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South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 8
t, to blow themselves up, in a most extraordinary and heroic way. From the Secretary's Handiwork, as furnished by his imprudent friend, we cite as follows: "The Merrimac, the Manassas, the McRae, the Jackson, the Carondolet, the Blenville, the Pamlico, the Livingston, the Pontchartrain, the General Polk, the Red River, the Savannah, the Huntress, the Lady Davis, the Resolute, the Sampson. Also, five small gunboats, constructed at Charleston and Savannah, and five purchased from the State of South Carolina--the St. Nicholas, the Patrick Henry, the Jamestown, the Arkansas, the Missouri, the Mississippi,&c., &c. All this was an idle waste of money; yet it was natural that the Secretary should buy or build these useless vessels; but most wrong and unnatural that the teachers of the "Art of Murder Made Rasy." the non combatant outsiders, should abuse the Secretary for doing nothing, whilst he has been so assiduously engaged in their favorite plan of perpetrating homicide by new, easy
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
he Arkansas, the Missouri, the Mississippi,&c., &c. All this was an idle waste of money; yet it was natural that the Secretary should buy or build these useless vessels; but most wrong and unnatural that the teachers of the "Art of Murder Made Rasy." the non combatant outsiders, should abuse the Secretary for doing nothing, whilst he has been so assiduously engaged in their favorite plan of perpetrating homicide by new, easy, and cheap processes. Ever since the battles of Manassas and Bull Run they have been complaining that the war has not been ended by a "corp de main" by some short, simple, and expeditions procedure, and yet censure the Secretary, who has been busily at work trying to invent new and easy ways to victory. --Will they never find out that to organize, discipline, and mobilize large armies requires length of time and vast expenditure of money? Will they never discover that eight millions of men can conquer twenty millions only by the combination and exercise of g
Hungary (Hungary) (search for this): article 8
r twenty millions only by the combination and exercise of great skill, courage, caution, patience, and fortitude? The greatest stump orator that ever lived was Peter the Hermit. He turned General and set out for Asia and Jerusalem with three hundred thousand undisciplined troops, and without any plan of operations, just as our politicians, editors, and street longers would have had our undisciplined army set out for Washington after the battle of Manassas. He lost part of his army in Hungary and the balance in Asia. The next most conspicuous stump orator commander in chief that our knowledge of history enables us to cite is Abraham Lincoln. He took command of the United States forces last spring. They were then seven hundred thousand strong. We doubt if they number, now, more than three hundred thousand.--Old Abe Prince of the Satanic School of Stump Orators and unsurpassed at jokes and anecdotes, will boat Peter the Great, head of the Celestial School, and famous for praye
Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 8
owerful iron-clad vessels of their own. To be serious, this whole scheme of improvising a navy is as gross a piece of charlatanry as ever was played off upon a credulous and confiding people. It cost us New Orleans, and all the Mississippi valley, except Vicksburg; it cost us Nashville and a great part of Tennessee and Kentucky, and would have cost us Richmond, but for the fortunate blowing up of the Merrimac. After that, we went seriously to work in obstructing and fortifying, the James river, and thus saved our capital, by the sacrifice of our favorite ram. Now, that most of the lams are at the bottom of the sea, or of the Mississippi, we begin to breathe freely, and to hope that, no longer confiding in such humbugs, we shall go about building forts, which will afford real protection and security to most of our rivers and harbors. Bonaparte, when England had destroyed his navy, had too much good sense to begin building up another. We suspect that the verdant young gentl
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 8
d days, kill them all up by computation." Of course the enemy would be too honorable to double teams upon our iron clad rams, and would never think of building larger and more powerful iron-clad vessels of their own. To be serious, this whole scheme of improvising a navy is as gross a piece of charlatanry as ever was played off upon a credulous and confiding people. It cost us New Orleans, and all the Mississippi valley, except Vicksburg; it cost us Nashville and a great part of Tennessee and Kentucky, and would have cost us Richmond, but for the fortunate blowing up of the Merrimac. After that, we went seriously to work in obstructing and fortifying, the James river, and thus saved our capital, by the sacrifice of our favorite ram. Now, that most of the lams are at the bottom of the sea, or of the Mississippi, we begin to breathe freely, and to hope that, no longer confiding in such humbugs, we shall go about building forts, which will afford real protection and security
