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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 15, 1862., [Electronic resource].

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Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 1
From our army in Maryland. Our latest news from the army, through private sources, is to Thursday last, which is derived from parties who left Frederick on that day. Up to that time our army was bivouacked around that city, but marching orders had been received. The direction contemplated was not understood by our informants, though it was conjectured that our forces would move on the Relay. Others state that on Thursday morning the army, or a large portion of it, moved in the direction ve on Pennsylvania, with a view to have an opportunity to visit some of the effects of war upon those who have been clamorous for the subjugation of the South. The conduct of our man at Frederick had greatly strengthened feeling in our favor in Maryland, and it was believed that the Unionism which has heretofore existed in the State would materially subside in that part of it occupied by our army. This Unionism has not manifested itself in any offensive form since our forces crossed the Potoma
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 1
bundance at 25 cents per pound. A recruiting office was opened in Frederick immediately after our army took possession of the city, and the Stars and Bars were flung to the . Up to the 10th inst, about fifteen hundred gallant Marylanders, from Frederick and Montgomery counties, had enrolled themselves in the service of the Confederate States. The condition of the army is said to be excellent and the spirits of the men buoyant. The universal desire of the soldiers was to move on Pennsylvania, with a view to have an opportunity to visit some of the effects of war upon those who have been clamorous for the subjugation of the South. The conduct of our man at Frederick had greatly strengthened feeling in our favor in Maryland, and it was believed that the Unionism which has heretofore existed in the State would materially subside in that part of it occupied by our army. This Unionism has not manifested itself in any offensive form since our forces crossed the Potomac. Pass
United States (United States) (search for this): article 1
a At Frederick, hundreds of soldiers purchased shoes at $2.50 to $5. and other articles of clothing at proportionate rates. Coffee was bought by them in great abundance at 25 cents per pound. A recruiting office was opened in Frederick immediately after our army took possession of the city, and the Stars and Bars were flung to the . Up to the 10th inst, about fifteen hundred gallant Marylanders, from Frederick and Montgomery counties, had enrolled themselves in the service of the Confederate States. The condition of the army is said to be excellent and the spirits of the men buoyant. The universal desire of the soldiers was to move on Pennsylvania, with a view to have an opportunity to visit some of the effects of war upon those who have been clamorous for the subjugation of the South. The conduct of our man at Frederick had greatly strengthened feeling in our favor in Maryland, and it was believed that the Unionism which has heretofore existed in the State would materiall
Hagerstown (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 1
ur army in Maryland. Our latest news from the army, through private sources, is to Thursday last, which is derived from parties who left Frederick on that day. Up to that time our army was bivouacked around that city, but marching orders had been received. The direction contemplated was not understood by our informants, though it was conjectured that our forces would move on the Relay. Others state that on Thursday morning the army, or a large portion of it, moved in the direction of Hagerstown. These parties state that our soldiers were receiving every attention from the people of Frederick and the neighborhood, and articles were sold them at rates that seemed admonishingly low, compared with the high prices they have had to pay in Virginia At Frederick, hundreds of soldiers purchased shoes at $2.50 to $5. and other articles of clothing at proportionate rates. Coffee was bought by them in great abundance at 25 cents per pound. A recruiting office was opened in Frederi
Montgomery County (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 1
low, compared with the high prices they have had to pay in Virginia At Frederick, hundreds of soldiers purchased shoes at $2.50 to $5. and other articles of clothing at proportionate rates. Coffee was bought by them in great abundance at 25 cents per pound. A recruiting office was opened in Frederick immediately after our army took possession of the city, and the Stars and Bars were flung to the . Up to the 10th inst, about fifteen hundred gallant Marylanders, from Frederick and Montgomery counties, had enrolled themselves in the service of the Confederate States. The condition of the army is said to be excellent and the spirits of the men buoyant. The universal desire of the soldiers was to move on Pennsylvania, with a view to have an opportunity to visit some of the effects of war upon those who have been clamorous for the subjugation of the South. The conduct of our man at Frederick had greatly strengthened feeling in our favor in Maryland, and it was believed that the
Warrenton (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 1
t. The universal desire of the soldiers was to move on Pennsylvania, with a view to have an opportunity to visit some of the effects of war upon those who have been clamorous for the subjugation of the South. The conduct of our man at Frederick had greatly strengthened feeling in our favor in Maryland, and it was believed that the Unionism which has heretofore existed in the State would materially subside in that part of it occupied by our army. This Unionism has not manifested itself in any offensive form since our forces crossed the Potomac. Passengers by the Central train state that a rumor prevailed at Gordonsville that a body of Yankee cavalry were advancing from Alexandria, in the direction of Warrenton; but this rumor was of so indefinite a character that little attention was given to it. It is by no means unlikely that Yankee raids will be attempted, but we presume the wisdom and prudence of our military authorities have made ample preparation for such contingencies.
William S. Ashe (search for this): article 1
Railroad accident --We regret to learn of the death, by accident, on Friday night, of Hon. Wm. S. Ashe, President of the, Wilmington and Weldon Railroad. While on that road be fell off the cars, and the train passing over him, both legs were severed. He died in a very hours after the accident.
September 13th (search for this): article 1
Fight in Tennessee. Knoxville, Sept. 13. --Lieut.-Colonel Hart's cavalry, belonging to Col. J. Smith's Georgia Legton, have just arrived from Cumberland Mountains.--They encountered Col. Cliffs brigade of renegade Tennesseeans near Jamestown, where a desperate fight took place. Fifty of the enemy were killed, and 20 prisoners and 30 horses captured without lose to the Confederates. Col. Cliff is a prisoner.
Fight in Tennessee. Knoxville, Sept. 13. --Lieut.-Colonel Hart's cavalry, belonging to Col. J. Smith's Georgia Legton, have just arrived from Cumberland Mountains.--They encountered Col. Cliffs brigade of renegade Tennesseeans near Jamestown, where a desperate fight took place. Fifty of the enemy were killed, and 20 prisoners and 30 horses captured without lose to the Confederates. Col. Cliff is a prisoner.
Fight in Tennessee. Knoxville, Sept. 13. --Lieut.-Colonel Hart's cavalry, belonging to Col. J. Smith's Georgia Legton, have just arrived from Cumberland Mountains.--They encountered Col. Cliffs brigade of renegade Tennesseeans near Jamestown, where a desperate fight took place. Fifty of the enemy were killed, and 20 prisoners and 30 horses captured without lose to the Confederates. Col. Cliff is a prisoner.
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