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Paducah (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 7
Yazoo river would then have their line of communication by the river with the North cut off, and they would have either to surrender or cross without resources into Arkansas, where Gen. Holmes would take good care of them. From Fort Pillow I would compel the forces at Corinth and Jackson, Tenn., to fall back precipitately to Humboldt and Columbus, or their lines of communication would be cut off also. We would then pursue them vigorously beyond the Mississippi at Columbus, or the Ohio at Paducah. We would thus compel the enemy to evacuate the State of Mississippi and Western Tennessee, with probably the loss on our part of a few hundred men. General Price could then be detached into Missouri to support his friends, where his presence alone would be worth an army to the Confederacy. The armament and ammunition of the works referred to to be collected as soon as possible at Meridian and Chattanooga. Such are the operations which I would carry into effect, with such mod
Hudson (New Jersey, United States) (search for this): article 7
surprising that I want to get out of this mess? Besides, they have sent me a Major-Generalship, like all these others, dating from 4th July, muddled in a batch of new and very ordinary junior officers. Do they forget that I was appointed twelfth on the original list ? That I, on the heels of Bull Run, faced the enemy with a Jersey brigade, in advance of all others — McClellan, McDowell, et id omne genus, nearly forcing me to come back of the "Seminary." Do they forget me at Manassas ?--My Jersey brigade, that infected with panic the retiring enemy ? Has Williamsburg never come to their ears ? Oh, no ! I really feel aggravated beyond endurance. Discipline becomes degradation if not wielded with justice. Patriotism cannot, amid all her sacrifices, claim that of self-respect-- Generals, victorious in the past, are not ceded on to expose their troops unless those brave men are acknowledged. Their identity in their chief's promotion claims a date of their own high acts. Oh. no, I am
Atlanta (Georgia, United States) (search for this): article 7
ck Buell at or about Chattanooga; third, to attack Grant at or about Memphis; fourth, to remain idle at Tupelo. From what you state the first is evidently inadmissible and the last cannot be entertained for one moment, for action — action — action is what we require. Now, with regard to the other two propositions, it is evident that unless you reinforce General E. K., Smith at Chattanooga he will be overpowered by Buell, and then our communication with the East and our supplies at Atlanta, Augusta, &c., will be cut off; also, that a partial reinforcement would so weaken you at Tupelo as to paralyze you for any other movements from there; hence you have adopted the wisest course in sending to Smith all your available forces, except just enough to guard your depots, &c., to the rear of your present position at Tupelo. The third proposition would have afforded you some success, but not as brilliant and important in its results as the second one, if the newspapers will perm
Florence, Ala. (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 7
tsville and Stevenson, is the question. It is evident he has the advantage of two bases of operations — the Cumberland and Tennessee rivers — and that if we advance towards our objective points without getting rid of him we would expose our lines of communication with Chattanooga. We must then give him battle first, or compel him to retire before us. Should he retire on Nashville (as the newspapers say he is now doing) we will be advancing towards Louisville; but should he venture on Florence or Savannah to unite his forces with Resecrans or Grant, we will have to concentrate enough of our forces from Middle and East Tennessee to follow him rapidly and defeat him in a great battle, when we would be able to resume our march as before indicated. We must, however, as soon as practicable, construct strong works to command the Tennessee and Cumberland rivers, for otherwise our communication would be cut off by the enemy as soon as these two rivers shall have risen sufficiently to ad
Meridian (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 7
lso. We would then pursue them vigorously beyond the Mississippi at Columbus, or the Ohio at Paducah. We would thus compel the enemy to evacuate the State of Mississippi and Western Tennessee, with probably the loss on our part of a few hundred men. General Price could then be detached into Missouri to support his friends, where his presence alone would be worth an army to the Confederacy. The armament and ammunition of the works referred to to be collected as soon as possible at Meridian and Chattanooga. Such are the operations which I would carry into effect, with such modifications as circumstances might require, if the President had judged proper to order me back to the command of that army which I had, with Gen. Bragg's assistance, collected together and organized, and which I had only left to recover my shattered health while my presence could be spared from it, and until he informed me that it was ready to take the offensive. Hoping for its entire success, I re
