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Farmville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
ifference in the price of articles of "prime necessity" exists in various localities of the South; for instance, the "staff of life," which is selling in Mobile at $40 per barrel, while in Richmond it commands for the very best quality, $27, and in Winchester it only brings from $8 to $12 per barrel. Wheat at no time since the war commenced has cold here for more than $4.00 per bushel, but in Alabama it ranges from $4 to $5, and in King and Queen county, in this State, it is sailing for one dollar per bushel! In Danville, Farmville, Lynchburg, and Staunton, butter is selling (for fresh) at 50 cents per pound, while in Richmond markets it is retailing at $1.50 per pound.--The commodity of coffee, strange to say, is now selling here at while in Mobile, where it ought to sell at lower rates, it commands $8 a pound readily at public auction. In the articles enumerated, the rates and fluctuations are due in a great measure, if not altogether, to the adequate transportation facilities.
Alabama (Alabama, United States) (search for this): article 2
The difference. --A marked difference in the price of articles of "prime necessity" exists in various localities of the South; for instance, the "staff of life," which is selling in Mobile at $40 per barrel, while in Richmond it commands for the very best quality, $27, and in Winchester it only brings from $8 to $12 per barrel. Wheat at no time since the war commenced has cold here for more than $4.00 per bushel, but in Alabama it ranges from $4 to $5, and in King and Queen county, in this State, it is sailing for one dollar per bushel! In Danville, Farmville, Lynchburg, and Staunton, butter is selling (for fresh) at 50 cents per pound, while in Richmond markets it is retailing at $1.50 per pound.--The commodity of coffee, strange to say, is now selling here at while in Mobile, where it ought to sell at lower rates, it commands $8 a pound readily at public auction. In the articles enumerated, the rates and fluctuations are due in a great measure, if not altogether, to the ade
Danville (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 2
difference in the price of articles of "prime necessity" exists in various localities of the South; for instance, the "staff of life," which is selling in Mobile at $40 per barrel, while in Richmond it commands for the very best quality, $27, and in Winchester it only brings from $8 to $12 per barrel. Wheat at no time since the war commenced has cold here for more than $4.00 per bushel, but in Alabama it ranges from $4 to $5, and in King and Queen county, in this State, it is sailing for one dollar per bushel! In Danville, Farmville, Lynchburg, and Staunton, butter is selling (for fresh) at 50 cents per pound, while in Richmond markets it is retailing at $1.50 per pound.--The commodity of coffee, strange to say, is now selling here at while in Mobile, where it ought to sell at lower rates, it commands $8 a pound readily at public auction. In the articles enumerated, the rates and fluctuations are due in a great measure, if not altogether, to the adequate transportation facilities.
The difference. --A marked difference in the price of articles of "prime necessity" exists in various localities of the South; for instance, the "staff of life," which is selling in Mobile at $40 per barrel, while in Richmond it commands for the very best quality, $27, and in Winchester it only brings from $8 to $12 per barrel. Wheat at no time since the war commenced has cold here for more than $4.00 per bushel, but in Alabama it ranges from $4 to $5, and in King and Queen county, in this State, it is sailing for one dollar per bushel! In Danville, Farmville, Lynchburg, and Staunton, butter is selling (for fresh) at 50 cents per pound, while in Richmond markets it is retailing at $1.50 per pound.--The commodity of coffee, strange to say, is now selling here at while in Mobile, where it ought to sell at lower rates, it commands $8 a pound readily at public auction. In the articles enumerated, the rates and fluctuations are due in a great measure, if not altogether, to the adeq