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Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 7
ert. Gen. Lee, with his great army, even it undisturbed, cannot remain there. He must advance or fall back. His direct advance has been arrested. He must, therefore, endeavor to push across the Upper Potomac for a raid among the granaries of Maryland, or move back into the Shenandoah valley, or turn his face again towards Richmond, or run the hazards of a demoralized army from starvation or a crushing defeat. The encouraging information received at the War Department from General Pope anush on as fast as possible to Richmond. Meantime the gunboats from Com. Wilkes's squadron, which have been ordered up the Potomac, will doubtless attend to any experiments that may be made by the rebels on the lower river to cross over into Maryland or to interrupt the passage of our transports. Let this suffice to quiet the nerves of such timid souls as may imagine that these gunboats are intended to shell the rebels out of Washington, should they get in by the back door. The gunboats co
White Plains (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 7
nt on the part of the rebels, and their supposed retreating towards Sperryville via Little Washington was also intended for the same purpose. Instead of the whole rebel army moving back, General Lee carefully concealed his main force along the banks of the Rappahannock, while he sent Jackson to Warrenton with 40,000 men, 5,000 of whom were cavalry, under Colonel Lee, to march along the country between the Blue Ridge and Bull Run range of mountains. Jackson concentrated his forces at White Plains and Salem, and sent his cavalry through to reconnoitre. Soon he followed with his infantry, and coming through Thoroughfare Gap he made a forced march until he reached Centreville. From this place he was within striking distance of General Pope's rear, and he improved it, no doubt thinking that he could annihilate the army of Virginia before it could have any succor from Washington.--The cavalry dashes of Col. Lee were thought by some to be too daring if he was not confident of having i
Gibralter (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 7
ning we learn that all our wagons and supplies between here and Barboursville are safe.--Large trains have just arrived. The enemy may surround us and worry us at will, for at least thirty days with fifty thousand men, without doing us serious injury. Our batteries, rifle pits, and sharp-shooters are in such a state of readiness and efficiency that all the army feel that they are ready for the conflict; and the opinion is next to universal that the rebels cannot bring an army against our Gibraltar of sufficient strength to do us much injury. We think they are after our food. If the Buckeyes and Cornerackers bestir themselves they may wreath their brows with many honors by hastening in this direction. A week's rapid marching and efficient fighting would cut off the retreat of the rebels in our rear, and forever extinguish their hopes of the blue grass region of Kentucky. In deed, the right way to protect the towns and cities of Ohio and Kentucky is to push an army through the lat
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 7
arch on without hesitation to Knoxville. Two months ago this could and would have been done with less than half the force now requisite. Delays are dangerous. The Cincinnati Enquirer thus explains the condition of affairs in Kentucky and Tennessee: The number of the enemy on the south side of Cumberland Gap is computed to be 75,000, in command of Generals Floyd and Kirby Smith, while at Chattanooga there is a reserve of 30,000, under Gen. Bragg, to hold in check Gen. Buell, who is m person all Federal movements, will undoubtedly, through Gen. Nelson, drive Scott out of the State, and open up the road between Lexington and the Gap. Many days cannot elapse without a formidable retreat of the enemy from Kentucky and East Tennessee, or a terrible battle. Confederate postage stamps captured. The unloading of the prize steamer Bermuda, now lying at Philadelphia, is progressing. Another discovery has been made by the prize commissioner superintending the unloadi
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 7
of our army on the Rappahannock is now known to have been merely a feint on the part of the rebels, and their supposed retreating towards Sperryville via Little Washington was also intended for the same purpose. Instead of the whole rebel army moving back, General Lee carefully concealed his main force along the banks of the Rappahannock, while he sent Jackson to Warrenton with 40,000 men, 5,000 of whom were cavalry, under Colonel Lee, to march along the country between the Blue Ridge and Bull Run range of mountains. Jackson concentrated his forces at White Plains and Salem, and sent his cavalry through to reconnoitre. Soon he followed with his infantry, and coming through Thoroughfare Gap he made a forced march until he reached Centreville. From this place he was within striking distance of General Pope's rear, and he improved it, no doubt thinking that he could annihilate the army of Virginia before it could have any succor from Washington.--The cavalry dashes of Col. Lee we
Decherd (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 7
