hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 10 0 Browse Search
John B. Floyd 9 1 Browse Search
Belle Isle, Va. (Virginia, United States) 8 0 Browse Search
Russell 7 5 Browse Search
France (France) 6 0 Browse Search
R. S. Davis 6 0 Browse Search
Pope 6 2 Browse Search
House 6 0 Browse Search
Rienzi (Mississippi, United States) 6 0 Browse Search
Cary 5 1 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 1, 1862., [Electronic resource].

Found 372 total hits in 210 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
ner was shot in an open space within sight of the fleet. No damage was done to the battery.--Some of the shells fell and exploded some distance beyond the Moultrie House. Fort Beauregard replied slowly. Upon acquiring the range of the enemy's vessels with our rifle gun, one shot caused them to leave in a very hasty manner for their old anchorage.--Charleston Courier, Aug. 28th. Tired of fighting for the Tyrant. Mr. J. D. Howe, of the 1st Missouri regiment, informs us that on the 2d instant two regiments, one from Kentucky and the other from Indiana, rebelled at Rienzi, Miss, and started South with their arms. Four regiments of Wisconsin troops were sent to intercept them, when a fight ensued, lasting from Saturday morning until night. The Kentuckians and Indianians drove the Wisconsian regiments six miles in the direction of Corinth. At sundown the Federals were reinforced by two Illinois regiments, who came up in the rear of the rebels and compelled them to surrender. T
lamation. --Under a special act of the Legislature, on the 27th of June last I issued a proclamation calling for a State force of ten thousand men, to be commanded by Major-General John B. Floyd, to be employed chiefly in the defence of Western Virginia. In consequence of the large force which had previously volunteered for service, and of the additional number called for by the Conscription Act, the amount asked for was not raised with the rapidity desired. I, therefore, on the 4th inst., issued orders calling for the militia between the ages of 35 and 45 years, from the counties of Washington, Smythe, Grayson. Carroll, Floyd, Pulaski, Wythe, Montgomery, Roanoke, Botetourt, Craig, Alleghany, Greenbrier, Monroe, Gilus, Mercer, Bland, Tazewell McDowell, Wise, Buchanan, Lee, Scott, Russell, Raleigh, Wyoming, Logan, Boone, Wayne, Cabell, Putnam, Kanawha, Mason, Clay, Nicholas, Fayette, Braxton, Webster, Pocahontas, and Randolph. Surely it is not necessary to appeal to th
that he confesses to a heavy loss in the brigade which he commanded: Hdq'rs 3d Brigade, in the Field, Camp at Cedar Mountain, Va., Aug. 11, '62. Brigadier-General A. S. Williams, commanding 1st division 2d army corps, Army of Virginia: Sir. --I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken by my brigade in the recent battle of Saturday, August 9th, at Cedar Mountain, three miles from Culpeper Court-House, with the enemy under Gen. Jackson. At 9 A. M. on the 9th, after a hurried march of the day before, which was prolonged until 12 o'clock at night, I received orders to remove my brigade from the town of Culpeper, where we were in bivouac, rapidly to the front, as Gen. Crawford (commanding 1st brigade, 1st division) had been attacked and needed assistance. My brigade was put in motion at once, and reached the position of Gen. Crawford at about 12 M. I was directed by Gen. Roberts, of Gen. Pope's staff, to take position on the extreme right, which I
Runaway. --Boy Henry, belonging to me, left my house on Sunday, the 17th ult. He is a thick set boy, of ashy negro color, bushy head of hair, and stammers when spoken to. He is about 22 years old, walks briskly, and has detective teeth in front; wears a dark military cap, braided with gold lace. He is a dining-room servant. I will give one hundred dollars for his delivery to me, if taken within or without the corporation. I entertain the opinion that he has been carried off by some one of our army, by exhibiting a forged pass or free papers. He has gone as a body servant to some one. John Maren, Corner of Grace and 6th sts. se 1--6t
A Confederate Soldier shot. On the 18th ult.,--Kerfoot, a son of Wm. C. Kerfoot, of Clarke county, was shot by a party of Yankees near his father's residence. It seems that he had been about home since Gen. Jackson drove Banks out of the Valley, and that on the approach of the party of Yankees alluded to be attempted to escape, and took refuge in a corn-field, where he was shot. He died on the 22d. Several other Confederate soldiers of the same county were taken prisoners. We trust this will be a warning to our soldiers who remain in the enemy's line with the pretext that they cannot escape.
