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lly misleading those who hear them, and betraying their country to its fall. The political meetings at the North. We continue our accounts of the political meetings at the North. Another Republican meeting was held in New York on the 21 instant, at which resolutions were adopted stigmatizing the Democratic State ticket as "the representative of treason at the North." The Star Spangled Banner, and a celebrated negro retrain called "Old Shandy," having been sung, Mr. Horace Greeley toooyed in Colt's armory were among the drafted soldiers in Hartford. The Government ordered their discharge from the military service, and sent them back to the armory. There were one hundred and seventeen deaths in New Orleans during the week ending on the 21st ult., and one of the persons deceased was one hundred and seventeen years old. Fifty-nine men are all that remain of the Second Wisconsin regiment, that left the Stole but little over a year ago nearly eleven hundred strong.
pbraid us for being slow, out she should remember the history of the Crimes They forget the battle of Alma, on September 14, and didn't capture Sebastopol until a year afterward, and after losing more men than they originally landed. We had fought better than the Allies in the Crimes, and should fight it out regardless of what Europe said [Applause.] Our first duty in sustaining the Government was to sustain its friends in the State canvass — the nominees of the Syracuse Convention on the 24th inst. He closed with an eulogy upon the American flag. After an address from Mr. Francis Lambert, the meeting adjourned. The difficulty with Gen. Sigel. The Washington Star announces officially that Gen. Sigel but requested to be relieved from his command. This man is, next to the leader of the German in the United States. with the failure to assign to his corps certain regiments recently raised which the Governors of the States in which they were raised promised to pen
September 27th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 1
en and Cumberland, were yesterday attacked by a rebel force and all taken prisoners. The dispatch adds: At the same time a cavalry force, under Colonel McReynolds. Captured the encampment of the rebels bringing away two pieces of artillery, ten wagons and sixty horses and mules. A strong cavalry force, under General Averill, has been sent after the retreating rebels. Gen. McClellan has sent the following letter to Gov. of Pa.: Hdq'rs Army of the Potomac,Sharpsburg, Sept. 27, 1862. Governor. --I beg to avail myself of a most the first I have had since the recent battles to tender to you my thanks for your wise and energetic action in calling out the militia of Pennsylvania for its defence, when threatened by a numerous and victorious army of the enemy. Fortunately circumstances rendered it impossible for the enemy to set foot upon the soil of Pennsylvania, but the moral support rendered to my army by your action was the less mighty. In the came of my arm
September 14th (search for this): article 1
er.] England stood ready to take any side of any question in order to injure this country. Mr. Roebuck stated the true reason of this feeling when he said that it was jealousy of our growing power; and in that statement Mr. Mosburk fully represented the British people. All we asked was for Europe to let us alone, and we would take care that Europe did let us alone England might upbraid us for being slow, out she should remember the history of the Crimes They forget the battle of Alma, on September 14, and didn't capture Sebastopol until a year afterward, and after losing more men than they originally landed. We had fought better than the Allies in the Crimes, and should fight it out regardless of what Europe said [Applause.] Our first duty in sustaining the Government was to sustain its friends in the State canvass — the nominees of the Syracuse Convention on the 24th inst. He closed with an eulogy upon the American flag. After an address from Mr. Francis Lambert, the meeting a
September 30th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 1
r the balance, and then call for 400,000 more to be held in reserve. "A peace must be conquered. Prosecute this war with all energy and an activity which assume that it can only terminate by the utter annihilation of the rebel army, and the destruction of all its resource. " Compliment to McClellan. Gen. Halleck seems to be afraid that "Little Mac" don't exactly understand that he has on a victory, and writes him the following assurance of the fact: Washington, D. C., Sept. 30, 1862. Maj. Gen. McClellan, Commanding, &c.: General: Your report of yesterday, giving the results of the battles of South Mountain and Antitain, has been received and submitted to the President. They were not only hard fought battles, but well-earned and decided victories. The valor and endurance of your army in the several conflicts which terminated in the expulsion of the enemy from the loyal State of Maryland, are creditable alike to the troops and to the officers who commanded
