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ity of their political condition is lost. Return of Lincoln to Washington — his speeches in Maryland. Lincoln retuLincoln returned to Washington on the evening of the 4th inst., and immediately held a closet interview with his Secretary of War, and afate circles a here drinking is done — the common toast is "Lincoln's proclamation, little McClellan, Burnside, and the Union York Times, writing from Harper's Ferry about the visit of Lincoln to the army, laments the great change in it since the visie I know not what reflections occupied the mind of Mr. Lincoln as be passed by the battle-scarred ensigns that met him ance which it would not otherwise possess. He approves of Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation and recommends it to the electthe country into difficulty. Who got it in difficulty? Mr. Lincoln found the Government in difficulty, the army surrenderedtate of anarchy, that he, (the speaker,) standing behind Mr. Lincoln at the time of his inauguration, expected momentarily to
Detective Baker (search for this): article 1
of male population there is taking place into Virginia. The lower counties of the State will not be able to furnish more than a fourth part of their quota under the draft. It every male individual of Charles and St. Mary's counties were to be impressed, still the quotas of these two counties would remain unfilled. Most of the young men of this region are now serving in the rebel army. Geo. D. Spencer, an officer of the Criminal Court of this district, was to- day by order of Chief Detective Baker, on the charge of disloyalty. In conversation he endorsed the action of the rebel Government in raising the black flag, and said it should have been done long ago. He will be sent to the Old Capitol prison. Exchange of prisoners — Affairs at Suffolk A letter dated Norfolk, the 3d inst., says Lieut. Col. has been entrusted with the arrangement of the exchange and that "the next of the Commissioners will prove very important." my is known to have massed considerab
Horace Greeley (search for this): article 1
on the 21 instant, at which resolutions were adopted stigmatizing the Democratic State ticket as "the representative of treason at the North." The Star Spangled Banner, and a celebrated negro retrain called "Old Shandy," having been sung, Mr. Horace Greeley took the stand: Mr. Greeley said he had not met three men together since the emancipation proclamation who were not happy. Europe had seen both the North and South fighting to sustain slavery, and could see no difference between us. BMr. Greeley said he had not met three men together since the emancipation proclamation who were not happy. Europe had seen both the North and South fighting to sustain slavery, and could see no difference between us. But the issue was now between the Union and slavery, and slavery must go down. [Applause] Every man must admit that our chances of success are greater than they were before the proclamation. We had begun to strike our enemy in his weakest point. Perhaps the President waited longer than he should, [laughter,] but that very hesitancy gave the measure finally its fullest force. He did not believe there was one man in the Cabinet who did not think that, if we put down the rebellion, we must put
nd its support of all measures aimed at the rebellion, were referred to appropriate committees, instructed to report on Thursday next. The red flannel badge. The following paragraph is from the Baltimore American: Some time since the lamented General Kearney ordered his officers to wear, sewed on their caps, a square bit of red flannel, that he might the more easily recognise them. They have determined to adopt this red badge as an honorary distinction, and their now commander General Stoneman, approves of it. Field and staff officers wear it on the crown of their caps, line officers on the front of their caps, and privates on the right side. In the next fight in which they may be engaged, Kearney's men, with their badge, will avenge their beloved commander. The New York Stock Market. The New York Herald, of the 6th, says there was no abatement of speculative excitement on Saturday, and adds: At the first board there was an advance of 3 per cent in Missou
of Maryland. Affairs in Washington. The Washington dispatches of the 5th, in the New York papers, contain some matters of interest Col. H. F. Saunders, of the 19th Wisconsin, has been dismissed from the service. About 2,000 soldiers of Pope's army are still straggling about Washington. Pope is to return to that city shortly to testify in the Bull Run defeat case. W. J. Florence, the actor, had been badly injured by being thrown from his horse. We give the following from the dispatPope is to return to that city shortly to testify in the Bull Run defeat case. W. J. Florence, the actor, had been badly injured by being thrown from his horse. We give the following from the dispatches: The Washington correspondent of a Western journal states that Gen. McClernand denies having endorsed the President's emancipation proclamation, and pronounces the statements published in the papers as unqualifiedly false. It is reported that the new nine months regiments, now being raised in Massachusetts, are to be sent to North Carolina, where there are other regiments from the Old Bay State. It is stated by deserters and prisoners coming within our lines at Harper's Ferr
