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P., by way of Cardenas. When at Green Key she mounted her guns. She was permitted to remain in Cardenas to the 31st ult., having a Spanish war vessel on each side of her. She has lost many men by yellow fever and desertion.--Amongst the dead is the son of her commander Jno. N. Maffit. The Florida mounts eight very heavy guns, and carries the iron plates for covering her with armor in her hold. Cap'. Maffit was still ill. Her first officer is — Stribling, formerly of the Sumter. On the 1st Inst. the Florida was ordered to sea from Havana, and steamed out in the milder of a severe storm. The Northern Press on the War. The New York Herald has very little editorially except "puffs" of McClellan, who, it says, is now master of the situation, and has it in his power to "pluck the crowning victory of the war." The Boston Argus begs Lincoln to dismiss his Cabinet and make a fresh start. The Philadelphia Inquirer don't feel safe. It wants Philadelphia defended. "It says:
ed at Little Rock, Ark., within the last few days. It was reported at Helena that Gen. Rosecrans made an attack on the rebels at Tupelo, and was decisively repulsed. The 11th, 12th, 13th, 14th and 15th New Jersey regiments, forming the whole of that State's quote under the first call for three hundred thousand volunteers, are now at the seat of war. The 12th, which was the last to leave the State, left Baltimore on Monday for the Relay. House, where it will be stationed. On the 3d inst., the steamer W. B. Terry, with two Dahlgren howitzers on board, while aground in the Tennessee river, at Duck Shoals, 100 miles, above the river's mouth, was captured by guerrillas. There is a report in Massachusetts that Charles Francis Adams, Minister to England, has signified his willingness to change places with Charles Sumner, United States Senator. The Indian hostilities continue. The Governor of Dakota had called out 2,000 men to suppress them. Judge Amidon and his son ha
rew the rebel Stars and Bars to the breeze, from the top of the Court-House, on Sunday, but John M. Herndon, Esq., acting Mayor, being a mild Union man, or at worst a judicious traitor, hauled down the rage, asserting that the occupation by the friends of the South was transient, and that it was folly to make the city unnecessarily odious to the Federal Government. Raids of the rebel Steamers. The New York Herald, of the 11th, says: Our Havana correspondent, waiting on the 6th instant, stated that the rebel steamer Oreto (now named the Florida) had arrived at that port from Nassau, N. P., by way of Cardenas. When at Green Key she mounted her guns. She was permitted to remain in Cardenas to the 31st ult., having a Spanish war vessel on each side of her. She has lost many men by yellow fever and desertion.--Amongst the dead is the son of her commander Jno. N. Maffit. The Florida mounts eight very heavy guns, and carries the iron plates for covering her with armor in h
lingness to change places with Charles Sumner, United States Senator. The Indian hostilities continue. The Governor of Dakota had called out 2,000 men to suppress them. Judge Amidon and his son had been killed by them. Gen, Jim Lane's recruiting operations in Kansas have been most successful. He has raised five white regiments and organized. 1,200 negroes. Col. Fletcher Webster, son of Daniel Webster, who was killed at Manassas, was buried at Boston with great ceremony on the 8th. The State Democratic Convention of New York has nominated Hon. Horatio Seymour for Governor by acclamation. Clement L. Vallandigham has been nominated by the Democracy of the 3d district of Ohio for reelection to Congress. Five thousand one hundred and sixteen soldiers from the North passed through Baltimore on Monday for the sent of war. A "Home Guard" is being raised in Boston.--Every able bodied man is required to do duty. The draft in New Jersey has been indefini
enders as volunteers. There will not be wanting those who, if the danger pass, will be inclined to laugh at all present preparation and precaution; but it will be the vacant laugh of the fool, who could not discern the danger simply because he escaped destruction.--The apathy, the confusion, the want of confidence in military leaders, which are found in Philadelphia to-day, are without a parallel, and will remain so until our advice is followed. A letter from New York, dated the 9th instant, says: The exciting reports from the Upper Potomac and Maryland are making a profound impression upon our people. There is no panic, it is true, and but little actual excitement. The feeling is too deep for either. Men feel, for the first time, that there is at least a possibility that the refluent waves of the rebellion, from Richmond, may sweep near enough their own hearths and homes to make them realize what the horrors of was really ale, and hence, whilst there is every confid
