hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity (current method)
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 36 0 Browse Search
John Morgan 32 0 Browse Search
Longstreet 16 2 Browse Search
Jackson 11 3 Browse Search
Gallatin, Tenn. (Tennessee, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
Warrenton (Virginia, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
McClellan 9 1 Browse Search
Richmond (Virginia, United States) 8 0 Browse Search
Cumberland Gap (Tennessee, United States) 8 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: September 2, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 54 total hits in 25 results.

1 2 3
August 20th (search for this): article 10
From our army on the Rappahannock — interesting diary — Executions on the route. As late news about the movements of our army is very properly "contraband," even if the press were able to get hold of it, we give some interesting extracts from the diary of "Personnel," published in the Charleston Courier: August 20.--Army crossed the Rapidan, the water thigh deep. Scene exciting and amusing. Nearly whole day thus occupied. August 21.--The enemy in close proximity, and we have to move cautiously. Longstreet's corps is in the front. From a hill on the other side of the Rapidan we have a magnificent view for miles.--Three columns — long, black winding lines of men, their muskets gleaming in the sunshine like silver spears, are in sight, moving in the direction of Fredericksburg, or down the opposite bank of the river. More skirmishing in front. Good many straggles by the wayside, but they are generally broken down soldiers, and trudge slowly along in the tracks of the<
August 21st (search for this): article 10
From our army on the Rappahannock — interesting diary — Executions on the route. As late news about the movements of our army is very properly "contraband," even if the press were able to get hold of it, we give some interesting extracts from the diary of "Personnel," published in the Charleston Courier: August 20.--Army crossed the Rapidan, the water thigh deep. Scene exciting and amusing. Nearly whole day thus occupied. August 21.--The enemy in close proximity, and we have to move cautiously. Longstreet's corps is in the front. From a hill on the other side of the Rapidan we have a magnificent view for miles.--Three columns — long, black winding lines of men, their muskets gleaming in the sunshine like silver spears, are in sight, moving in the direction of Fredericksburg, or down the opposite bank of the river. More skirmishing in front. Good many straggles by the wayside, but they are generally broken down soldiers, and trudge slowly along in the tracks of the<
August 22nd (search for this): article 10
te as frequently do without either from morning until night. We sleep on the ground without any other covering than a blanket, and consider ourselves fortunate if we are not frozen stiff before morning. The nights are both damp and cold. August 22.--To-day, another busy scene. The army resumed its march at daylight, Longstreet's twelve brigades moving toward the Potomac on the right, and Jackson on the left. The latter has passed the Rapidan Station on the Virginia Central Railroad, andshed, but to the last denied al participation in the act of shooting Longstreet's courier. He said that he had an uncle and aunt living in Clarke county, Virginia, and that the latter had made him the Confederate uniform which he wore. August 22,Friday--At Stevensburg — once a fine old sober Virginia village, but now deserted, dilapidated, and as rough as if it had been evolved up from a lot of second-hand rubbish. The ancient burg has evidently been awakened from a long coma, and while I
August 23rd (search for this): article 10
y swear that they are Gen. Burnside's men. I asked one of them where the army appeared to be going. He replied, "Some to Warrenton Junction, and some towards Alexandria."--Citizens who live here report that they moved off evidently in great haste and confusion, and were terribly annoyed by our advanced cavalry. It is probably their intention to make a stand on the other side of the Rappahannock, and endeavor to prevent our crossing. Lee is pressing them with great pertinacity. August 23, Saturday.--Twenty-eight miles from Manassas. Four miles from the Rappahannock.--It is now half-past 6 o'clock A. M., and heavy cannonading has commenced upon the front.--Jackson is reported to have sent word to Lee that he is in possession of Warrenton Springs, fifteen miles to the left of Longstreet. Ewell is also said to have crossed the river above the enemy. Two bridges across Cedar Run and the Rapidan having been burned by the enemy, we cannot use the railroad until they have been rebui
R. H. Anderson (search for this): article 10
g away in that direction a train of a thousand wagons. In the meadows at your feet are camps of other wagon trains, containing ordnance, quartermaster and commissary stores, for the use of the various divisions of the army. Several brigades are also bivouacked here, while others are in motion, filing across the country. Roads in superb condition for marching, and weather bracing. The head of Longstreet's corps is now upon the banks of the Rappahannock — Jackson still to the left. Gen. R. H. Anderson's division has just come up from Richmond, and is hurrying forward to the front. It is soon after sunrise and the camps are in a state of bustle — men cooking rations, eating breakfasts, and preparing to resume their march. Near here is where a part of Col. Ashby's old command attacked the enemy's rear guard day before yesterday, and drove them back. Several killed and wounded on both sides. Some twenty Yankee prisoners, captured within the last two days, are confined in the t
