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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: September 26, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Minnesota (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): article 6
ttles in Western Maryland: Major-General Hooker, wounded the foot; Major-General Sedgwick, wounded severely in three places; Major General Rodman, mortally wounded. Major-General Richardson, wounded in shoulder severely; Brigadier-General Mansfield, killed; Brigadier General Hartsuft, severely; Brigadier-General Dana, slight; Brigadier-General Weber, Brigadier-General Duryea, all slightly wounded. The Indian War — Dreadful Atrocities. Lincoln has authorized the Governor of Minnesota to let the draft go by default, and attend to the Indians. The troops raising in that State are therefore, to be sent to the frontier. The Manchester Record gives an account of the massacre at Lake Shetek. Seven of the survivors have reached that town, among them several women. The Record says: Mrs. Eastlick thinks the Lake Shotek settlement was attacked by about ten Indians. Mr. Ireland was left on the prairie apparently mortally wounded. Mrs. Eastlick supposed to be dead; one
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 6
, does not claim the Sharpsburg fight as a Federal victory, but says it can safely say that "our arms suffered no disaster." Scenes after the surrender of Harper's Ferry. A Federal letter from Harper's Ferry says that no sooner had the rebels taken possession of our camps than officers and men of both armies sat down to frHarper's Ferry says that no sooner had the rebels taken possession of our camps than officers and men of both armies sat down to friendly conversation, which was kept up during most of the day. It adds: It must be said to their honor that the rebels conducted themselves in the most unexceptionable manner, from the highest officer down. Your correspondent spent several hours in agreeable conversation, sounding them on the great question and other matterslict. Destruction of Harper's Ferry bridge. The American says: It is believed that the rebels have taken the opportunity of their occupation of Harper's Ferry to inflict another serious injury upon the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. From information, believed altogether reliable, we learn that they have not only dest
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 6
ter from Harper's Ferry says that no sooner had the rebels taken possession of our camps than officers and men of both armies sat down to friendly conversation, which was kept up during most of the day. It adds: It must be said to their honor that the rebels conducted themselves in the most unexceptionable manner, from the highest officer down. Your correspondent spent several hours in agreeable conversation, sounding them on the great question and other matters. "We have," said a South Carolina Captain, "150,000 men on Maryland soil, but we do not come as an army of invasion. You go your way and we will go ours." "What do you think about pushing us to the wall now?" playfully remarked another to me.--"How about that onward to Richmond!" inquired a third "Cincinnati is ours, and so will Washington soon be," said a Georgian. A Virginia Secessionist informed me that Ewell was wounded at Manassas and is now at Winchester. Lee they considered their most able General, Jac
Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 6
the most unexceptionable manner, from the highest officer down. Your correspondent spent several hours in agreeable conversation, sounding them on the great question and other matters. "We have," said a South Carolina Captain, "150,000 men on Maryland soil, but we do not come as an army of invasion. You go your way and we will go ours." "What do you think about pushing us to the wall now?" playfully remarked another to me.--"How about that onward to Richmond!" inquired a third "Cincinnaipated and asks for authority to have two regiments of volunteers mounted to pursue the Indian war parties. Yankee Generals wounded. The following is a complete list of casualties among the Yankee general officers in the battles in Western Maryland: Major-General Hooker, wounded the foot; Major-General Sedgwick, wounded severely in three places; Major General Rodman, mortally wounded. Major-General Richardson, wounded in shoulder severely; Brigadier-General Mansfield, killed; Br
Quiquechan River (Massachusetts, United States) (search for this): article 6
ged at the time of their death in gathering wheat. The rack of a wagon was near them, as if thrown off, and the tennis taken by the Indians. The head of one was revered from the body, and both were pierced by bullets. Judging from the clothing and shoes about this house the family included other children, but not traces of them could be found. The tax Gaining War home to them. The war tax is making the people of the North feel that they are at war and paying heavily for it. The Fall River (Mass News says September harshened in a strange politics to disparaging for the "American people," It says: The excise law went into operation yesterday. September 1st. It marks a in our national history. Hitherto, the war which we have been waging for the Union had been with nearly only a brilliant sentiment fancy, or more a heavy price in blood and life, thousand; have been compelled to offer at the devastating war the oblation of calling tears and heart aches, but the masse
