles of the latter place, she unluckily grounded, and all efforts to get her off were unavailing. But two alternatives were left — to blow her up, or suffer her to be captured by the Federal gunboats. The former, was resorted to, and this proud achievement of naval architecture show a wreck in the Mississippi river. P. S.--Official dispatches have been received at the Navy Department confirming the disaster. The Arkansas left Vicksburg last Monday, to co-operate in the attack upon Baton Rouge
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): article 1
ittle doubt exists of its correctness. It seems that she left Vicksburg to co-operate with the land forces under General Brecktaridge in the attack on Baton Rouge. When within about fire miles of the latter place, she unluckily grounded, and all efforts to get her off were unavailing. But two alternatives were left — to blow her up, or suffer her to be captured by the Federal gunboats. The former, was resorted to, and this proud achievement of naval architecture show a wreck in the Mississippi river. P. S.--Official dispatches have been received at the Navy Department confirming the disaster. The Arkansas left Vicksburg last Monday, to co-operate in the attack upon Baton Rouge. After passing Bayon Sara her machinery became deranged, or disabled. While engaged in repairing, a fleet of gunboats from below attacked her. Gallant resistance was made, but the vessel had to be abandoned and blown up. The officers and crow reached above in safety. Lieut. Stevens, of South Carolin
fair at Malvern Hill has furnished us with the following particulars with reference to the occupancy of that point by the enemy, and its subsequent recovery by our forces under Gen. Longstreet: On Tuesday morning the 8th Georgia regiment Captain Dawson commanding, was moved up from New Market Heights to relieve the 17th, then on picket at Malvern Hill. On the march they were met by several couriers, stating that the enemy were in large force advancing upon the hill and in its immediate vicinity. The reports of artillery gave evidence that a brisk engagement was going on. When the 8th Georgia reached the base of the hill the announcement was made by several couriers to Capt. Dawson, that the ammunition of our pieces was exhausted, and that the artillery at the and the 17th, were surrounded, Capt. D. immediately dispatched a courier to the commandant of the 17th, that he had formed his regiment in line of battle at the base of the hill, and would protect their retreat and to come
Gen Longstreet (search for this): article 2
affair at Malvern Hill. An officer who participated in the affair at Malvern Hill has furnished us with the following particulars with reference to the occupancy of that point by the enemy, and its subsequent recovery by our forces under Gen. Longstreet: On Tuesday morning the 8th Georgia regiment Captain Dawson commanding, was moved up from New Market Heights to relieve the 17th, then on picket at Malvern Hill. On the march they were met by several couriers, stating that the enemy we, the cavalry and infantry took position at an eligible position about 400 yards in rear of the woods. The enemy made no further demonstration on that day having full possession of the hill. On Wednesday morning at daylight the corps of Gen Longstreet was moved forward, and encamped night within half a mile of the hill, the day having been spent in reconnoitering. On Thursday, about 12 o'clock, the corps advanced and took possession of the hill without firing a gun, the enemy having the
Malvern Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
The affair at Malvern Hill. An officer who participated in the affair at Malvern Hill has furnished us with the following particulars with reference to the occupancy of that point by the enemy, and its subsequent recovery by our forces under Gen. Longstreet: On Tuesday morning the 8th Georgia regiment Captain Dawson comMalvern Hill has furnished us with the following particulars with reference to the occupancy of that point by the enemy, and its subsequent recovery by our forces under Gen. Longstreet: On Tuesday morning the 8th Georgia regiment Captain Dawson commanding, was moved up from New Market Heights to relieve the 17th, then on picket at Malvern Hill. On the march they were met by several couriers, stating that the enemy were in large force advancing upon the hill and in its immediate vicinity. The reports of artillery gave evidence that a brisk engagement was going on. When theMalvern Hill. On the march they were met by several couriers, stating that the enemy were in large force advancing upon the hill and in its immediate vicinity. The reports of artillery gave evidence that a brisk engagement was going on. When the 8th Georgia reached the base of the hill the announcement was made by several couriers to Capt. Dawson, that the ammunition of our pieces was exhausted, and that the artillery at the and the 17th, were surrounded, Capt. D. immediately dispatched a courier to the commandant of the 17th, that he had formed his regiment in line of
William Garrett (search for this): article 3
tes his loss at #2,000. The damage to the railroad track was slight, and has been repaired. The telegraph operator at the station left with his instruments before the enemy arrived. The cavalry, which was the same that burnt the buildings at Beaver Dam, said their next trip would be to Tolersville, about six miles beyond. The party was led by a negro, who ran away from his owner, Mr. S. C. Tally, at Frederick's Hall, and who took a very active part in the destruction of property. Mr. Smith certainly deserves credit for his boldness in making this trip, and for collecting the foregoing valuable information. From another source we learn that the Yankees arrested Mr. Wm. Garrett, a merchant of this city, who was on his way to Louisa county, and sent him to Washington, and stole six negroes from Alexander Garrett, his brother. Direct communication with Gordonsville having been temporarily cut off, we have no late intelligence respecting military movements near that point.
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