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Wisconsin (Wisconsin, United States) (search for this): article 9
the Moultrie House. Fort Beauregard replied slowly. Upon acquiring the range of the enemy's vessels with our rifle gun, one shot caused them to leave in a very hasty manner for their old anchorage.--Charleston Courier, Aug. 28th. Tired of fighting for the Tyrant. Mr. J. D. Howe, of the 1st Missouri regiment, informs us that on the 2d instant two regiments, one from Kentucky and the other from Indiana, rebelled at Rienzi, Miss, and started South with their arms. Four regiments of Wisconsin troops were sent to intercept them, when a fight ensued, lasting from Saturday morning until night. The Kentuckians and Indianians drove the Wisconsian regiments six miles in the direction of Corinth. At sundown the Federals were reinforced by two Illinois regiments, who came up in the rear of the rebels and compelled them to surrender. They were arrested and sent to Chicago. An eye witness who walked over the field says he counted 353 killed; and another, who spent more time, says
Indiana (Indiana, United States) (search for this): article 9
amage was done to the battery.--Some of the shells fell and exploded some distance beyond the Moultrie House. Fort Beauregard replied slowly. Upon acquiring the range of the enemy's vessels with our rifle gun, one shot caused them to leave in a very hasty manner for their old anchorage.--Charleston Courier, Aug. 28th. Tired of fighting for the Tyrant. Mr. J. D. Howe, of the 1st Missouri regiment, informs us that on the 2d instant two regiments, one from Kentucky and the other from Indiana, rebelled at Rienzi, Miss, and started South with their arms. Four regiments of Wisconsin troops were sent to intercept them, when a fight ensued, lasting from Saturday morning until night. The Kentuckians and Indianians drove the Wisconsian regiments six miles in the direction of Corinth. At sundown the Federals were reinforced by two Illinois regiments, who came up in the rear of the rebels and compelled them to surrender. They were arrested and sent to Chicago. An eye witness wh
De Soto (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 9
ying off near the Louisiana shore, and it is also supposed that they have a land battery of two guns on shore near Mr. Burney's place. They kept up a vigorous bombardment for three hours, and averaged about one shell a minute. At first their aim was directed at our batteries, but afterwards they commenced throwing, their shells indiscriminately in every direction, nearly all falling short. Some came within a short distance of the city; some fell in the river, and some were seen to fall in DeSoto. Our batteries escaped injury, and nobody was hurt. Some old houses below the city were struck, but no serious damage done. The principal damage was the digging up of a patch of potatoes by the shells. A shell struck the residence of Mr. Victor F. Wilson, entering the northwest corner, and from thence to the cellar, where it exploded, tearing things to pieces generally, and coming out at the top of the building. We are informed that one of our citizens, a noncombatant, was wound
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 9
Vicle to vacate it, as he wishes it for his headquarters. They say this is only the beginning of what they intend to do. Curtis's free papers. The following is a copy of an emancipation paper and pass issued by the Federal commander in Arkansas: Headq'rs of the Southwest,Helena, Ark., July 21, 1862. Special Order, No. 157. Jerry White, a colored man, formerly a slave, having by direction of his owner been engaged in rebel service, is hereby confiscated as being contraband t, all sorts of stock are taken, and disposed of by them at astonishingly low prices. The overseers on the plantations have gone off, and the negroes are masters of the situation. This is the Northern coloring of affairs in that portion of Arkansas under control of the Federal army, and although it is doubtless colored as favorably as possible, it exhibits a condition gloomy enough. From this our people may learn the character of the war they will see, if, by their own supineness, they su
Illinois (Illinois, United States) (search for this): article 9
he Tyrant. Mr. J. D. Howe, of the 1st Missouri regiment, informs us that on the 2d instant two regiments, one from Kentucky and the other from Indiana, rebelled at Rienzi, Miss, and started South with their arms. Four regiments of Wisconsin troops were sent to intercept them, when a fight ensued, lasting from Saturday morning until night. The Kentuckians and Indianians drove the Wisconsian regiments six miles in the direction of Corinth. At sundown the Federals were reinforced by two Illinois regiments, who came up in the rear of the rebels and compelled them to surrender. They were arrested and sent to Chicago. An eye witness who walked over the field says he counted 353 killed; and another, who spent more time, says he counted over 600 dead.--Jackson Mississippian, 25th. The reaction in New York. A gentleman who has arrived at his home in the South, after a sojourn of about six weeks in New York — having been taken with a captured vessel in attempting to run the
