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United States (United States) (search for this): article 5
sively within her own mode and manner of legislation. The petitioner having accepted the citizenship conferred, became, on the entrance of Georgia into the Confederate States, a citizen of the Confederate States, with all the obligations of citizenship legally and morally resting upon him. In strictness of language he was not an Confederate States, with all the obligations of citizenship legally and morally resting upon him. In strictness of language he was not an alien, but a citizen "ex donatione regis." He had accepted the benefits of the law, its immunities and privileges, and he, and all in his condition, must, in the opinion of the Court, stand up to the responsibilities it entails. That military service is the duty of the citizen of Georgia, is too plain for argument. The thousandsof citizenship, why did they not say so?--In the opinion of the Court, men of foreign birth in Georgia at the time of secession, owe their allegiance to the Confederate States by reason of their citizenship in Georgia and the act of the State, and should have no exemption from the duties devolved upon other citizens. It was, to s
Georgia (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 5
by uniform rules of naturalization; but when Georgia became a free and independent sovereignty, ann. Relying on the fidelity of her citizens. Georgia was desirous of ascertaining all who disregar ordinance the petitioner became a citizen of Georgia; he was within the scope and jurisdiction of t. As a sovereign power, the Judge held that Georgia had the right to pass the law, for questions zenship conferred, became, on the entrance of Georgia into the Confederate States, a citizen of thef they owed allegiance to foreign powers when Georgia passed her act of citizenship, why did they nopinion of the Court, men of foreign birth in Georgia at the time of secession, owe their allegiancrate States by reason of their citizenship in Georgia and the act of the State, and should have no m from military duty, when, under the laws of Georgia, no difference is known between her citizens,d of duty. In the hour of sunshine and peace Georgia was the home of their adoption and choice, an[2 more...]
gis." He had accepted the benefits of the law, its immunities and privileges, and he, and all in his condition, must, in the opinion of the Court, stand up to the responsibilities it entails. That military service is the duty of the citizen of Georgia, is too plain for argument. The thousands who to-day endure the hardships of the camps and the perils of the field attest it. The petitioner being a citizen by act of the Convention and his own acceptance, then he is liable to military duty. Allens have always claimed the right of expatriation and spurned foreign fealty, ignored monarchs and kingdoms, and proudly accepted the American doctrine or the right of carrying their allegiance with their persons wherever they might go. But the "change coming over" them comes too late. If they owed allegiance to foreign powers when Georgia passed her act of citizenship, why did they not say so?--In the opinion of the Court, men of foreign birth in Georgia at the time of secession, owe their all
Important decision — foreign residents liable to military duty. An important decision affecting foreign residents has been made by Judge Lochrane, of the Macon, Ga., Supreme Court. The question arose on a writ of habeas corpus, brought by an alien to procure his discharge from the Confederate service: In delivering the opinion of the Court, Judge Lochrane denounced unsparingly the pretext of foreign allegiance as an exemption from military service. He said, after a review of the doJudge Lochrane denounced unsparingly the pretext of foreign allegiance as an exemption from military service. He said, after a review of the doctrines of allegiance held in various countries, that they illustrated nothing that would control Courts here, and that every Government had the power of prescribing and perfecting its own system of granting citizenship; no rule of international law was laid down or adopted. In view of this fact it was proper to ascertain the law of Georgia on the subject. At the time of the secession of the State the law of citizenship was controlled under the U. S. Constitution by uniform rules of natura