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Covington (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 7
er as soon as possible, so completely that future travelers would hardly know where it was. This I would do as a return for the Yankee vandalism in attempting to obstruct forever the harbors of Charleston and Savannah. A detachment of our army could, I think, take Louisville, while the main body would be marching to Cincinnati; but if we could get boats enough it would be shorter to go up the Ohio in them. To keep the command of Cincinnati would construct a strong work, heavily armed, at Covington. Now for the operation in Western Tennessee.--The object there should be to drive the enemy from there, and resume the command of the Mississippi river for these purposes. I would concentrate rapidly at Grand Junction Price's army, and all that could be spared from Vicksburg of Van Dorn's. From there I would make a forced march to Fort Pillow, which I would take with probably only a very small loss. It is evident the forces at Memphis and Yazoo river would then have their line o
Cumberland River (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 7
d he retire on Nashville (as the newspapers say he is now doing) we will be advancing towards Louisville; but should he venture on Florence or Savannah to unite his forces with Resecrans or Grant, we will have to concentrate enough of our forces from Middle and East Tennessee to follow him rapidly and defeat him in a great battle, when we would be able to resume our march as before indicated. We must, however, as soon as practicable, construct strong works to command the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers, for otherwise our communication would be cut off by the enemy as soon as these two rivers shall have risen sufficiently to admit the entrance of their gunboats and transports. The best positions for said works are about forty miles below Forts Donelson and Henry, not far from Eddysville, where those two rivers come within one and a half miles of each other. I am informed there is at that point a commanding elevation, where a strong field work could be constructed for a garrison
Huntsville (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 7
d at first by one river, (the Tennessee,) and afterwards by two, (the Tennessee and Cumberland.) hence they will be unable to support each other, being unprovided with pontoon trains; but their operations must be more or less dependent on or connected with each other. I will first refer to those in East Tennessee, and then to those west of it. In the first case, our objective point must be, first Louisville, and then Cincinnati. How best to reach them from Chattanooga, with Buell at Huntsville and Stevenson, is the question. It is evident he has the advantage of two bases of operations — the Cumberland and Tennessee rivers — and that if we advance towards our objective points without getting rid of him we would expose our lines of communication with Chattanooga. We must then give him battle first, or compel him to retire before us. Should he retire on Nashville (as the newspapers say he is now doing) we will be advancing towards Louisville; but should he venture on Floren
Mississippi (United States) (search for this): article 7
pting to obstruct forever the harbors of Charleston and Savannah. A detachment of our army could, I think, take Louisville, while the main body would be marching to Cincinnati; but if we could get boats enough it would be shorter to go up the Ohio in them. To keep the command of Cincinnati would construct a strong work, heavily armed, at Covington. Now for the operation in Western Tennessee.--The object there should be to drive the enemy from there, and resume the command of the Mississippi river for these purposes. I would concentrate rapidly at Grand Junction Price's army, and all that could be spared from Vicksburg of Van Dorn's. From there I would make a forced march to Fort Pillow, which I would take with probably only a very small loss. It is evident the forces at Memphis and Yazoo river would then have their line of communication by the river with the North cut off, and they would have either to surrender or cross without resources into Arkansas, where Gen. Holmes
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 7
much worse. --is a small brain, ossified in a "4 company" garrison on the frontier. He was not "of us" in Mexico, but in a rear column once saw a distant flash in a guerrilla fight. His skill is a myth — a political version of his own part at Bull Run. Porter is good in nature, but weak as water — the parent of all the disaster for his want of generalship on the Chickahominy.--and Franklin are talented engineers. They might make good Generals if they understood the value of elements in theBesides, they have sent me a Major-Generalship, like all these others, dating from 4th July, muddled in a batch of new and very ordinary junior officers. Do they forget that I was appointed twelfth on the original list ? That I, on the heels of Bull Run, faced the enemy with a Jersey brigade, in advance of all others — McClellan, McDowell, et id omne genus, nearly forcing me to come back of the "Seminary." Do they forget me at Manassas ?--My Jersey brigade, that infected with panic the retirin<
