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Maryland (Maryland, United States) (search for this): article 7
e field. The South have realized it. There was an ambitious people of recent times, and a conscription pandered to bet invasions. At this moment the South exemplifies them both. "Peace, peace," but there is no peace. No, not even with a disruptured Union. Let the North cast away that delusion. Draft we must, or the disciplined thousands of the South will redeem scrip in Philadelphia, and yet the true North must accept it, and quickly, to a man, or the moment it draggles in debate, Maryland, Tennessee, and Kentucky will cast past victories to the winds and rise with their nearly allied rebel kin. My dear Pet, I shall be delighted when Henry can come on. As to Col. Halstead, I think that his case is a type of the insane and unnecessary despotism introduced into the army, under the auspices of McClellan and his very weak aids. It is now too late; but why was not the cavalry put in my charge at the commencement ? Two nights ago the rebel batteries fired from across the river, an
Yazoo River (United States) (search for this): article 7
trong work, heavily armed, at Covington. Now for the operation in Western Tennessee.--The object there should be to drive the enemy from there, and resume the command of the Mississippi river for these purposes. I would concentrate rapidly at Grand Junction Price's army, and all that could be spared from Vicksburg of Van Dorn's. From there I would make a forced march to Fort Pillow, which I would take with probably only a very small loss. It is evident the forces at Memphis and Yazoo river would then have their line of communication by the river with the North cut off, and they would have either to surrender or cross without resources into Arkansas, where Gen. Holmes would take good care of them. From Fort Pillow I would compel the forces at Corinth and Jackson, Tenn., to fall back precipitately to Humboldt and Columbus, or their lines of communication would be cut off also. We would then pursue them vigorously beyond the Mississippi at Columbus, or the Ohio at Paducah.
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 7
had prepared, whilst at Bladin, Alabama, a plan of operations in Tennessee and Kentucky, based on my knowledge of that part of the theatre on or connected with each other. I will first refer to those in East Tennessee, and then to those west of it. In the first case, our objee will have to concentrate enough of our forces from Middle and East Tennessee to follow him rapidly and defeat him in a great battle, when wek, heavily armed, at Covington. Now for the operation in Western Tennessee.--The object there should be to drive the enemy from there, ahus compel the enemy to evacuate the State of Mississippi and Western Tennessee, with probably the loss on our part of a few hundred men. Gen, Morgan and Forrest, are doing such good service in Kentucky and Tennessee. When I appointed them I thought they would leave their mark whequickly, to a man, or the moment it draggles in debate, Maryland, Tennessee, and Kentucky will cast past victories to the winds and rise with
Fort Donelson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 7
d East Tennessee to follow him rapidly and defeat him in a great battle, when we would be able to resume our march as before indicated. We must, however, as soon as practicable, construct strong works to command the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers, for otherwise our communication would be cut off by the enemy as soon as these two rivers shall have risen sufficiently to admit the entrance of their gunboats and transports. The best positions for said works are about forty miles below Forts Donelson and Henry, not far from Eddysville, where those two rivers come within one and a half miles of each other. I am informed there is at that point a commanding elevation, where a strong field work could be constructed for a garrison of about twenty five hundred or three throusand men, when could hold out (with ample provisions and ammunition) against a large armay. Under the guns of this work and along the bank of each river a series of batteries armed with the heaviest guns (eight, nine,
Tennessee River (United States) (search for this): article 7
tive point must be, first Louisville, and then Cincinnati. How best to reach them from Chattanooga, with Buell at Huntsville and Stevenson, is the question. It is evident he has the advantage of two bases of operations — the Cumberland and Tennessee rivers — and that if we advance towards our objective points without getting rid of him we would expose our lines of communication with Chattanooga. We must then give him battle first, or compel him to retire before us. Should he retire on Naof our forces from Middle and East Tennessee to follow him rapidly and defeat him in a great battle, when we would be able to resume our march as before indicated. We must, however, as soon as practicable, construct strong works to command the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers, for otherwise our communication would be cut off by the enemy as soon as these two rivers shall have risen sufficiently to admit the entrance of their gunboats and transports. The best positions for said works are ab
Malvern Hill (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 7
ept it, and quickly, to a man, or the moment it draggles in debate, Maryland, Tennessee, and Kentucky will cast past victories to the winds and rise with their nearly allied rebel kin. My dear Pet, I shall be delighted when Henry can come on. As to Col. Halstead, I think that his case is a type of the insane and unnecessary despotism introduced into the army, under the auspices of McClellan and his very weak aids. It is now too late; but why was not the cavalry put in my charge at the commencement ? Two nights ago the rebel batteries fired from across the river, and killed and wounded some thirty men. Last night Hooker started out on a crude expedition to Malvern Hill. He went out four miles and came back again. Still, a "false fuss" injures the whole army. McClellan is dangerous, from the want of digesting his plans. He positively has no talents. Adieu. Get me and my "fighting division" with Pope. With best regards, yours, Kearny. To Mr. O. S. Halstead, Jr., Newark, N. J.
