hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in descending order. Sort in ascending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
Maryland (Maryland, United States) 24 0 Browse Search
Gen McClellan 20 0 Browse Search
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) 18 0 Browse Search
Gen Fitzhugh Lee 18 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 14 0 Browse Search
Hagerstown (Maryland, United States) 14 0 Browse Search
Jackson 13 1 Browse Search
Columbus O'Donnell 13 1 Browse Search
Poolesville (Maryland, United States) 10 0 Browse Search
Bradley T. Johnson 8 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: September 15, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 349 total hits in 119 results.

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Washington county (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 9
ave received from correspondents of the New York papers as to the force in which the rebels have crossed into Maryland, entirely disagree with any-accounts that have been received here from fugitives from Frederick county. No one who has yet arrived here speaks of having seen more than fifteen thousand men, while some of the Northern correspondents vouch for an army of from sixty thousand to one hundred thousand.--The following note, received last night from a respectable gentleman of Washington county, places the number still lower: "As the movement and number of rebel troops now in Maryland are greatly exaggerated, I beg leave — being, perhaps, the last person from the locality — to make a fair statement of what I conceive to be their numbers and designs. They do not exceed five thousand, but, being mostly cavalry, move very quickly, and, like most of my neighbors of Frederick and Washington counties, if I had never seen the military parents around Washington, I should fix th
Washington (United States) (search for this): article 9
and.--The following note, received last night from a respectable gentleman of Washington county, places the number still lower: "As the movement and number of rebel troops now in Maryland are greatly exaggerated, I beg leave — being, perhaps, the last person from the locality — to make a fair statement of what I conceive to be their numbers and designs. They do not exceed five thousand, but, being mostly cavalry, move very quickly, and, like most of my neighbors of Frederick and Washington counties, if I had never seen the military parents around Washington, I should fix their number at from fifty thousand to seventy-five thousand They are moving (if it possesses a military strategy) to draw from the defence of Washington as many troops as possible, so as to fail on that city with a great force; for they are prepared to recross the Potomac at any time in a few home." Exciting Humors. The rumors in Baltimore last evening among the Secession sympathizers were of the most
Marysville (California, United States) (search for this): article 9
tate of affairs. It says: He reached a position on the mountains overlooking Frederick, and, by means of a glass, saw all that was going on in town. He arrived there about eleven o'clock this morning, and says there was evidently a movement of troops in the direction of Middletown and Boonsboro' going on. Farmers informed him that a forward movement began at three this morning — supposed to be about twenty thousand. The messenger then crossed the mountain to within two miles of Marysville, and reached a position overlooking Boonsboro'. He saw three regiments of infantry, one of cavalry, eight cannon, and a large number of wagons. The soldiers looked ragged, shoeless, and hatless. It is now certain that no rebels had entered Hagerstown at six P. M. Jackson undoubtedly moved from Boonsboro' towards Hagerstown; but there is nothing reliable as to his near approach to Hagerstown. He may be moving to Williamsport to cut off General White, now at Martinsburg and Harper's F
South Dakota (South Dakota, United States) (search for this): article 9
Monday for the Relay. House, where it will be stationed. On the 3d inst., the steamer W. B. Terry, with two Dahlgren howitzers on board, while aground in the Tennessee river, at Duck Shoals, 100 miles, above the river's mouth, was captured by guerrillas. There is a report in Massachusetts that Charles Francis Adams, Minister to England, has signified his willingness to change places with Charles Sumner, United States Senator. The Indian hostilities continue. The Governor of Dakota had called out 2,000 men to suppress them. Judge Amidon and his son had been killed by them. Gen, Jim Lane's recruiting operations in Kansas have been most successful. He has raised five white regiments and organized. 1,200 negroes. Col. Fletcher Webster, son of Daniel Webster, who was killed at Manassas, was buried at Boston with great ceremony on the 8th. The State Democratic Convention of New York has nominated Hon. Horatio Seymour for Governor by acclamation. Clement
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 9
from Baltimore, September 10th: They were to invade Pennsylvania with a force so strong as to make resistance on the parcattle, and would probably enter the border counties of Pennsylvania for this purpose if sufficient time was given them to a Maryland troops cannot be relied on. The panic in Pennsylvania--the Stampede. The "very latest" intelligence publis from a State messenger who was sent by the Governor of Pennsylvania to ascertain the state of affairs. It says: He rad and telegraph are still untouched. The people of Pennsylvania are now thoroughly aroused, and one thousand men from Burg, he will be required to meet and overcome 50,000 of Pennsylvania's yeomanry General Wool has been assigned to the cat Hanover. A letter from Lancaster, the capital of Pennsylvania, dated the 9th, says the "rebels" have not advanced be which the rebels can hope to accomplish by a raid upon Pennsylvania, and these are the breaking of the Northern Central Rai