The Cincinnati Enquirer thus explains the condition of affairs in Kentucky and Tennessee: The number of the enemy on the south side of Cumberland Gap is computed to be 75,000, in command of Generals Floyd and Kirby Smith, while at Chattanooga there is a reserve of 30,000, under Gen. Bragg, to hold in check Gen. Buell, who is marching up with his entire division to confront Gen. Bragg, who is believed to be moving toward Kentucky or for Nashville. Buell and his army passed through Decherd, forty miles northwest of Chattanooga, on Saturday, and on Monday was within ten miles of the enemy. As communication with Nashville is cut off by railroad and the river, and the troops around Nashville are subsisting on half rations, the transportation of supplies to Buell's forces will cause considerable anxiety, as hitherto they were forwarded via Memphis. The indications are that an immediate engagement will take place between Buell and Bragg, and the forces on the other side of
Salem (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 7
of the rebels, and their supposed retreating towards Sperryville via Little Washington was also intended for the same purpose. Instead of the whole rebel army moving back, General Lee carefully concealed his main force along the banks of the Rappahannock, while he sent Jackson to Warrenton with 40,000 men, 5,000 of whom were cavalry, under Colonel Lee, to march along the country between the Blue Ridge and Bull Run range of mountains. Jackson concentrated his forces at White Plains and Salem, and sent his cavalry through to reconnoitre. Soon he followed with his infantry, and coming through Thoroughfare Gap he made a forced march until he reached Centreville. From this place he was within striking distance of General Pope's rear, and he improved it, no doubt thinking that he could annihilate the army of Virginia before it could have any succor from Washington.--The cavalry dashes of Col. Lee were thought by some to be too daring if he was not confident of having infantry to su
Cumberland Gap (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 7
the shot entered his body just below the hip and came out through the left lung. He probably did not survive long after being wounded. The situation at Cumberland Gap. A correspondent writing from Cumberland Gap, on the 19th ult., says: We continue to have pretty good evidences of a heavy force in front, and at leCumberland Gap, on the 19th ult., says: We continue to have pretty good evidences of a heavy force in front, and at least a body of eight thousand men in our rear, in addition to the parties crowding into Kentucky some distance west of our communications with Lexington and Cincinnati.--This evening we learn that all our wagons and supplies between here and Barboursville are safe.--Large trains have just arrived. The enemy may surround us and worre dangerous. The Cincinnati Enquirer thus explains the condition of affairs in Kentucky and Tennessee: The number of the enemy on the south side of Cumberland Gap is computed to be 75,000, in command of Generals Floyd and Kirby Smith, while at Chattanooga there is a reserve of 30,000, under Gen. Bragg, to hold in check
Sperryville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 7
ress vouches for the correctness of the following statements: Of course the principal topic is how Jackson managed to get around the right wing of General Pope's army, and make his raid upon Manassas Junction, for the purpose of operating in the rear of General Pope's army, while General Lee made the attack on the front. All the six days fighting of our army on the Rappahannock is now known to have been merely a feint on the part of the rebels, and their supposed retreating towards Sperryville via Little Washington was also intended for the same purpose. Instead of the whole rebel army moving back, General Lee carefully concealed his main force along the banks of the Rappahannock, while he sent Jackson to Warrenton with 40,000 men, 5,000 of whom were cavalry, under Colonel Lee, to march along the country between the Blue Ridge and Bull Run range of mountains. Jackson concentrated his forces at White Plains and Salem, and sent his cavalry through to reconnoitre. Soon he f
Warrenton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 7
ose of operating in the rear of General Pope's army, while General Lee made the attack on the front. All the six days fighting of our army on the Rappahannock is now known to have been merely a feint on the part of the rebels, and their supposed retreating towards Sperryville via Little Washington was also intended for the same purpose. Instead of the whole rebel army moving back, General Lee carefully concealed his main force along the banks of the Rappahannock, while he sent Jackson to Warrenton with 40,000 men, 5,000 of whom were cavalry, under Colonel Lee, to march along the country between the Blue Ridge and Bull Run range of mountains. Jackson concentrated his forces at White Plains and Salem, and sent his cavalry through to reconnoitre. Soon he followed with his infantry, and coming through Thoroughfare Gap he made a forced march until he reached Centreville. From this place he was within striking distance of General Pope's rear, and he improved it, no doubt thinking t
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