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the confidence of all Nor has he a single officer about him capable of bettering us. Sumner is a "bull in a china shop," and a sure enough blunderer.--lost his corps gratuitously at Fair Oaks. He is not now in his right place, and will be much worse. --is a small brain, ossified in a "4 company" garrison on the frontier. He was not "of us" in Mexico, but in a rear column once saw a distant flash in a guerrilla fight. His skill is a myth — a political version of his own part at Bull Run. Porter is good in nature, but weak as water — the parent of all the disaster for his want of generalship on the Chickahominy.--and Franklin are talented engineers. They might make good Generals if they understood the value of elements in their calculations; as it is, they are dangerous failures. When — was drunk, he had some few men drowned before Yorktown. I know of no other feat of his. Franklin's battle of West Point was a most runaway picket fight of ours. His part on the Chickahominy <
of Van Dorn's. From there I would make a forced march to Fort Pillow, which I would take with probably only a very small loss. It is evident the forces at Memphis and Yazoo river would then have their line of communication by the river with the North cut off, and they would have either to surrender or cross without resources into Arkansas, where Gen. Holmes would take good care of them. From Fort Pillow I would compel the forces at Corinth and Jackson, Tenn., to fall back precipitately to Humboldt and Columbus, or their lines of communication would be cut off also. We would then pursue them vigorously beyond the Mississippi at Columbus, or the Ohio at Paducah. We would thus compel the enemy to evacuate the State of Mississippi and Western Tennessee, with probably the loss on our part of a few hundred men. General Price could then be detached into Missouri to support his friends, where his presence alone would be worth an army to the Confederacy. The armament and ammunition
ssissippi river for these purposes. I would concentrate rapidly at Grand Junction Price's army, and all that could be spared from Vicksburg of Van Dorn's. From there I would make a forced march to Fort Pillow, which I would take with probably only a very small loss. It is evident the forces at Memphis and Yazoo river would then have their line of communication by the river with the North cut off, and they would have either to surrender or cross without resources into Arkansas, where Gen. Holmes would take good care of them. From Fort Pillow I would compel the forces at Corinth and Jackson, Tenn., to fall back precipitately to Humboldt and Columbus, or their lines of communication would be cut off also. We would then pursue them vigorously beyond the Mississippi at Columbus, or the Ohio at Paducah. We would thus compel the enemy to evacuate the State of Mississippi and Western Tennessee, with probably the loss on our part of a few hundred men. General Price could then be d
O. S. Halstead (search for this): article 7
e late General Kearny on M'Clellan. Wilkes's (N. Y.) Spirit of the Times, of last week, publishes the following letter of Major General Philip Kearny to O. S. Halstead, Jr., of Newark N. J., which has been made the subject of much comment: Harrison's Landing, 4th August, 1862. Dear Pet: I thank you for your kind, land Kentucky will cast past victories to the winds and rise with their nearly allied rebel kin. My dear Pet, I shall be delighted when Henry can come on. As to Col. Halstead, I think that his case is a type of the insane and unnecessary despotism introduced into the army, under the auspices of McClellan and his very weak aids. It lvern Hill. He went out four miles and came back again. Still, a "false fuss" injures the whole army. McClellan is dangerous, from the want of digesting his plans. He positively has no talents. Adieu. Get me and my "fighting division" with Pope. With best regards, yours, Kearny. To Mr. O. S. Halstead, Jr., Newark, N. J.