New Jersey (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): article 7
ur constitutional rights; and that name will have a stinging effect on our Western enemies. I intend to issue a general order on the subject whenever I assume a command. Sincerely your friend, G. T. Beauregard. Gen. Braxton Bragg, commanding Department No. 2, Mobile, Ala. The Famous Criticism of the late General Kearny on M'Clellan. Wilkes's (N. Y.) Spirit of the Times, of last week, publishes the following letter of Major General Philip Kearny to O. S. Halstead, Jr., of Newark N. J., which has been made the subject of much comment: Harrison's Landing, 4th August, 1862. Dear Pet: I thank you for your kind, long letter. You extend to me hope. You suggest withdrawing me and my division out of this ignoble position. With Pope's army, I would breathe again. We have no Generals McClellan is the failure I ever proclaimed him. He has been punished, just as I at once comprehended the moves of the portion. He will only get us in more jollies, more waste of b
Milford (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): article 7
ing Department No. 2, Mobile, Ala. The Famous Criticism of the late General Kearny on M'Clellan. Wilkes's (N. Y.) Spirit of the Times, of last week, publishes the following letter of Major General Philip Kearny to O. S. Halstead, Jr., of Newark N. J., which has been made the subject of much comment: Harrison's Landing, 4th August, 1862. Dear Pet: I thank you for your kind, long letter. You extend to me hope. You suggest withdrawing me and my division out of this ignoble pnt ? Two nights ago the rebel batteries fired from across the river, and killed and wounded some thirty men. Last night Hooker started out on a crude expedition to Malvern Hill. He went out four miles and came back again. Still, a "false fuss" injures the whole army. McClellan is dangerous, from the want of digesting his plans. He positively has no talents. Adieu. Get me and my "fighting division" with Pope. With best regards, yours, Kearny. To Mr. O. S. Halstead, Jr., Newark, N. J.
Jackson (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 7
nd all that could be spared from Vicksburg of Van Dorn's. From there I would make a forced march to Fort Pillow, which I would take with probably only a very small loss. It is evident the forces at Memphis and Yazoo river would then have their line of communication by the river with the North cut off, and they would have either to surrender or cross without resources into Arkansas, where Gen. Holmes would take good care of them. From Fort Pillow I would compel the forces at Corinth and Jackson, Tenn., to fall back precipitately to Humboldt and Columbus, or their lines of communication would be cut off also. We would then pursue them vigorously beyond the Mississippi at Columbus, or the Ohio at Paducah. We would thus compel the enemy to evacuate the State of Mississippi and Western Tennessee, with probably the loss on our part of a few hundred men. General Price could then be detached into Missouri to support his friends, where his presence alone would be worth an army to the Co
Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 7
ir mark wherever they passed. By the by, I think we ought hereafter, in our official papers, to call the "Yankees" "Abolitionists" instead of "Federal," for they now proclaim not only the abolition of slavery, but of all our constitutional rights; and that name will have a stinging effect on our Western enemies. I intend to issue a general order on the subject whenever I assume a command. Sincerely your friend, G. T. Beauregard. Gen. Braxton Bragg, commanding Department No. 2, Mobile, Ala. The Famous Criticism of the late General Kearny on M'Clellan. Wilkes's (N. Y.) Spirit of the Times, of last week, publishes the following letter of Major General Philip Kearny to O. S. Halstead, Jr., of Newark N. J., which has been made the subject of much comment: Harrison's Landing, 4th August, 1862. Dear Pet: I thank you for your kind, long letter. You extend to me hope. You suggest withdrawing me and my division out of this ignoble position. With Pope's army,
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