Mississippi (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 7
er with the North cut off, and they would have either to surrender or cross without resources into Arkansas, where Gen. Holmes would take good care of them. From Fort Pillow I would compel the forces at Corinth and Jackson, Tenn., to fall back precipitately to Humboldt and Columbus, or their lines of communication would be cut off also. We would then pursue them vigorously beyond the Mississippi at Columbus, or the Ohio at Paducah. We would thus compel the enemy to evacuate the State of Mississippi and Western Tennessee, with probably the loss on our part of a few hundred men. General Price could then be detached into Missouri to support his friends, where his presence alone would be worth an army to the Confederacy. The armament and ammunition of the works referred to to be collected as soon as possible at Meridian and Chattanooga. Such are the operations which I would carry into effect, with such modifications as circumstances might require, if the President had judg
Stevenson (search for this): article 7
ne river, (the Tennessee,) and afterwards by two, (the Tennessee and Cumberland.) hence they will be unable to support each other, being unprovided with pontoon trains; but their operations must be more or less dependent on or connected with each other. I will first refer to those in East Tennessee, and then to those west of it. In the first case, our objective point must be, first Louisville, and then Cincinnati. How best to reach them from Chattanooga, with Buell at Huntsville and Stevenson, is the question. It is evident he has the advantage of two bases of operations — the Cumberland and Tennessee rivers — and that if we advance towards our objective points without getting rid of him we would expose our lines of communication with Chattanooga. We must then give him battle first, or compel him to retire before us. Should he retire on Nashville (as the newspapers say he is now doing) we will be advancing towards Louisville; but should he venture on Florence or Savannah
E. Kirby Smith (search for this): article 7
te the first is evidently inadmissible and the last cannot be entertained for one moment, for action — action — action is what we require. Now, with regard to the other two propositions, it is evident that unless you reinforce General E. K., Smith at Chattanooga he will be overpowered by Buell, and then our communication with the East and our supplies at Atlanta, Augusta, &c., will be cut off; also, that a partial reinforcement would so weaken you at Tupelo as to paralyze you for any other movements from there; hence you have adopted the wisest course in sending to Smith all your available forces, except just enough to guard your depots, &c., to the rear of your present position at Tupelo. The third proposition would have afforded you some success, but not as brilliant and important in its results as the second one, if the newspapers will permit you to carry it successfully into effect, for Halleck and Buell occupying the base of a long isosceles triangle, of which Mobile i
to Chattanooga you ought to take the offensive, keeping in mind the following grand principles of the art of war: First, always bring the masses of your army in contact with the fractions of the enemy; second, operate as much as possible on his communications without exposing your own; third, operate always on interior or shorter lines. I have no doubt that, with anything like equal numbers, you will always meet with success. I am happy to see that my two Lieutenants, Morgan and Forrest, are doing such good service in Kentucky and Tennessee. When I appointed them I thought they would leave their mark wherever they passed. By the by, I think we ought hereafter, in our official papers, to call the "Yankees" "Abolitionists" instead of "Federal," for they now proclaim not only the abolition of slavery, but of all our constitutional rights; and that name will have a stinging effect on our Western enemies. I intend to issue a general order on the subject whenever I assu
G. T. Beauregard (search for this): article 7
ntinue our extracts from Northern papers of the 17th inst.: Captured Confederate letters — Beauregard's plans for the Western Campaign. The following letters were captured some time ago by Geno Brigadier-General Thomas Jordan, Assistant Adjutant-General of the Confederate army: General Beauregard to Adjutant General Cooper.[Confidential] Mobile, Ala., Sept. 5, 1862. General: Unsive. Hoping for its entire success, I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant, G. T. Beauregard, General, C. S. A. General Beauregard to General Braxton Bragg.[Confidential.] ColGeneral Beauregard to General Braxton Bragg.[Confidential.] Collum Springs, Bladin, Ala., July 28, 1862. My Dear General: Your letter of the 22d inst., was only received last night. I give you with pleasure the following views on your proposed operations fissue a general order on the subject whenever I assume a command. Sincerely your friend, G. T. Beauregard. Gen. Braxton Bragg, commanding Department No. 2, Mobile, Ala. The Famous Criticism
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