hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
United States (United States) 28 0 Browse Search
Andy Johnson 16 0 Browse Search
Don Carlos Buell 13 1 Browse Search
William H. Seward 12 0 Browse Search
Mary E. Hill 12 0 Browse Search
McClellan 10 0 Browse Search
D. R. Jones 10 0 Browse Search
Rosecrans 9 1 Browse Search
Pope 8 0 Browse Search
Richmond (Virginia, United States) 8 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: September 18, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 5 total hits in 3 results.

Nassau River (Florida, United States) (search for this): article 5
r at Mobile. The Augusta and Atlanta papers publish a dispatch from Mobile announcing the arrival of "an iron clad man of war" at that port. The statement is incorrect. A special correspondent at Mobile furnishes the Charleston Mercury with some authentic information in regard to the arrival referred to: The vessel is the steam corvette Oreto, now called the Florida, and is not an iron clad. Our readers are aware of the difficulties which the commander of this ship encountered at Nassau, owing to the rigor of the British centrality regulations.--Having finally escaped from the clutches of the Court of Admiralty, Capt. Maflitt steamed away to the Gulf, and boldly ran the gauntlet of the blockaders at the merit of Mobile Bay, in broad day light, on the 4th inst. The Captain was at the time sick with fever, as were most of her small crew of thirteen men. The Florida ran within sixty yards of the Yankee vessels, and her sides are peppered all over with shrapnel and grape shot.
port. The statement is incorrect. A special correspondent at Mobile furnishes the Charleston Mercury with some authentic information in regard to the arrival referred to: The vessel is the steam corvette Oreto, now called the Florida, and is not an iron clad. Our readers are aware of the difficulties which the commander of this ship encountered at Nassau, owing to the rigor of the British centrality regulations.--Having finally escaped from the clutches of the Court of Admiralty, Capt. Maflitt steamed away to the Gulf, and boldly ran the gauntlet of the blockaders at the merit of Mobile Bay, in broad day light, on the 4th inst. The Captain was at the time sick with fever, as were most of her small crew of thirteen men. The Florida ran within sixty yards of the Yankee vessels, and her sides are peppered all over with shrapnel and grape shot. One eleven inch shell went through her side a foot above the water line, and lodged in the "coal bunkers." The Florida is a beautiful and
egard to the arrival referred to: The vessel is the steam corvette Oreto, now called the Florida, and is not an iron clad. Our readers are aware of the difficulties which the commander of this ship encountered at Nassau, owing to the rigor of the British centrality regulations.--Having finally escaped from the clutches of the Court of Admiralty, Capt. Maflitt steamed away to the Gulf, and boldly ran the gauntlet of the blockaders at the merit of Mobile Bay, in broad day light, on the 4th inst. The Captain was at the time sick with fever, as were most of her small crew of thirteen men. The Florida ran within sixty yards of the Yankee vessels, and her sides are peppered all over with shrapnel and grape shot. One eleven inch shell went through her side a foot above the water line, and lodged in the "coal bunkers." The Florida is a beautiful and well armed carved of great speed. Her armament consists of eight guns. Her dash through the blockaders, with a sick crew of only thirtee