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Tazewell, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 11
Queer Scenes under a Flag of Truce. The exchange of prisoners taken in the battle in Tazewell took place in that county on the 15th instant. Most of the officers present, both Confederate and Federal, were Tennesseeans. A letter from a participant in the ceremonies, to the Knoxville Register, says: On my arrival at Jones's, some three miles beyond Tazewell, I met with Cols. Bird and Shelly, from Roane county, and several other officers from Kentucky and Ohio, in company with some oTazewell, I met with Cols. Bird and Shelly, from Roane county, and several other officers from Kentucky and Ohio, in company with some of our officers who had gone out before me, all quite jovial and friendly, taking friendly drinks together, &c.--I found our friends Bird and Shelly in fine health, well dressed, fine uniforms, &c. I had a long conversation with them. I think Col. Bird is rather on the anxious seat, and tired of Lincolndom and the laws passed by Abraham's Congress. Col. S. appeared better satisfied, and said the North had done nothing that was not right. I disputed the remark; but we had not met to talk politi
Bradley (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 11
ry Plains Bridge, holds an office in one of the regiments. I could hear of but few from my county. Bogard and Jones, from Philadelphia; Rosers, from Fork Creek; John B. Libton's son, from near Morganton; and a few others, were all I could hear of from my county. David Cleveland, from near my town, has not joined the army, but is trading in stock; his brother, the Major, from Hamilton, has resigned and gone back into Kentucky, as well as many other East Tennessee officers. Cliagan, of Bradley county is Captain of a company; Sneed, of Monroe county, is a Captain also. Colonel Bird says that his opinion is that the North cannot crush the rebellion in less than eighteen months. They also say that they will have six hundred thousand men in the field soon. The Rev. Mr. Carter, chaplain to Col. Carter's 2d Tennessee regiment, was present, and appeared to be enthusiastic. He met with his cousin, Col. Hal. Gillespie, of Colonel Ashby's regiment. He wanted to convince the Colonel th
Hamilton County, Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 11
nd tired of Lincolndom and the laws passed by Abraham's Congress. Col. S. appeared better satisfied, and said the North had done nothing that was not right. I disputed the remark; but we had not met to talk politics, so we said no more. I inquired after our friends from Tennessee generally, and found that they were well. Jim Brownlow is Lieutenant Colonel of Bob Johnson's regiment. Strange for Brownlow's son and Andrew Johnson's to lie down together. I learned that Dan Trewitt, of Hamilton county, and Lieut. Bogard, of Philadelphia, Monroe county, were aids of Brig. Gen. Spear. Clift, from Hamilton, was organizing the 7th regiment. R. M. Edwards was over there, getting up a mounted regiment, to get after McLean's regiment. Young Pickens, who got his hand nearly cut off at Strawberry Plains Bridge, holds an office in one of the regiments. I could hear of but few from my county. Bogard and Jones, from Philadelphia; Rosers, from Fork Creek; John B. Libton's son, from near Morga
Morganton (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 11
n county, and Lieut. Bogard, of Philadelphia, Monroe county, were aids of Brig. Gen. Spear. Clift, from Hamilton, was organizing the 7th regiment. R. M. Edwards was over there, getting up a mounted regiment, to get after McLean's regiment. Young Pickens, who got his hand nearly cut off at Strawberry Plains Bridge, holds an office in one of the regiments. I could hear of but few from my county. Bogard and Jones, from Philadelphia; Rosers, from Fork Creek; John B. Libton's son, from near Morganton; and a few others, were all I could hear of from my county. David Cleveland, from near my town, has not joined the army, but is trading in stock; his brother, the Major, from Hamilton, has resigned and gone back into Kentucky, as well as many other East Tennessee officers. Cliagan, of Bradley county is Captain of a company; Sneed, of Monroe county, is a Captain also. Colonel Bird says that his opinion is that the North cannot crush the rebellion in less than eighteen months. They also s
Roane (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 11
Queer Scenes under a Flag of Truce. The exchange of prisoners taken in the battle in Tazewell took place in that county on the 15th instant. Most of the officers present, both Confederate and Federal, were Tennesseeans. A letter from a participant in the ceremonies, to the Knoxville Register, says: On my arrival at Jones's, some three miles beyond Tazewell, I met with Cols. Bird and Shelly, from Roane county, and several other officers from Kentucky and Ohio, in company with some of our officers who had gone out before me, all quite jovial and friendly, taking friendly drinks together, &c.--I found our friends Bird and Shelly in fine health, well dressed, fine uniforms, &c. I had a long conversation with them. I think Col. Bird is rather on the anxious seat, and tired of Lincolndom and the laws passed by Abraham's Congress. Col. S. appeared better satisfied, and said the North had done nothing that was not right. I disputed the remark; but we had not met to talk politi
