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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: October 2, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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Connecticut (Connecticut, United States) (search for this): article 6
The British press of President Davis's message. The English papers of the 7th, received by the Arabia, contain comments on President. Davis's message to Congress. The Daily News and Spectator are the most extreme Hall Abolition organs in England, and bowl over every reverse of the Federal as loudly as the Yankee of Connecticut. [from the London Times, Sept. 5.] Mr. Davis reserves all the vigor of his style to denounce the manner in which the war is carried on by his antagonist. The passion engendered by defeat have changed the character of hostilities — have introduced rapine and wanton destruction of property, war upon non combatant the murder of captives, bloody threats to avenge the death of an invading soldiery, orders of banishment against the peaceful cultivators of the soil. To the evils of which the President complaint — and it to be feared with only too much justice — he adds the Confiscation act, the forging of the of the Southern States and, last of all<
th, it might have been hoped that some toleration would been tended to those on which the fight dawned more slowly. The President, however, now proposes death as the penalty of doubting it. Those who in any shape recognize the equality of the two races will be henceforth dealt with as felons, "hung or shot, as may be most convenient," when they get within the power of the Confederation. [from the Spectator, Sept. 6.] Mr. Jefferson Davis has issued another of his able messages — in English, that contrasts strongly with the chequered grammar and laborious obscurity in which Mr. Lincoln shadows forth the travail of his soul, and far superior in composition to the ordinary Queen's speeches. He is, however, less self contained than usual, inveighs against the barbarities of the Union troops, and panegyrics the innate humanity and tenderness of his own in language that invites criticism to the practice known to have prevailed in the Confederate camp of turning the skulls and bone
ve changed the character of hostilities — have introduced rapine and wanton destruction of property, war upon non combatant the murder of captives, bloody threats to avenge the death of an invading soldiery, orders of banishment against the peaceful cultivators of the soil. To the evils of which the President complaint — and it to be feared with only too much justice — he adds the Confiscation act, the forging of the of the Southern States and, last of all, the shameful proclamation of Gen. Butler. The is summed up by the statement that stern and exemplary punishment can and must be mated the murderers and fellows, who, disgracing the profession of . Mr. Davis makes no setter of the hard necessities which the war imposes. He recommends a law to include in the conscription persons from 35 to 45 years of age. He does not apprehend that any forth will be necessary, but the very large purpose under 25 years of age is already in the field, and that there will be no reluctanc<
Jefferson Davis (search for this): article 6
The British press of President Davis's message. The English papers of the 7th, received by the Arabia, contain comments on President. Davis's message to CongreDavis's message to Congress. The Daily News and Spectator are the most extreme Hall Abolition organs in England, and bowl over every reverse of the Federal as loudly as the Yankee of Connecticut. [from the London Times, Sept. 5.] Mr. Davis reserves all the vigor of his style to denounce the manner in which the war is carried on by his antagonbe mated the murderers and fellows, who, disgracing the profession of . Mr. Davis makes no setter of the hard necessities which the war imposes. He recommends outrage against civilization itself. In the euphemistic phraseology of Mr. Jefferson Davis's address, the measures embodying this policy which he recommends for ad the power of the Confederation. [from the Spectator, Sept. 6.] Mr. Jefferson Davis has issued another of his able messages — in English, that contrasts str
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): article 6
ey get within the power of the Confederation. [from the Spectator, Sept. 6.] Mr. Jefferson Davis has issued another of his able messages — in English, that contrasts strongly with the chequered grammar and laborious obscurity in which Mr. Lincoln shadows forth the travail of his soul, and far superior in composition to the ordinary Queen's speeches. He is, however, less self contained than usual, inveighs against the barbarities of the Union troops, and panegyrics the innate humanity t day proposing to enact that "armies incongruously composed of white and black, shall not be entitled to the privilege of war, or to be taken prisoners;" that the captured negroes should be "publicly add," and the "commanders hanged or shot as most convenient." We trust this measure will pass and that Mr. Lincoln will publish it thoroughly in the North, inviting at the same time the aid of the colored people. With this prospect before them in case of capture, they would make good soldiers.
June, 9 AD (search for this): article 6
vine ordinance. But as the Confederacy was the first to make the brilliant truth, it might have been hoped that some toleration would been tended to those on which the fight dawned more slowly. The President, however, now proposes death as the penalty of doubting it. Those who in any shape recognize the equality of the two races will be henceforth dealt with as felons, "hung or shot, as may be most convenient," when they get within the power of the Confederation. [from the Spectator, Sept. 6.] Mr. Jefferson Davis has issued another of his able messages — in English, that contrasts strongly with the chequered grammar and laborious obscurity in which Mr. Lincoln shadows forth the travail of his soul, and far superior in composition to the ordinary Queen's speeches. He is, however, less self contained than usual, inveighs against the barbarities of the Union troops, and panegyrics the innate humanity and tenderness of his own in language that invites criticism to the practice
May, 9 AD (search for this): article 6
nts on President. Davis's message to Congress. The Daily News and Spectator are the most extreme Hall Abolition organs in England, and bowl over every reverse of the Federal as loudly as the Yankee of Connecticut. [from the London Times, Sept. 5.] Mr. Davis reserves all the vigor of his style to denounce the manner in which the war is carried on by his antagonist. The passion engendered by defeat have changed the character of hostilities — have introduced rapine and wanton destructind look forward to the possibility of loss and failure. Such men would seem worthy of a better destiny than to be dragged at the chariot-wheels of a conquering democracy, and to live under a perpetual reign of terror. [from the Daily News, Sept. 5.] The Southern President is a man of natural sagacity and considerable cultivation, combined with large political experience, and his official speeches are addressed to Europe as well as America. As a practiced speaker, he knows how to veil