Grand Junction (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 7
achment of our army could, I think, take Louisville, while the main body would be marching to Cincinnati; but if we could get boats enough it would be shorter to go up the Ohio in them. To keep the command of Cincinnati would construct a strong work, heavily armed, at Covington. Now for the operation in Western Tennessee.--The object there should be to drive the enemy from there, and resume the command of the Mississippi river for these purposes. I would concentrate rapidly at Grand Junction Price's army, and all that could be spared from Vicksburg of Van Dorn's. From there I would make a forced march to Fort Pillow, which I would take with probably only a very small loss. It is evident the forces at Memphis and Yazoo river would then have their line of communication by the river with the North cut off, and they would have either to surrender or cross without resources into Arkansas, where Gen. Holmes would take good care of them. From Fort Pillow I would compel the forces
Missouri (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 7
good care of them. From Fort Pillow I would compel the forces at Corinth and Jackson, Tenn., to fall back precipitately to Humboldt and Columbus, or their lines of communication would be cut off also. We would then pursue them vigorously beyond the Mississippi at Columbus, or the Ohio at Paducah. We would thus compel the enemy to evacuate the State of Mississippi and Western Tennessee, with probably the loss on our part of a few hundred men. General Price could then be detached into Missouri to support his friends, where his presence alone would be worth an army to the Confederacy. The armament and ammunition of the works referred to to be collected as soon as possible at Meridian and Chattanooga. Such are the operations which I would carry into effect, with such modifications as circumstances might require, if the President had judged proper to order me back to the command of that army which I had, with Gen. Bragg's assistance, collected together and organized, and w
Mexico (Mexico, Mexico) (search for this): article 7
just as I at once comprehended the moves of the portion. He will only get us in more jollies, more waste of blood, fighting by driblets. He has loss the confidence of all Nor has he a single officer about him capable of bettering us. Sumner is a "bull in a china shop," and a sure enough blunderer.--lost his corps gratuitously at Fair Oaks. He is not now in his right place, and will be much worse. --is a small brain, ossified in a "4 company" garrison on the frontier. He was not "of us" in Mexico, but in a rear column once saw a distant flash in a guerrilla fight. His skill is a myth — a political version of his own part at Bull Run. Porter is good in nature, but weak as water — the parent of all the disaster for his want of generalship on the Chickahominy.--and Franklin are talented engineers. They might make good Generals if they understood the value of elements in their calculations; as it is, they are dangerous failures. When — was drunk, he had some few men drowned befo<
Arkansas (Arkansas, United States) (search for this): article 7
command of the Mississippi river for these purposes. I would concentrate rapidly at Grand Junction Price's army, and all that could be spared from Vicksburg of Van Dorn's. From there I would make a forced march to Fort Pillow, which I would take with probably only a very small loss. It is evident the forces at Memphis and Yazoo river would then have their line of communication by the river with the North cut off, and they would have either to surrender or cross without resources into Arkansas, where Gen. Holmes would take good care of them. From Fort Pillow I would compel the forces at Corinth and Jackson, Tenn., to fall back precipitately to Humboldt and Columbus, or their lines of communication would be cut off also. We would then pursue them vigorously beyond the Mississippi at Columbus, or the Ohio at Paducah. We would thus compel the enemy to evacuate the State of Mississippi and Western Tennessee, with probably the loss on our part of a few hundred men. General Pric
Fort Pillow (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 7
om there, and resume the command of the Mississippi river for these purposes. I would concentrate rapidly at Grand Junction Price's army, and all that could be spared from Vicksburg of Van Dorn's. From there I would make a forced march to Fort Pillow, which I would take with probably only a very small loss. It is evident the forces at Memphis and Yazoo river would then have their line of communication by the river with the North cut off, and they would have either to surrender or cross without resources into Arkansas, where Gen. Holmes would take good care of them. From Fort Pillow I would compel the forces at Corinth and Jackson, Tenn., to fall back precipitately to Humboldt and Columbus, or their lines of communication would be cut off also. We would then pursue them vigorously beyond the Mississippi at Columbus, or the Ohio at Paducah. We would thus compel the enemy to evacuate the State of Mississippi and Western Tennessee, with probably the loss on our part of a few
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