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 11
e laws passed by Abraham's Congress. Col. S. appeared better satisfied, and said the North had done nothing that was not right. I disputed the remark; but we had not met to talk politics, so we said no more. I inquired after our friends from Tennessee generally, and found that they were well. Jim Brownlow is Lieutenant Colonel of Bob Johnson's regiment. Strange for Brownlow's son and Andrew Johnson's to lie down together. I learned that Dan Trewitt, of Hamilton county, and Lieut. Bogard, few others, were all I could hear of from my county. David Cleveland, from near my town, has not joined the army, but is trading in stock; his brother, the Major, from Hamilton, has resigned and gone back into Kentucky, as well as many other East Tennessee officers. Cliagan, of Bradley county is Captain of a company; Sneed, of Monroe county, is a Captain also. Colonel Bird says that his opinion is that the North cannot crush the rebellion in less than eighteen months. They also say that they
sfied, and said the North had done nothing that was not right. I disputed the remark; but we had not met to talk politics, so we said no more. I inquired after our friends from Tennessee generally, and found that they were well. Jim Brownlow is Lieutenant Colonel of Bob Johnson's regiment. Strange for Brownlow's son and Andrew Johnson's to lie down together. I learned that Dan Trewitt, of Hamilton county, and Lieut. Bogard, of Philadelphia, Monroe county, were aids of Brig. Gen. Spear. Clift, from Hamilton, was organizing the 7th regiment. R. M. Edwards was over there, getting up a mounted regiment, to get after McLean's regiment. Young Pickens, who got his hand nearly cut off at Strawberry Plains Bridge, holds an office in one of the regiments. I could hear of but few from my county. Bogard and Jones, from Philadelphia; Rosers, from Fork Creek; John B. Libton's son, from near Morganton; and a few others, were all I could hear of from my county. David Cleveland, from near my
ed better satisfied, and said the North had done nothing that was not right. I disputed the remark; but we had not met to talk politics, so we said no more. I inquired after our friends from Tennessee generally, and found that they were well. Jim Brownlow is Lieutenant Colonel of Bob Johnson's regiment. Strange for Brownlow's son and Andrew Johnson's to lie down together. I learned that Dan Trewitt, of Hamilton county, and Lieut. Bogard, of Philadelphia, Monroe county, were aids of Brig. Gen. Spear. Clift, from Hamilton, was organizing the 7th regiment. R. M. Edwards was over there, getting up a mounted regiment, to get after McLean's regiment. Young Pickens, who got his hand nearly cut off at Strawberry Plains Bridge, holds an office in one of the regiments. I could hear of but few from my county. Bogard and Jones, from Philadelphia; Rosers, from Fork Creek; John B. Libton's son, from near Morganton; and a few others, were all I could hear of from my county. David Cleveland,
Ashby's regiment. He wanted to convince the Colonel that he was wrong. &c., but the Colonel declined. Mr. Carter seemed to think that his quarters would be at the Gap all fall, and wanted his mother to visit him there. I guess he will wake up there soon and think otherwise. They all appeared to think that the Gap could not be taken. My opinion is that to take it by storm will cost us half of our attacking force, if they defend.--From my conversation with different officers, I think the most of their forces have gone beyond the Gap; but in a few days I hope to be able to give you a correct statement of their whereabouts. I think there will be a shaking of dry bones about the Gap. Col. Shelly exchanged spurs with Col. Tom Taylor. Col. Bird also exchanged with me, and we got much the best of the swap. I think, with Col. Rird's spurs on, I will be able to overtake him on his retreat; but we all agreed to shoot high if we got in pistol shot of each other on the battle-field.
many other East Tennessee officers. Cliagan, of Bradley county is Captain of a company; Sneed, of Monroe county, is a Captain also. Colonel Bird says that his opinion is that the North cannot crush the rebellion in less than eighteen months. They also say that they will have six hundred thousand men in the field soon. The Rev. Mr. Carter, chaplain to Col. Carter's 2d Tennessee regiment, was present, and appeared to be enthusiastic. He met with his cousin, Col. Hal. Gillespie, of Colonel Ashby's regiment. He wanted to convince the Colonel that he was wrong. &c., but the Colonel declined. Mr. Carter seemed to think that his quarters would be at the Gap all fall, and wanted his mother to visit him there. I guess he will wake up there soon and think otherwise. They all appeared to think that the Gap could not be taken. My opinion is that to take it by storm will cost us half of our attacking force, if they defend.--From my conversation with different officers, I think the mo
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