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ermined to give him battle there, and accordingly concentrated three divisions of my old command — the army of the Mississippi, now under Major General Polk--Cheatham's, Buckner's, and Anderson's — and directed Gen. Polk to take the command on the 7th, and attack the enemy next morning. Withers's division had gone the day before to support Smith. Hearing, on the night of the 7th, that the force in front of Smith had rapidly retreated, I moved early next morning, to be present at the operation7th, that the force in front of Smith had rapidly retreated, I moved early next morning, to be present at the operations of Polk's forces. The two armies were formed confronting each other, on opposite sides of the town of Perryville. After consulting the General, and reconnoitering the ground and examining his dispositions, I declined to assume the command, but suggested some changes and modifications of his arrangements, which he promptly adopted. The action opened at 12½ P. M. between the skirmishers and artillery on both sides. Finding the enemy indisposed to advance upon us, and knowing he was rece
Affairs in Nashville. --Advices from Nashville are to the 9th inst. In the city there are, all told, 16 Federal regiments, averaging some 400 men to the regiment. Gen. Negley is still in command. Much discontent prevails among the Yankee soldiers because of the scarcity of provisions. They have recently received but one ration of meat per week, and for some time they have received no pay. Many of them receive orders for clothing, boots, &c., upon the Commissary Department, which, as soon as they receive, they sell for anything they can get for them. Our informant bought a pair of fine boots from one of them for $2.50. Discipline, too, is lax with the soldiers. They are tolerated in many excesses, while citizens are treated with great severity. Since provisions have grown scarce in Nashville the houses of private citizens are daily entered and robbed of whatever can be found to eat, no matter how small the quantity. Andy Johnson is still in Nashville, but is much disco
Third company of Howitzers. --In the artillery dual preceding the Yankee occupation of Charlestown, on the 16th inst., Capt. Benj. H. Smith, Jr., of the third company Richmond Howitzers, lost a leg, and fell into the hands of the enemy. Lieut. Henry C. Carter, of the same company, was wounded in the breast, and private R. B. Brown, a gallant soldier, was killed. This we learn from a letter written by a member of the company, in which no further casualties are reported.
From the North. We continue our extracts from Northern papers of the 18th inst.: Wholesale Desertion of Federal paroled prisoners. Major General Wallace was ordered to Columbus to organize the paroled prisoners already there, and those hereafter to be sent there, for a campaign against the Indians. The General, upon his arrival at Columbus, found the greatest confusion existing. On his first visit to Camp Chase he gathered together the paroled prisoners, numbering about 4,000 men, and addressed them at length upon the object of his mission. The results of his operations there, so far, are detailed by the Cincinnati Enquirer, of Monday, which says: The work of organization was at once commenced, and as it progressed the companies were marched from Camp Chase to Columbus, furnished with new clothing and paid off. The companies were then ordered to Camp Thomas where the new regiments were to encamp preparatory to leaving for the Indian territories. The men were not
ent on to be examined before a called Court, to be holden on the 27th October. The prisoner is also claimed by the military authorities as a deserter. Cora Morris, charged with getting drunk and abusing Joseph H. Boxley in an obscene manner, on Monday, was ordered to be committed; but Henry Parkhurst going her ball in $100, she was released from custody. Wm. S. Conley, Charged with cutting, stabbing and wounding Mary J. McMinn, on 2d street, was committed for examination on the 22d inst. Fines of $2 each were imposed on Messrs. John H. Greanor, M. G. Whitman, James Tyrer, Christian Kinsey, and Mrs. Susan Tyrer and Catherine Williams, for their children throwing rocks in the street. Sarah, slave of Wm. W. Minor, was ordered to be whipped for using obscene and violent language to Joanna Shehan. Owen Riley and Elias Vanderlip, a citizen of Richmond, were required to answer the charge of garroting Lindsay Smith, a soldier, on Saturday night, on Grace street, and