e fleet in detail, or as is vulgarly said. "she will bent bobtail." Now, we suspect that "bobtail" is a mere corruption of "Bobadil," and if so, the saying is quite classic. Our readers who are over fifty, and used to read, in early boyhood. "Scott's Lesson," no doubt have a vivid recollection of the valorous and redoubtable Captain Bobadil, and will probably agree with us. that this plan of whipping and destroying the whole Yankee fleet, in detail, with a few iron-clad rams, is stolon from the Captain, the Scene of action only being transferred from land to water. We can't find a copy of our friend and acquaintance, "Scott's Lesson," but by the help of a learned friend, who is curious in literary matters, we have hunted up the original and veritable Captain Bobadil, and found him ensconced in Ben. Johnson's comedy of "Every man to his own humor," Determined to vindicate originality and expose plagiarism, we will let the Captain speak for himself. "Bobadil.--I am a gentlema
no longer confiding in such humbugs, we shall go about building forts, which will afford real protection and security to most of our rivers and harbors. Bonaparte, when England had destroyed his navy, had too much good sense to begin building up another. We suspect that the verdant young gentlemen of the press, who are continually urging on the Administration and the army to some rash coup de main, in order to end the war at once, have been pouring over the fabulous feats of Orlando, Rinaldo, and the other Paladius of Charlemagne, and, like Don Quixote, have run stark staring crazy.--As for the stump crators, who are equally clamorous in their demands for an immediate action that shall wipe out the enemy at a single blow, they know better, and are merely talking for Buncombe We should as soon suspect a monkey or Connection Yankee of running mad as a stump orator. --They are like the dealers at fare, who are always trying to get others drunk, but never get drunk themselves.
and expose plagiarism, we will let the Captain speak for himself. "Bobadil.--I am a gentleman, and live here obscure and to myself; but were I known to Her Majesty and the Lords, observe me, I would undertake upon this forehead and life, for the public benefit of the State, not only to spare the entire lives of her subjects in general, but to save the one half, nay, three parts of her yearly charge in holding war, and against what enemy soever. And how would I do it, think you ? "Knowell.--Nay, I know not nor can I conceive. "Robadil.--Why, thus, sir. I would select nineteen more, to myself, throughout the land; gentlemen they should be of good spirit, strong and able constitutions. I would chose them, sir, by an instinct, a character that I have, and I would teach those nine teen the special rules, as your punto, your reverse, your toccata, your imbroccata, your passado, your montanto, till they could all play, very near or altogether, as well as myself. This done —
Bonaparte (search for this): article 8
s Richmond, but for the fortunate blowing up of the Merrimac. After that, we went seriously to work in obstructing and fortifying, the James river, and thus saved our capital, by the sacrifice of our favorite ram. Now, that most of the lams are at the bottom of the sea, or of the Mississippi, we begin to breathe freely, and to hope that, no longer confiding in such humbugs, we shall go about building forts, which will afford real protection and security to most of our rivers and harbors. Bonaparte, when England had destroyed his navy, had too much good sense to begin building up another. We suspect that the verdant young gentlemen of the press, who are continually urging on the Administration and the army to some rash coup de main, in order to end the war at once, have been pouring over the fabulous feats of Orlando, Rinaldo, and the other Paladius of Charlemagne, and, like Don Quixote, have run stark staring crazy.--As for the stump crators, who are equally clamorous in their
Abraham Lincoln (search for this): article 8
t ever lived was Peter the Hermit. He turned General and set out for Asia and Jerusalem with three hundred thousand undisciplined troops, and without any plan of operations, just as our politicians, editors, and street longers would have had our undisciplined army set out for Washington after the battle of Manassas. He lost part of his army in Hungary and the balance in Asia. The next most conspicuous stump orator commander in chief that our knowledge of history enables us to cite is Abraham Lincoln. He took command of the United States forces last spring. They were then seven hundred thousand strong. We doubt if they number, now, more than three hundred thousand.--Old Abe Prince of the Satanic School of Stump Orators and unsurpassed at jokes and anecdotes, will boat Peter the Great, head of the Celestial School, and famous for prayer and preaching, at least one hundred thousand in the useless sacrifice of human life. War is not easy work, nor a simple process. It requires for
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