Rienzi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 9
e battery.--Some of the shells fell and exploded some distance beyond the Moultrie House. Fort Beauregard replied slowly. Upon acquiring the range of the enemy's vessels with our rifle gun, one shot caused them to leave in a very hasty manner for their old anchorage.--Charleston Courier, Aug. 28th. Tired of fighting for the Tyrant. Mr. J. D. Howe, of the 1st Missouri regiment, informs us that on the 2d instant two regiments, one from Kentucky and the other from Indiana, rebelled at Rienzi, Miss, and started South with their arms. Four regiments of Wisconsin troops were sent to intercept them, when a fight ensued, lasting from Saturday morning until night. The Kentuckians and Indianians drove the Wisconsian regiments six miles in the direction of Corinth. At sundown the Federals were reinforced by two Illinois regiments, who came up in the rear of the rebels and compelled them to surrender. They were arrested and sent to Chicago. An eye witness who walked over the fie
Yazoo River (United States) (search for this): article 9
From the South. Our Southern exchanges furnish the following interesting intelligence: From Vicksburg — the shelling again commenced. The following items are from the Vicksburg Evening Citizen, of Friday: Yesterday morning the Federal ram, Monarch, and the gunboat Luther No. 3, went up the Yazoo river. At 3 o'clock in the evening one or two others were seen going up. Our preparations in that quarter are ample to meet and repel the enemy. Yesterday afternoon, about 4 o'clock, the enemy's mortar boats below here opened fire upon our batteries. They were laying off near the Louisiana shore, and it is also supposed that they have a land battery of two guns on shore near Mr. Burney's place. They kept up a vigorous bombardment for three hours, and averaged about one shell a minute. At first their aim was directed at our batteries, but afterwards they commenced throwing, their shells indiscriminately in every direction, nearly all falling short. Some came withi
Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 9
ar papers, have been shipped to the North, yet, according to their own reports, some five thousand runaways yet remain within the Federal lines at Helena. Most of the officers, and many of the privates, have supplied themselves with servants of both sexes. Of the condition of affairs in the vicinity of Helena a gentleman recently from that point gives the Memphis (Federal) Bulletin a gloomy account. It is stated that the negroes, manufacture all sorts of lies about having worked at Fort Pillow, and thus obtain passes to go North. These remain upon their master's farms as long as they can get anything to eat, and instead of working they set themselves to stealing horses, mules, and cows; in fact, all sorts of stock are taken, and disposed of by them at astonishingly low prices. The overseers on the plantations have gone off, and the negroes are masters of the situation. This is the Northern coloring of affairs in that portion of Arkansas under control of the Federal army,
Helena, Ark. (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 9
y are taking possession of all the rebel property as they need it. The gentleman who has been occupying Dr. Wm. Selden's elegant mansion, to take care of it in Dr. S.'s absence, has been ordered by Gen. Vicle to vacate it, as he wishes it for his headquarters. They say this is only the beginning of what they intend to do. Curtis's free papers. The following is a copy of an emancipation paper and pass issued by the Federal commander in Arkansas: Headq'rs of the Southwest,Helena, Ark., July 21, 1862. Special Order, No. 157. Jerry White, a colored man, formerly a slave, having by direction of his owner been engaged in rebel service, is hereby confiscated as being contraband of war, and not being needed in the public service, is permitted to pass the pickets of the command northward, and is forever emancipated from his master, who permitted him to assist in attempting to break up the Government and laws of the country. By command of Major-General Curtis. Jer
Sullivan's Island (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 9
lantations have gone off, and the negroes are masters of the situation. This is the Northern coloring of affairs in that portion of Arkansas under control of the Federal army, and although it is doubtless colored as favorably as possible, it exhibits a condition gloomy enough. From this our people may learn the character of the war they will see, if, by their own supineness, they suffer it to be brought home to their own doors. Attack on Fort Beauregard. An officer from Sullivan's Island reports that one or more of the blockading fleet commenced shelling Fort Beauregard, Thursday evening, in retaliation, as is supposed, for the execution of Burger, which they could scarcely have failed to witness, as the prisoner was shot in an open space within sight of the fleet. No damage was done to the battery.--Some of the shells fell and exploded some distance beyond the Moultrie House. Fort Beauregard replied slowly. Upon acquiring the range of the enemy's vessels with our ri
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