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Further from the North. We continue our extracts from Northern papers of the 17th inst.: Captured Confederate letters — Beauregard's plans for the Western Campaign. The following letters were captured some time ago by Gen. Buell while in process of transmission for file to Brigadier-General Thomas Jordan, Assistant Adjutant-General of the Confederate army: General Beauregard to Adjutant General Cooper.[Confidential] Mobile, Ala., Sept. 5, 1862. General: Under the supposition that on the restoration of my health I would be returned to the command of Department No. 2, I had prepared, whilst at Bladin, Alabama, a plan of operations in Tennessee and Kentucky, based on my knowledge of that part of the theatre of war; but hearing that my just expectations are to be disappointed. I have the honor to communicate it to the War Department, in the hope that it may be of service to our arms and to our cause. It was submitted by me to Gen. Bragg on the 2d inst. By
McClellan (search for this): article 7
t of this ignoble position. With Pope's army, I would breathe again. We have no Generals McClellan is the failure I ever proclaimed him. He has been punished, just as I at once comprehended theI, on the heels of Bull Run, faced the enemy with a Jersey brigade, in advance of all others — McClellan, McDowell, et id omne genus, nearly forcing me to come back of the "Seminary." Do they forgetlook forward to in the future ? I fear lest the war will die out in rapid imbecility. For McClellan, he is burnt out. Never once on a battle-field, you have nothing to hope from him as a leader a type of the insane and unnecessary despotism introduced into the army, under the auspices of McClellan and his very weak aids. It is now too late; but why was not the cavalry put in my charge at t He went out four miles and came back again. Still, a "false fuss" injures the whole army. McClellan is dangerous, from the want of digesting his plans. He positively has no talents. Adieu. Get
ept it, and quickly, to a man, or the moment it draggles in debate, Maryland, Tennessee, and Kentucky will cast past victories to the winds and rise with their nearly allied rebel kin. My dear Pet, I shall be delighted when Henry can come on. As to Col. Halstead, I think that his case is a type of the insane and unnecessary despotism introduced into the army, under the auspices of McClellan and his very weak aids. It is now too late; but why was not the cavalry put in my charge at the commencement ? Two nights ago the rebel batteries fired from across the river, and killed and wounded some thirty men. Last night Hooker started out on a crude expedition to Malvern Hill. He went out four miles and came back again. Still, a "false fuss" injures the whole army. McClellan is dangerous, from the want of digesting his plans. He positively has no talents. Adieu. Get me and my "fighting division" with Pope. With best regards, yours, Kearny. To Mr. O. S. Halstead, Jr., Newark, N. J.
,"" I am not willing to be their puppet. My dear Pet, I am too lazy, and too little interested, to dive into the future of this "little box of heresies." so do tell me — what do the people at the North look forward to in the future ? I fear lest the war will die out in rapid imbecility. For McClellan, he is burnt out. Never once on a battle-field, you have nothing to hope from him as a leader of a column. How do they expect Pope to beat, with a very inferior force, the veterans of Ewell and Jackson ? But these are episodes. We deceive ourselves. There was a people of old — it was the warrior Spartan, with his Helot of the field. The South have realized it. There was an ambitious people of recent times, and a conscription pandered to bet invasions. At this moment the South exemplifies them both. "Peace, peace," but there is no peace. No, not even with a disruptured Union. Let the North cast away that delusion. Draft we must, or the disciplined thousands of the So
would be marching to Cincinnati; but if we could get boats enough it would be shorter to go up the Ohio in them. To keep the command of Cincinnati would construct a strong work, heavily armed, at Covington. Now for the operation in Western Tennessee.--The object there should be to drive the enemy from there, and resume the command of the Mississippi river for these purposes. I would concentrate rapidly at Grand Junction Price's army, and all that could be spared from Vicksburg of Van Dorn's. From there I would make a forced march to Fort Pillow, which I would take with probably only a very small loss. It is evident the forces at Memphis and Yazoo river would then have their line of communication by the river with the North cut off, and they would have either to surrender or cross without resources into Arkansas, where Gen. Holmes would take good care of them. From Fort Pillow I would compel the forces at Corinth and Jackson, Tenn., to fall back precipitately to Humboldt an
Gen Buell (search for this): article 7