Perhaps the President waited longer than he should, [laughter,] but that very hesitancy gave the measure finally its fullest force. He did not believe there was one man in the Cabinet who did not think that, if we put down the rebellion, we must put down slavery. There never was a moment since the war began when there was not a tendency to give the contest this aspect. He had the utmost confidence in our success. The rebels had exhausted the goods they bought of the New York merchants in 1860 and cheated them out of in 1861. [Laughter.] He did not believe the rebels were getting many supplies from Europe, for they were bad paymasters at best, and this was not their best time [Laughter and applause.] He believed that by next spring we should be a united, free and happy people. [Applause.] He believed that the South would try and patch up a peace before January. The English, who saw nothing but defeat for us, forgot that we were reinforcing the Army of the Potomac with 600,0
nger than he should, [laughter,] but that very hesitancy gave the measure finally its fullest force. He did not believe there was one man in the Cabinet who did not think that, if we put down the rebellion, we must put down slavery. There never was a moment since the war began when there was not a tendency to give the contest this aspect. He had the utmost confidence in our success. The rebels had exhausted the goods they bought of the New York merchants in 1860 and cheated them out of in 1861. [Laughter.] He did not believe the rebels were getting many supplies from Europe, for they were bad paymasters at best, and this was not their best time [Laughter and applause.] He believed that by next spring we should be a united, free and happy people. [Applause.] He believed that the South would try and patch up a peace before January. The English, who saw nothing but defeat for us, forgot that we were reinforcing the Army of the Potomac with 600,000 men. Our army was stronger th
ain unfilled. Most of the young men of this region are now serving in the rebel army. Geo. D. Spencer, an officer of the Criminal Court of this district, was to- day by order of Chief Detective Baker, on the charge of disloyalty. In conversation he endorsed the action of the rebel Government in raising the black flag, and said it should have been done long ago. He will be sent to the Old Capitol prison. Exchange of prisoners — Affairs at Suffolk A letter dated Norfolk, the 3d inst., says Lieut. Col. has been entrusted with the arrangement of the exchange and that "the next of the Commissioners will prove very important." my is known to have massed considerable force at but the indications are that he is there more to dispute any advance from our side than to make any demonstration upon our position. The fact seems to be that the rebels are terribly scared in this quarter, but are resorting to the old Manassas game of holding a superior force in check by m
an then retreated toward the river, burning thirty on his way. Last night Morgan Meanwhile Col. went and brought up 300 of the 117th A dispatch Louisville says the Confederate, had evacuated Baldstown, Ky., on the evening of the 4th instant, and it was shortly after by the Federal of corps. The dispatch, which is dated the 5th, says: A has been prevalent here that General was attached by Kirby Smith a rebel force, at to-day, and driven This last is entirely dis ere till the power passes forever out of their hands and they awake to the reality of their political condition is lost. Return of Lincoln to Washington — his speeches in Maryland. Lincoln returned to Washington on the evening of the 4th inst., and immediately held a closet interview with his Secretary of War, and afterwards with the rest of his Cabinet, from which conferences the New York papers say the "most important and great movements are to result." It is said that he is perfec
ad the utmost confidence in our success. The rebels had exhausted the goods they bought of the New York merchants in 1860 and cheated them out of in 1861. [Laughter.] He did not believe the rebels were getting many supplies from Europe, for they were bad paymasters at best, and this was not their best time [Laughter and applause.] He believed that by next spring we should be a united, free and happy people. [Applause.] He believed that the South would try and patch up a peace before January. The English, who saw nothing but defeat for us, forgot that we were reinforcing the Army of the Potomac with 600,000 men. Our army was stronger than the rebels, in its intelligence and its capacity. [Applause.] As to the President's proclamation, we heard predictions that the army wouldn't stand it — the officers would resign. He didn't see it. [Laughter.] Where was the man who had resigned? There were some whom he washed would resign, but didn't. The proclamation simplified the work o
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