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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: September 1, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Saltville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 7
The militia. --We are at present having somewhat of a muss among the militia. The Governor's proclamation calling them out is not considered "according to Gunter." in the first place, a specified number in each county were called, and then the whole. In the first call, the Presiding Justices of the counties were virtually made Brigadiers, who were to turn the militia over to "intelligent gentlemen," who in turn were to turn them over to Gen. Floyd, at Saltville. In the second call, they were to go under their own officers and report to Gen. Floyd at Wytheville. Then the thing became tangled, and several field officers, considering themselves ignored, refused to respond, among them Col. J. H. Ernest, of this county. He conceived that the Governor, by his proclamation, disorganized the militia, which he had no power under the Constitution to do, and it was therefore illegal. He addressed the people here on Monday last upon the subject, and took a bold stand against the illeg
J. H. Ernest (search for this): article 7
, at Saltville. In the second call, they were to go under their own officers and report to Gen. Floyd at Wytheville. Then the thing became tangled, and several field officers, considering themselves ignored, refused to respond, among them Col. J. H. Ernest, of this county. He conceived that the Governor, by his proclamation, disorganized the militia, which he had no power under the Constitution to do, and it was therefore illegal. He addressed the people here on Monday last upon the subject and it was therefore illegal. He addressed the people here on Monday last upon the subject, and took a bold stand against the illegality of the requirements of the proclamation. For his refusal to comply he had been cited to appear before a court martial at Wytheville on Tuesday last. He attended, and on a proper understanding of the matter — which, it appeared, had been somewhat mystified by recruiting officers — the charges were withdrawn and Col. Ernest discharged.--Abingdon Virginia
The militia. --We are at present having somewhat of a muss among the militia. The Governor's proclamation calling them out is not considered "according to Gunter." in the first place, a specified number in each county were called, and then the whole. In the first call, the Presiding Justices of the counties were virtually made Brigadiers, who were to turn the militia over to "intelligent gentlemen," who in turn were to turn them over to Gen. Floyd, at Saltville. In the second call, they were to go under their own officers and report to Gen. Floyd at Wytheville. Then the thing became tangled, and several field officers, considering themselves ignored, refused to respond, among them Col. J. H. Ernest, of this county. He conceived that the Governor, by his proclamation, disorganized the militia, which he had no power under the Constitution to do, and it was therefore illegal. He addressed the people here on Monday last upon the subject, and took a bold stand against the illega
John B. Floyd (search for this): article 7
umber in each county were called, and then the whole. In the first call, the Presiding Justices of the counties were virtually made Brigadiers, who were to turn the militia over to "intelligent gentlemen," who in turn were to turn them over to Gen. Floyd, at Saltville. In the second call, they were to go under their own officers and report to Gen. Floyd at Wytheville. Then the thing became tangled, and several field officers, considering themselves ignored, refused to respond, among them Col.Gen. Floyd at Wytheville. Then the thing became tangled, and several field officers, considering themselves ignored, refused to respond, among them Col. J. H. Ernest, of this county. He conceived that the Governor, by his proclamation, disorganized the militia, which he had no power under the Constitution to do, and it was therefore illegal. He addressed the people here on Monday last upon the subject, and took a bold stand against the illegality of the requirements of the proclamation. For his refusal to comply he had been cited to appear before a court martial at Wytheville on Tuesday last. He attended, and on a proper understanding of th