ard's plans for the Western Campaign. The following letters were captured some time ago by Gen. Buell while in process of transmission for file to Brigadier-General Thomas Jordan, Assistant Adjutat must be, first Louisville, and then Cincinnati. How best to reach them from Chattanooga, with Buell at Huntsville and Stevenson, is the question. It is evident he has the advantage of two bases od evidently but one of four things to do: First, to attack Halleck at Corinth; second, to attack Buell at or about Chattanooga; third, to attack Grant at or about Memphis; fourth, to remain idle at T evident that unless you reinforce General E. K., Smith at Chattanooga he will be overpowered by Buell, and then our communication with the East and our supplies at Atlanta, Augusta, &c., will be cutond one, if the newspapers will permit you to carry it successfully into effect, for Halleck and Buell occupying the base of a long isosceles triangle, of which Mobile is the apex, could get to Chatt
agg's assistance, collected together and organized, and which I had only left to recover my shattered health while my presence could be spared from it, and until he informed me that it was ready to take the offensive. Hoping for its entire success, I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, G. T. Beauregard, General, C. S. A. General Beauregard to General Braxton Bragg.[Confidential.] Collum Springs, Bladin, Ala., July 28, 1862. My Dear General: Your letter of the 22d inst., was only received last night. I give you with pleasure the following views on your proposed operations from Tupelo, for I wish you the amplest success, both on your and the country's account. You had evidently but one of four things to do: First, to attack Halleck at Corinth; second, to attack Buell at or about Chattanooga; third, to attack Grant at or about Memphis; fourth, to remain idle at Tupelo. From what you state the first is evidently inadmissible and the last cannot be
September 5th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 7
Further from the North. We continue our extracts from Northern papers of the 17th inst.: Captured Confederate letters — Beauregard's plans for the Western Campaign. The following letters were captured some time ago by Gen. Buell while in process of transmission for file to Brigadier-General Thomas Jordan, Assistant Adjutant-General of the Confederate army: General Beauregard to Adjutant General Cooper.[Confidential] Mobile, Ala., Sept. 5, 1862. General: Under the supposition that on the restoration of my health I would be returned to the command of Department No. 2, I had prepared, whilst at Bladin, Alabama, a plan of operations in Tennessee and Kentucky, based on my knowledge of that part of the theatre of war; but hearing that my just expectations are to be disappointed. I have the honor to communicate it to the War Department, in the hope that it may be of service to our arms and to our cause. It was submitted by me to Gen. Bragg on the 2d inst. By l
der the supposition that on the restoration of my health I would be returned to the command of Department No. 2, I had prepared, whilst at Bladin, Alabama, a plan of operations in Tennessee and Kentucky, based on my knowledge of that part of the theatre of war; but hearing that my just expectations are to be disappointed. I have the honor to communicate it to the War Department, in the hope that it may be of service to our arms and to our cause. It was submitted by me to Gen. Bragg on the 2d inst. By looking at the map it will be seen that the forces operating in that section of country will be separated at first by one river, (the Tennessee,) and afterwards by two, (the Tennessee and Cumberland.) hence they will be unable to support each other, being unprovided with pontoon trains; but their operations must be more or less dependent on or connected with each other. I will first refer to those in East Tennessee, and then to those west of it. In the first case, our objectiv
July 28th, 1862 AD (search for this): article 7
k to the command of that army which I had, with Gen. Bragg's assistance, collected together and organized, and which I had only left to recover my shattered health while my presence could be spared from it, and until he informed me that it was ready to take the offensive. Hoping for its entire success, I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, G. T. Beauregard, General, C. S. A. General Beauregard to General Braxton Bragg.[Confidential.] Collum Springs, Bladin, Ala., July 28, 1862. My Dear General: Your letter of the 22d inst., was only received last night. I give you with pleasure the following views on your proposed operations from Tupelo, for I wish you the amplest success, both on your and the country's account. You had evidently but one of four things to do: First, to attack Halleck at Corinth; second, to attack Buell at or about Chattanooga; third, to attack Grant at or about Memphis; fourth, to remain idle at Tupelo. From what you state the
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