at any price. Important from the West--the Confederates within five miles of Covington. The news from the West is important. The Confederates, numbering about 3,000 infantry and 1,000 cavalry, arrived in sight of Covington, Ky., on the 10th. Business was again suspended in Cincinnati, and military companies were ordered to report for duty at 8 o'clock on the morning of the 11th. Three thousand laborers were ordered to commence work on the trenches. A dispatch from Cincinnati Wednesizen prisoners here from all parts of the country. James S. Smith, Nathan Brice, Tallmadge Thorn. Riot in a New York regiment. The 53d New York regiment, at Harlem, N. Y., in which is included a company of Indians, mutinied on the 10th, after their tents were struck and knapsacks packed to go to Washington. The 8th regiment was sent for to reduce them to subjection.--The Tribune says: The tents were nearly all struck, knapsacks packed, and nearly everything in readiness f
occupation by the friends of the South was transient, and that it was folly to make the city unnecessarily odious to the Federal Government. Raids of the rebel Steamers. The New York Herald, of the 11th, says: Our Havana correspondent, waiting on the 6th instant, stated that the rebel steamer Oreto (now named the Florida) had arrived at that port from Nassau, N. P., by way of Cardenas. When at Green Key she mounted her guns. She was permitted to remain in Cardenas to the 31st ult., having a Spanish war vessel on each side of her. She has lost many men by yellow fever and desertion.--Amongst the dead is the son of her commander Jno. N. Maffit. The Florida mounts eight very heavy guns, and carries the iron plates for covering her with armor in her hold. Cap'. Maffit was still ill. Her first officer is — Stribling, formerly of the Sumter. On the 1st Inst. the Florida was ordered to sea from Havana, and steamed out in the milder of a severe storm. The Northern
September 10th (search for this): article 9
ck. A force of from 5,000 to 20,000 Confederates were reported to be at New Market, on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, about nine miles from Frederick. They are said to be under the command of Gen Fitzhugh Lee. The Confederates were entrenching themselves at Monocracy, and had blown up the bridge there. They had entered York county. Pa. The report from there says they are in "a state of great destitution, and shoeless." Their intentions are thus described in a letter from Baltimore, September 10th: They were to invade Pennsylvania with a force so strong as to make resistance on the part of the Pennsylvanians troops unavailing; to proceed to Harrisburg and capture that city; to destroy, if possible, the Pennsylvania Central Railroad; to strike for the town of York, Pennsylvania, and to destroy the railroad leading from Harrisburg to Baltimore, and to destroy also a portion of the railroad between Baltimore and Havre de Grace so as to cut off all communication by railroad betwee
September 7th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 9
s, and the hacks in others. The battle-field was in possession of the enemy; and, in fact, there was nothing for the volunteers to do but walk back — a pleasant prospect, which a number of them at once proceeded to realize. A few went forward at all risks toward the field, to carry out the purpose which led them there. These got captured by the rebels. The following letter was received at Varina by flag of truce from three of the sufferers who "got captured:" Libby Prison, Sept. 7, 1862. Arrived here yesterday after ten days hard march, and were immediately placed in the tobacco prison, together with several hundred other unfortunates. We sincerely hope that Mr. Willard, of Washington, and the rest of our many friends, will use their utmost influence to have us exchanged in place of the rebel prisoners taken at Fairfax, and now at Washington. To our families we can only say we are well, and living in hopes of soon being exchanged. We can write but little. Remem
October, 9 AD (search for this): article 9
of truce at present. An appeal was then made to General Kirby Smith, who promptly allowed our ambulances to proceed. Our scouts report that the rebels are moving in two divisions, numbering 16,000 men. Early this morning a large rebel cavalry force attacked our pickets on Licking river, driving them back a mile, several of whom were wounded. Our whole force over the rive was drawn up in line of battle at noon to day. One of our men was killed in the picket skirmish. Louisville,Sept. 10--Hon. Richard Apperson, from Mount Sterling, reports Humphrey Marshall, there, with 4,000 troops, including cavalry and artillery, arresting citizens, searching houses, &c. It is reported that a force of rebel cavalry took possession of Kininence, Ky, last night. John H Morgan occupies the Observer and Reporter office as headquarters. Hon. Joshua F. Bell, recently unconditionally released by the rebels, arrived at the Galt House to-day. It is rumored that about 4,000 rebels from Lexingto
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