A Confederate Soldier shot. On the 18th ult.,--Kerfoot, a son of Wm. C. Kerfoot, of Clarke county, was shot by a party of Yankees near his father's residence. It seems that he had been about home since Gen. Jackson drove Banks out of the Valley, and that on the approach of the party of Yankees alluded to be attempted to escape, and took refuge in a corn-field, where he was shot. He died on the 22d. Several other Confederate soldiers of the same county were taken prisoners. We trust this will be a warning to our soldiers who remain in the enemy's line with the pretext that they cannot escape.
came within ten miles of the city yesterday, and destroyed large quantities of cotton and the bridges over Wolf and Hatchie rivers. Five new companies were recently raised in West Tennessee. It is much feared that a band of guerrillas are depredating in the vicinity of Mound City, in Adair county, Mo. "Col. McCullough, of Porter's guerrillas, was sentenced to death as a traitor and shot. Also, fifteen guerrillas, accused of breaking their parole." Gov. Gamble, in a speech at St. Louis, declared that guerrillas are robbers and murderers, and he would treat them as such. The Yankee account of Morgan's fight says that 800 were attacked by 1,700, under Morgan, and defeated with a loss of 300, including Johnson.--The remaining 500 escaped. No telegraphic communication is had South of Russellville, Ky. One hundred and forty Mississippians left Camp Merton, Indiana, on the 23d, for Vicksburg. Eight hundred Kentuckians and Tennesseeans have also been released.
By the Governor of Virginia — a proclamation. --Under a special act of the Legislature, on the 27th of June last I issued a proclamation calling for a State force of ten thousand men, to be commanded by Major-General John B. Floyd, to be employed chiefly in the defence of Western Virginia. In consequence of the large force which had previously volunteered for service, and of the additional number called for by the Conscription Act, the amount asked for was not raised with the rapidity desired. I, therefore, on the 4th inst., issued orders calling for the militia between the ages of 35 and 45 years, from the counties of Washington, Smythe, Grayson. Carroll, Floyd, Pulaski, Wythe, Montgomery, Roanoke, Botetourt, Craig, Alleghany, Greenbrier, Monroe, Gilus, Mercer, Bland, Tazewell McDowell, Wise, Buchanan, Lee, Scott, Russell, Raleigh, Wyoming, Logan, Boone, Wayne, Cabell, Putnam, Kanawha, Mason, Clay, Nicholas, Fayette, Braxton, Webster, Pocahontas, and Randolph. Surel
August 22nd (search for this): article 1
en. Buckner, with 25,000 men, is encamped near Somerset, Ky., and that Gen. Bragg is at Chattanooga with 30,000 more. Gen. Marshall is reported to be at the head of Big Sandy river with 15,000 men. The railroad is in full possession of the rebels. No trains can pass to Nashville. The draft will be enforced on the 1st of September. Foreigners who have voted on their first paper, claiming exemption from draft, are arrested and pressed into service. A dispatch from Memphis, dated August 22d. say: "A guerilla band, numbering 500, came within ten miles of the city yesterday, and destroyed large quantities of cotton and the bridges over Wolf and Hatchie rivers. Five new companies were recently raised in West Tennessee. It is much feared that a band of guerrillas are depredating in the vicinity of Mound City, in Adair county, Mo. "Col. McCullough, of Porter's guerrillas, was sentenced to death as a traitor and shot. Also, fifteen guerrillas, accused of breaking thei
August 27th (search for this): article 9
. Cole, Superintendent of the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad who will proceed at once to the work assigned them. We understand that Col. Cole, under the direction and by the aid of the military authorities will have the road repaired as rapidly as the work can be done, and from his well known energy and the resources at his command, we feel sure that he will "carry up his corner" equally with others who have undertaken to open up the road to our State capital.--Chattanooga Advertiser, Aug, 27th. From Norfolk. A private letter recently received in Petersburg from a lady in Norfolk has been published. We copy the following interesting extracts: Poor, unfortunate Norfolk! Would that the torch had been applied to every dwelling here, and the city laid waste. Better, far better, to have been a scene of desolation than the stage on which such humiliating scenes are daily enacted. I sincerely hope, if the rulers find it necessary to evacuate any more cities, they will
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...