Lake Shetek (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): article 6
in shoulder severely; Brigadier-General Mansfield, killed; Brigadier General Hartsuft, severely; Brigadier-General Dana, slight; Brigadier-General Weber, Brigadier-General Duryea, all slightly wounded. The Indian War — Dreadful Atrocities. Lincoln has authorized the Governor of Minnesota to let the draft go by default, and attend to the Indians. The troops raising in that State are therefore, to be sent to the frontier. The Manchester Record gives an account of the massacre at Lake Shetek. Seven of the survivors have reached that town, among them several women. The Record says: Mrs. Eastlick thinks the Lake Shotek settlement was attacked by about ten Indians. Mr. Ireland was left on the prairie apparently mortally wounded. Mrs. Eastlick supposed to be dead; one of her children, a boy twelve years of age, was unharmed, with his brother, twelve months old, in his arms, and another brother, six years old, lying in the grass mortally wounded. Messrs. Everett and Hatc
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 6
, mortally wounded. Major-General Richardson, wounded in shoulder severely; Brigadier-General Mansfield, killed; Brigadier General Hartsuft, severely; Brigadier-General Dana, slight; Brigadier-General Weber, Brigadier-General Duryea, all slightly wounded. The Indian War — Dreadful Atrocities. Lincoln has authorized the Governor of Minnesota to let the draft go by default, and attend to the Indians. The troops raising in that State are therefore, to be sent to the frontier. The Manchester Record gives an account of the massacre at Lake Shetek. Seven of the survivors have reached that town, among them several women. The Record says: Mrs. Eastlick thinks the Lake Shotek settlement was attacked by about ten Indians. Mr. Ireland was left on the prairie apparently mortally wounded. Mrs. Eastlick supposed to be dead; one of her children, a boy twelve years of age, was unharmed, with his brother, twelve months old, in his arms, and another brother, six years old, lying in
ll be most bitterly felt in Northern families. Sketch, Designs at the West. The following paragraph, under the above caption, appears in the editorial department of the American: Gen. Jos. E. Johnston has been assigned to a rebel command west of the Mississippi. This means business at the West. It means something different from the sort of campaigning indulged in by Pike, McCullough, Van-Dorn, Hindman, and their associates. Our Government is therefore required to reinforce Butler, to strengthen Cairo, and to look to it that the Mississippi is kept open and free from obstruction. General Pope telegraphs from the West that the Indians are more formidable than he anticipated and asks for authority to have two regiments of volunteers mounted to pursue the Indian war parties. Yankee Generals wounded. The following is a complete list of casualties among the Yankee general officers in the battles in Western Maryland: Major-General Hooker, wounded the fo
Yankee Generals (search for this): article 6
ns something different from the sort of campaigning indulged in by Pike, McCullough, Van-Dorn, Hindman, and their associates. Our Government is therefore required to reinforce Butler, to strengthen Cairo, and to look to it that the Mississippi is kept open and free from obstruction. General Pope telegraphs from the West that the Indians are more formidable than he anticipated and asks for authority to have two regiments of volunteers mounted to pursue the Indian war parties. Yankee Generals wounded. The following is a complete list of casualties among the Yankee general officers in the battles in Western Maryland: Major-General Hooker, wounded the foot; Major-General Sedgwick, wounded severely in three places; Major General Rodman, mortally wounded. Major-General Richardson, wounded in shoulder severely; Brigadier-General Mansfield, killed; Brigadier General Hartsuft, severely; Brigadier-General Dana, slight; Brigadier-General Weber, Brigadier-General Duryea, al
l slightly wounded. The Indian War — Dreadful Atrocities. Lincoln has authorized the Governor of Minnesota to let the draft go by default, and attend to the Indians. The troops raising in that State are therefore, to be sent to the frontier. The Manchester Record gives an account of the massacre at Lake Shetek. Seven of the survivors have reached that town, among them several women. The Record says: Mrs. Eastlick thinks the Lake Shotek settlement was attacked by about ten Indians. Mr. Ireland was left on the prairie apparently mortally wounded. Mrs. Eastlick supposed to be dead; one of her children, a boy twelve years of age, was unharmed, with his brother, twelve months old, in his arms, and another brother, six years old, lying in the grass mortally wounded. Messrs. Everett and Hatch, themselves badly wounded, could render no assistance in saving these children, and they were left on the prairie at the mercy of the Indians or to die of starvation. Mr. Hurd had
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