Longstreet (search for this): article 1
the statements published in the papers as unqualifiedly false. It is reported that the new nine months regiments, now being raised in Massachusetts, are to be sent to North Carolina, where there are other regiments from the Old Bay State. It is stated by deserters and prisoners coming within our lines at Harper's Ferry in the last forty-eight hours, that Gen. Lee is now making every preparation to retreat with his whole army so soon as Gen. McClellan may move against him. Gen. Longstreet is making his stay at the residence of Charles J. Faulkner at Martinsburg; Gen. Lee stops with Dr. Hammond at North Mountain, and "Stonewall" Jackson continues about "in spots," as heretofore. General Dole, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, has returned to the city from his onerous not to say dangerous. Northwestern trip to pacify the Indiana. He reports that the Chippewas are quiet, and have agreed to pay damages for the property of the Government that they have taken. There was
Horatin Seymour (search for this): article 1
ht his nomination the beat plan of sustaining the President. [Applause.] The proclamation was radical yesterday — it is conservative to-day.--He believed they would get more Democratic votes than if we had nominated a Democrat for Governor. Mr. Seymour says the Republicans cannot carry on the Government, and that it got the country into difficulty. Who got it in difficulty? Mr. Lincoln found the Government in difficulty, the army surrendered and the navy scattered. We were in such a state on Saturday. The attendance was large, and a question of the forms of the Rubric, and of special prayer in reference to the present national emergency led to protracted and animated debates.--The feature of the session was the address of Hon. Horatin Seymour candidate for the Governorship of New York, who while favoring a special form of prayer, adjured the Convention to deal gently with their absent brethren of the South, in view of an early possible reconciliation. Rev. Dr. Hawks also very
H. F. Saunders (search for this): article 1
waving his hat, and continued doing so until the train was lost in the distance. "Three cheers for the hope of America," was called out by one stentorian voice in front of Mrs. Ramsey's house, and the reception which our President received here shows that that is the estimate put upon him by the good people of Frederick, and indeed the whole of Maryland. Affairs in Washington. The Washington dispatches of the 5th, in the New York papers, contain some matters of interest Col. H. F. Saunders, of the 19th Wisconsin, has been dismissed from the service. About 2,000 soldiers of Pope's army are still straggling about Washington. Pope is to return to that city shortly to testify in the Bull Run defeat case. W. J. Florence, the actor, had been badly injured by being thrown from his horse. We give the following from the dispatches: The Washington correspondent of a Western journal states that Gen. McClernand denies having endorsed the President's emancipation proclamat
with panderers to public favor. She must continue what she had been, the great conservative element in the nation. The communion service was conducted by Bishops Remper, of Wisconsin, De Laucey, of Western New York; Whittington of Maryland; Bishopric king of Vermont, and others. The large congregation participated in the communion. The right reverend clergy then returned to the House of Bishops, where they organized by electing the Rev. Dr. Creek, of Kentucky, president, and the Rev. Dr. Kendall, of Boston secretary. The Convention held its fourth daily session on Saturday. The attendance was large, and a question of the forms of the Rubric, and of special prayer in reference to the present national emergency led to protracted and animated debates.--The feature of the session was the address of Hon. Horatin Seymour candidate for the Governorship of New York, who while favoring a special form of prayer, adjured the Convention to deal gently with their absent brethren of t
in command at Louisville. The invader's scout for pickets are within twelve miles of the city. Our inner line of trenches is within the corporation limits, and crosses our once beautiful cemetery Many graves are torn up, and tomo-stones and monuments thrown down. The stern necessities and terrible realities of war surround and press upon us. The invader a Legislature meets to-day at Danville.--We are concerned about the safety of General G. W. Morgan's command. He abandoned the Gap on the 25th. The Journal to-day says the Government should proceed to draft at once for the balance, and then call for 400,000 more to be held in reserve. "A peace must be conquered. Prosecute this war with all energy and an activity which assume that it can only terminate by the utter annihilation of the rebel army, and the destruction of all its resource. " Compliment to McClellan. Gen. Halleck seems to be afraid that "Little Mac" don't exactly understand that he has on a victory, and
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