Sharpsburg (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 9
ays great numbers threw themselves down in the middle of the road, attacked with bilious cholic, caused by eating green corn. A skirmish took place between the Michigan cavalry and Virginia cavalry leading the rebel advance at Barnesville. A rebel lieutenant was killed and two privates were captured. They say Jackson lead; the column. The rebel pickets were within a mile and a half of Hagerstown at eight this morning. The main body appears to be going between Barnesville and Sharpsburg, eight miles below Hagerstown. The rebel pickets uniformly told the farmers that Jackson leads the rebel army, and the Cumberland Valley is their destination. Much excitement prevailed in Greencastle, Pa.' about thirty-two miles from Frederick, Wednesday night about the "rebels." A dispatch from there says: They are said to be advancing towards that place by way of Cavetown, so as to get in the rear and cut off the retreat of those who might attempt to get away. Up to five
Harlem (New York, United States) (search for this): article 9
t influence to have us exchanged in place of the rebel prisoners taken at Fairfax, and now at Washington. To our families we can only say we are well, and living in hopes of soon being exchanged. We can write but little. Remember us to all our friends. We shall write to you as often as possible. There are 130 citizen prisoners here from all parts of the country. James S. Smith, Nathan Brice, Tallmadge Thorn. Riot in a New York regiment. The 53d New York regiment, at Harlem, N. Y., in which is included a company of Indians, mutinied on the 10th, after their tents were struck and knapsacks packed to go to Washington. The 8th regiment was sent for to reduce them to subjection.--The Tribune says: The tents were nearly all struck, knapsacks packed, and nearly everything in readiness for departure, when, it is stated, the men became clamorous for their back pay, and expressed their determination not to leave until they had received it. In anticipation of difficu
Alleghany River (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 9
med and equipped, and there are 5,000 more in the county ready to rush to the rescue at a moment's notice, and teach the rebels a lesson that they would not forget in a hurry if they attempted to invade the Southern counties. These Home Guards are drilling every day, and are now quite an efficient force. A proclamation from the Mayor has been issued strongly supporting the one from the Governor regarding the arming of the State. The rebels cannot advance to Harrisburg across the Susquehanna river without encountering a force in their front perhaps as large as their own, independent of the army which would certainly fall upon their rear in such an event. There is a fond at a place called Peach Bottom, on the Susquehanna, about twenty miles from here, by which the enemy might attempt a demonstration against Philadelphia. Even a demonstration of this kind is exceedingly improbable. There are two, and only two, objects, I am now satisfied, which the rebels can hope to accomplish
Greencastle (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 9
the rebel advance at Barnesville. A rebel lieutenant was killed and two privates were captured. They say Jackson lead; the column. The rebel pickets were within a mile and a half of Hagerstown at eight this morning. The main body appears to be going between Barnesville and Sharpsburg, eight miles below Hagerstown. The rebel pickets uniformly told the farmers that Jackson leads the rebel army, and the Cumberland Valley is their destination. Much excitement prevailed in Greencastle, Pa.' about thirty-two miles from Frederick, Wednesday night about the "rebels." A dispatch from there says: They are said to be advancing towards that place by way of Cavetown, so as to get in the rear and cut off the retreat of those who might attempt to get away. Up to five P. M. no signs of the enemy appeared at any point, although'some two hours previous a negro among others reported them within three miles of the town. The people there were very much excited, and numbers
Nassau River (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 9
Herndon, Esq., acting Mayor, being a mild Union man, or at worst a judicious traitor, hauled down the rage, asserting that the occupation by the friends of the South was transient, and that it was folly to make the city unnecessarily odious to the Federal Government. Raids of the rebel Steamers. The New York Herald, of the 11th, says: Our Havana correspondent, waiting on the 6th instant, stated that the rebel steamer Oreto (now named the Florida) had arrived at that port from Nassau, N. P., by way of Cardenas. When at Green Key she mounted her guns. She was permitted to remain in Cardenas to the 31st ult., having a Spanish war vessel on each side of her. She has lost many men by yellow fever and desertion.--Amongst the dead is the son of her commander Jno. N. Maffit. The Florida mounts eight very heavy guns, and carries the iron plates for covering her with armor in her hold. Cap'. Maffit was still ill. Her first officer is — Stribling, formerly of the Sumter. On t
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...