hide Sorting

You can sort these results in two ways:

By entity
Chronological order for dates, alphabetical order for places and people.
By position (current method)
As the entities appear in the document.

You are currently sorting in ascending order. Sort in descending order.

hide Most Frequent Entities

The entities that appear most frequently in this document are shown below.

Entity Max. Freq Min. Freq
M. Vernay 68 0 Browse Search
United States (United States) 30 0 Browse Search
Danville (Virginia, United States) 23 3 Browse Search
Benjamin F. Butler 22 0 Browse Search
Lincoln 19 1 Browse Search
M. Wardes 16 0 Browse Search
House 12 0 Browse Search
W. S. Rosecrans 12 0 Browse Search
McClellan 10 2 Browse Search
U. S. Grant 10 0 Browse Search
View all entities in this document...

Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: October 11, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

Found 46 total hits in 5 results.

M. Wardes (search for this): article 6
e offices, took me over to the house. "My daughter, Mr. Wardes; Victorine, my dear, Mr. Wardes, a nephew of mine." Mr. Wardes, a nephew of mine." I looked at my cousin once and again — she was worth looking at — a most singular mixture of races was visible in her face.n I shall, I dare say, M. Vernay." "Let me hope not, M. Wardes; you are a young man yet — quite a young man." "That it," said Vernay. He did--520, 346. "Try that, M. Wardes. I do not make it correct; I make it more." I cast ystem, in the daily balance-book. " "It is 520 here, M. Wardes." He handed the book to my uncle. The door opened. ois, what is it?" "Only that I shall give this to Monsieur Wardes. I have found it in his chamber." He held out a r the other clerk and my uncle had gone, and said: "M. Wardes, we have been looking at the accounts of Madame la Marquiong gas-light, trying to read them. "Can I help you, M. Wardes?" "No, thank you, I've just done." I put up the<
M. Vernay (search for this): article 6
ined minds would require twelve for.--As for M. Vernay and his 'Systeme,' as he calls it, it is a goks I could prove fraud to be possible. M. Vernay started, turned pale, and turned on me a gla saw a face there was no mistaking — that of M. Vernay. --He was sitting at one of the little, roundly, in an under tone. "I tell you," said Vernay, "it will not do; you always have to ask me ben love with Victorine." "That is serious, Vernay — she was to be yours." "That may be yet., then?" "Yes. Where is the check?" Vernay drew from his pocket-book a blank check, filled not deliberately lie. No, my dear Charles, M. Vernay is an old and tried servant of mine, and I wond." "True." "Let me cast it," said Vernay. He did--520, 346. "Try that, M. War. I can prove it. I posted it, according to M. Vernay's system, in the daily balance-book. " key turn, and I was in black darkness. "M. Vernay! M. Vernay! the door is shut." "I know[24 more...]<
for dinner." At dinner I was introduced to the chief clerk, or rather, the manager of my uncle's business. Once or twice I noticed his eyes fix themselves on me in a way that gave me the idea of his measuring me. I felt annoyed at this, and I showed it a little, perhaps, in the tone of my voice as I answered his inquiries as to the practices of English commerce. "Oh!" said my uncle, "he knows nothing about the matter, Monsieur Vernay. Ask him to recite to you a chorus from the 'Antigone,' and he'll repeat half the book; but of commerce — of banking — he knows nothing." "We shall be able to teach him our system in a few years, if he shall stay so long with us." "He'll stay longer than I shall, I dare say, M. Vernay." "Let me hope not, M. Wardes; you are a young man yet — quite a young man." "That may be, but I don't mean to spend all my life in your dear Paris, M. Vernay. --Oh, no." "Whatever comes, we shall do our best with the young gentleman, to <
must dine with us at six o'clock.--Where did you sleep last night?" "At the Bedford." "You'd better bring your trunks here; your room is ready." "Really, I had no idea that I was to live here." "Where else, boy? Where else? Paris is not a cheap place for young men; you'll live here cheaper than anywhere else; more comfortably, perhaps, if you and Victorine don't quarrel." This was more than I had hoped for, to find myself domiciled in my uncle's house. I thought he if he shall stay so long with us." "He'll stay longer than I shall, I dare say, M. Vernay." "Let me hope not, M. Wardes; you are a young man yet — quite a young man." "That may be, but I don't mean to spend all my life in your dear Paris, M. Vernay. --Oh, no." "Whatever comes, we shall do our best with the young gentleman, to make him useful. " I felt angry and vexed at this conversation; though the hints thrown out by my uncle were plain enough, I did not like this con
he could not deliberately lie. No, my dear Charles, M. Vernay is an old and tried servant of mine, and I will not believe you. I will not insult him by it.--You were drunk, sir, very. Don't let me hear of it again." I went to my desk an hour afterward. M. Vernay came in with my uncle. "Charles, did you balance your cash last night?" "Yes, sir. I always do." "It was right?" "Quite right." "There's a mistake somewhere," said M. Vernay. "There is missing a sum of 1000 francs." "It can't be in my accounts, uncle; for here is the book, and here is the balance to correspond." "True." "Let me cast it," said Vernay. He did--520, 346. "Try that, M. Wardes. I do not make it correct; I make it more." I cast it again, and it was more by just 1,000 francs. I cast it again--521 it was. My uncle cast it--521 it was. "How is this, Charles? you said you made the balance right. Did you look at your cash last, night?" "I did. I