others are in motion, filing across the country. Roads in superb condition for marching, and weather bracing. The head of Longstreet's corps is now upon the banks of the Rappahannock — Jackson still to the left. Gen. R. H. Anderson's division has just come up from Richmond, and is hurrying forward to the front. It is soon after sunrise and the camps are in a state of bustle — men cooking rations, eating breakfasts, and preparing to resume their march. Near here is where a part of Col. Ashby's old command attacked the enemy's rear guard day before yesterday, and drove them back. Several killed and wounded on both sides. Some twenty Yankee prisoners, captured within the last two days, are confined in the town. They are generally a miserable, low-lived set of fellows, but evidently glad they are out of tribulation. Not one of them will acknowledge that he belongs to the army of Gen. Pope. They swear that they are Gen. Burnside's men. I asked one of them where the army appea
e their march. Near here is where a part of Col. Ashby's old command attacked the enemy's rear guard day before yesterday, and drove them back. Several killed and wounded on both sides. Some twenty Yankee prisoners, captured within the last two days, are confined in the town. They are generally a miserable, low-lived set of fellows, but evidently glad they are out of tribulation. Not one of them will acknowledge that he belongs to the army of Gen. Pope. They swear that they are Gen. Burnside's men. I asked one of them where the army appeared to be going. He replied, "Some to Warrenton Junction, and some towards Alexandria."--Citizens who live here report that they moved off evidently in great haste and confusion, and were terribly annoyed by our advanced cavalry. It is probably their intention to make a stand on the other side of the Rappahannock, and endeavor to prevent our crossing. Lee is pressing them with great pertinacity. August 23, Saturday.--Twenty-eight mil
longed to the Union army, but in the capacity of an independent scout. He admitted further, that he had observed and reported the movements of our army, but denied having killed the courier. He claimed that it was done by a party of Texas with whom he was traveling. These various facts being conclusive, the court-martial by which he was tried had little hesitation in finding him "guilty," and sentencing him to be hung. The execution took place this afternoon, under the direction of Gen. Evans, in the presence of his brigade and a large number of soldiers. The prisoner was mounted on a horse, his hands tied behind him, and he was driven beneath a tree. The rope, which was little larger than an ordinary bedcord, then being adjusted, he was ordered to stand upon the saddle. As he did so, a soldier gave a sharp cut to the animal, and in a second more the spy was jerking convulsively from the limb above him. He met his fate with great stoicism, and appeared perfectly satisfied wi
lry. It is probably their intention to make a stand on the other side of the Rappahannock, and endeavor to prevent our crossing. Lee is pressing them with great pertinacity. August 23, Saturday.--Twenty-eight miles from Manassas. Four miles from the Rappahannock.--It is now half-past 6 o'clock A. M., and heavy cannonading has commenced upon the front.--Jackson is reported to have sent word to Lee that he is in possession of Warrenton Springs, fifteen miles to the left of Longstreet. Ewell is also said to have crossed the river above the enemy. Two bridges across Cedar Run and the Rapidan having been burned by the enemy, we cannot use the railroad until they have been rebuilt. One of the prisoners states that the iron and materials for the purpose are always near them, and it is understood that the work of reconstruction is rapidly going forward. If this be true, the army can soon be subsisted more conveniently even than at Manassas.--There are no fortifications around Warr
ight, Longstreet's twelve brigades moving toward the Potomac on the right, and Jackson on the left. The latter has passed the Rapidan Station on the Virginia Centraety prisoners went by on their way to the rear. Among the Yankees captured by Jackson were two won, who, as soon as they fell into our hand, commenced to ask after the head of his column, and said: "General, I am the chief courier of Gen. Jackson. He desires me to request you to order your column to be reversed at once."er, however, and remarked:"I am not in the habit of receiving my orders from Gen. Jackson." "Well, sir, those were my orders from him to you." "What cavalry are you fg. The head of Longstreet's corps is now upon the banks of the Rappahannock — Jackson still to the left. Gen. R. H. Anderson's division has just come up from Richmalf-past 6 o'clock A. M., and heavy cannonading has commenced upon the front.--Jackson is reported to have sent word to Lee that he is in possession of Warrenton Spr
1 2 3