the field, after capturing about 30 of the mutineers. It is well known in Columbus that there are at least 2,000 of the paroled prisoners distributed throughout the State without leave. The 1st regiment, under Col. Neff, organized with over 1,000 men, now only numbers 400, and these are only detained by the most diligent and close watching. Execution of ten Missourian. The Missourians who had violated their oath of allegiance to the United States were executed at Hudson on the 28th ult. A correspondent of the Philadelphia Press gives the following account of the scene: The execution ground was about half a mile from the town, and when I reached there I found the troops drawn up on three sides of a square, while the fourth was occupied by the condemned and firing parties. After some time occupied in the preliminary preparations, each prisoner was blindfolded and knelt in front of his own execution party. A venerable-looking, gray headed chaplain, now stepped out fr
r to sell some wheat, and got lost. He was a little nigger, and was arraigned as runaway or lost. The latter appeared to be the most probable, and he was sent to jail to await the call of his master, who had advertised for him as a lost darkey. The subject was both small and young. Geo. Washington, a venerable Ethiopian, slave of Maria Bond, was committed for going at large. Jas. McCabe, alias Johnson, arrested as one of the murderers of Kelley and Downes on the 9th of last. May, on 17th street, was brought up for examination. The case was continued, at the suggestion of the Mayor, on account of the absence of witnesses. W. W. Bingham charged with stealing Lizzie, slave of Sarah man of Macon, Ga., was arraigned for examination. It was in evidence that Bingham hired the girl in Georgia to wait on his child, with a knowledge on the part of her mistress that he was coming to Richmond. After his arrival here he had occasion to thrash Lizzie for some imaginary or real
October 21st (search for this): article 1
Latest from Bragg's army. Mobile, Oct. 21. --A special dispatch to the Advertiser and Register, dated Holly Springs, yesterday, says: The enemy in front of Corinth yesterday made a reconnaissance to our lines under a flag of truce. The pretext was to see about the pretended ill treatment of their prisoners in our hands, and remonstrate against the guerrilla system.--There is nothing reliable regarding the reported evacuation of Corinth. Upwards of 500 prisoner, taken at Corinth, arrived at Jackson to day. Several hundred of our wounded are at Corinth, where they are well treated. The Federal regard the loss on each side as equal.
October 21st (search for this): article 9
Proceedings in the Courts. Mayor's Court, October 21. --John Miller, a man with curly hair, moustache and imperial, and subdued, meek look, was arraigned for committing a violent asssult on Mary Wolff, living in Jail Alley. The woman being disabled by the attack of Miller, which consisted of a knock down, stamping, "c., was unable to appear. The case was continued. Cornelius, slave of Wm. Hoe, of King George county, came to town with his master to sell some wheat, and got lost. He was a little nigger, and was arraigned as runaway or lost. The latter appeared to be the most probable, and he was sent to jail to await the call of his master, who had advertised for him as a lost darkey. The subject was both small and young. Geo. Washington, a venerable Ethiopian, slave of Maria Bond, was committed for going at large. Jas. McCabe, alias Johnson, arrested as one of the murderers of Kelley and Downes on the 9th of last. May, on 17th street, was brought up for e
October 27th (search for this): article 9
ter his arrival here he had occasion to thrash Lizzie for some imaginary or real grievance, and the latter telegraphed to her mistress that Bingham was trying to sell her. Hence Bingham's arrest and hence his discharge, which ensued to-day. The negro, who was still in his possession, he directed to be delivered to officer Seal. Michael Burns, charged with aiding Thomas Dobson in stealing Julius A. Gantt's horse, was sent on to be examined before a called Court, to be holden on the 27th October. The prisoner is also claimed by the military authorities as a deserter. Cora Morris, charged with getting drunk and abusing Joseph H. Boxley in an obscene manner, on Monday, was ordered to be committed; but Henry Parkhurst going her ball in $100, she was released from custody. Wm. S. Conley, Charged with cutting, stabbing and wounding Mary J. McMinn, on 2d street, was committed for examination on the 22d inst. Fines of $2 each were imposed on Messrs. John H. Greanor, M. G
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