G. W. Morgan (search for this): article 7
ment you get to Chattanooga you ought to take the offensive, keeping in mind the following grand principles of the art of war: First, always bring the masses of your army in contact with the fractions of the enemy; second, operate as much as possible on his communications without exposing your own; third, operate always on interior or shorter lines. I have no doubt that, with anything like equal numbers, you will always meet with success. I am happy to see that my two Lieutenants, Morgan and Forrest, are doing such good service in Kentucky and Tennessee. When I appointed them I thought they would leave their mark wherever they passed. By the by, I think we ought hereafter, in our official papers, to call the "Yankees" "Abolitionists" instead of "Federal," for they now proclaim not only the abolition of slavery, but of all our constitutional rights; and that name will have a stinging effect on our Western enemies. I intend to issue a general order on the subject when
M'Clellan (search for this): article 7
fter, in our official papers, to call the "Yankees" "Abolitionists" instead of "Federal," for they now proclaim not only the abolition of slavery, but of all our constitutional rights; and that name will have a stinging effect on our Western enemies. I intend to issue a general order on the subject whenever I assume a command. Sincerely your friend, G. T. Beauregard. Gen. Braxton Bragg, commanding Department No. 2, Mobile, Ala. The Famous Criticism of the late General Kearny on M'Clellan. Wilkes's (N. Y.) Spirit of the Times, of last week, publishes the following letter of Major General Philip Kearny to O. S. Halstead, Jr., of Newark N. J., which has been made the subject of much comment: Harrison's Landing, 4th August, 1862. Dear Pet: I thank you for your kind, long letter. You extend to me hope. You suggest withdrawing me and my division out of this ignoble position. With Pope's army, I would breathe again. We have no Generals McClellan is the fa
rmed, at Covington. Now for the operation in Western Tennessee.--The object there should be to drive the enemy from there, and resume the command of the Mississippi river for these purposes. I would concentrate rapidly at Grand Junction Price's army, and all that could be spared from Vicksburg of Van Dorn's. From there I would make a forced march to Fort Pillow, which I would take with probably only a very small loss. It is evident the forces at Memphis and Yazoo river would then havd then pursue them vigorously beyond the Mississippi at Columbus, or the Ohio at Paducah. We would thus compel the enemy to evacuate the State of Mississippi and Western Tennessee, with probably the loss on our part of a few hundred men. General Price could then be detached into Missouri to support his friends, where his presence alone would be worth an army to the Confederacy. The armament and ammunition of the works referred to to be collected as soon as possible at Meridian and Cha
t willing to be their puppet. My dear Pet, I am too lazy, and too little interested, to dive into the future of this "little box of heresies." so do tell me — what do the people at the North look forward to in the future ? I fear lest the war will die out in rapid imbecility. For McClellan, he is burnt out. Never once on a battle-field, you have nothing to hope from him as a leader of a column. How do they expect Pope to beat, with a very inferior force, the veterans of Ewell and Jackson ? But these are episodes. We deceive ourselves. There was a people of old — it was the warrior Spartan, with his Helot of the field. The South have realized it. There was an ambitious people of recent times, and a conscription pandered to bet invasions. At this moment the South exemplifies them both. "Peace, peace," but there is no peace. No, not even with a disruptured Union. Let the North cast away that delusion. Draft we must, or the disciplined thousands of the South will re
or your kind, long letter. You extend to me hope. You suggest withdrawing me and my division out of this ignoble position. With Pope's army, I would breathe again. We have no Generals McClellan is the failure I ever proclaimed him. He has been punished, just as I at once comprehended the moves of the portion. He will only get us in more jollies, more waste of blood, fighting by driblets. He has loss the confidence of all Nor has he a single officer about him capable of bettering us. Sumner is a "bull in a china shop," and a sure enough blunderer.--lost his corps gratuitously at Fair Oaks. He is not now in his right place, and will be much worse. --is a small brain, ossified in a "4 company" garrison on the frontier. He was not "of us" in Mexico, but in a rear column once saw a distant flash in a guerrilla fight. His skill is a myth — a political version of his own part at Bull Run. Porter is good in nature, but weak as water — the parent of all the disaster for his want of
official papers, to call the "Yankees" "Abolitionists" instead of "Federal," for they now proclaim not only the abolition of slavery, but of all our constitutional rights; and that name will have a stinging effect on our Western enemies. I intend to issue a general order on the subject whenever I assume a command. Sincerely your friend, G. T. Beauregard. Gen. Braxton Bragg, commanding Department No. 2, Mobile, Ala. The Famous Criticism of the late General Kearny on M'Clellan. Wilkes's (N. Y.) Spirit of the Times, of last week, publishes the following letter of Major General Philip Kearny to O. S. Halstead, Jr., of Newark N. J., which has been made the subject of much comment: Harrison's Landing, 4th August, 1862. Dear Pet: I thank you for your kind, long letter. You extend to me hope. You suggest withdrawing me and my division out of this ignoble position. With Pope's army, I would breathe again. We have no Generals McClellan is the failure I ever p
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