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ech by Mr. John Van Buren, who declared that he had never supported a candidate with more satisfaction than he should support Mr. Seymour. Still he had, following the suggestion of an intelligent and sagacious editor, recently proposed, with Mr. Seymour's concurrence, that both candidates for the Governorship should withdraw in favor of General Dix. He denounced General Wadsworth as an open, bitter, malignant enemy of General McClellan, and gave as his authority for that statement Commissary General Welsh, of this State. If General Wadsworth had not changed his views in regard to his superior officer, then he was a traitor, and deserved a gibbet more richly than Jefferson Davis himself. In regard to General Scott's letter to Mr. Seward, he said that the mode of his obtaining it was a secret, and that a most accomplished and cultivated lady was helping him to keep the secret. As to the statement made in the Evening Post in regard to his dining in the club room at the same table wit
Wadsworth (search for this): article 6
Mr. Seymour. Still he had, following the suggestion of an intelligent and sagacious editor, recently proposed, with Mr. Seymour's concurrence, that both candidates for the Governorship should withdraw in favor of General Dix. He denounced General Wadsworth as an open, bitter, malignant enemy of General McClellan, and gave as his authority for that statement Commissary General Welsh, of this State. If General Wadsworth had not changed his views in regard to his superior officer, then he was aGeneral Wadsworth had not changed his views in regard to his superior officer, then he was a traitor, and deserved a gibbet more richly than Jefferson Davis himself. In regard to General Scott's letter to Mr. Seward, he said that the mode of his obtaining it was a secret, and that a most accomplished and cultivated lady was helping him to keep the secret. As to the statement made in the Evening Post in regard to his dining in the club room at the same table with General Scott, the day when he read that letter at the Cooper institute, he declared it to be a false statement of a priva
Harper's Ferry (West Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 6
expectations. Let him see to it that all the necessities of our Army of the Potomac are supplied at once, so that in a speedy victory all the advantages of our recent successes may be multiplied a thousand fold. Let us hear no more that "the Potomac is safely guarded;" but let us hear that the rebel army is routed, and we shall know that the Union is saved. Army Movements. The New York Herald, in its situation article, says: A reconnaissance was made on Tuesday from Harper's Ferry, under the command of General Geary, with a strong force, into Loudoun county, Virginia, which was very successful. The force consisted of the first brigade of Gen. Geary's division. The enemy was encountered at Glenmoore, a short distance beyond Hillsboro', where a sharp skirmish took place, resulting in the rout of the rebel cavalry and the capture of a number of prisoners. Continuing their march, they reached Waterford, and from thence proceeded to Lovettsville, returning early yes
Loudoun (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 6
c are supplied at once, so that in a speedy victory all the advantages of our recent successes may be multiplied a thousand fold. Let us hear no more that "the Potomac is safely guarded;" but let us hear that the rebel army is routed, and we shall know that the Union is saved. Army Movements. The New York Herald, in its situation article, says: A reconnaissance was made on Tuesday from Harper's Ferry, under the command of General Geary, with a strong force, into Loudoun county, Virginia, which was very successful. The force consisted of the first brigade of Gen. Geary's division. The enemy was encountered at Glenmoore, a short distance beyond Hillsboro', where a sharp skirmish took place, resulting in the rout of the rebel cavalry and the capture of a number of prisoners. Continuing their march, they reached Waterford, and from thence proceeded to Lovettsville, returning early yesterday. The expedition resulted in the capture of seventy-five prisoners, includin
Covington (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 6
has sent a letter to Governor Bradford, of Maryland, in reply to the communication referring to the services of the army in that State at the recent battle. The General's letter is modest, but warm and appreciative of the flattering terms employed by the Governor towards the Army of the Potomac. Movements in the west. Dispatches from Cincinnati state that Brig. Gen. Jeff. C. Davis, who recently shot Gen. Nelson, at Louisville, has been placed in command of the Union forces in Covington, Ky. Humphrey Marshall is said to be retreating from Mount Sterling towards East Tennessee, with a force of 3,000 men. The Federal troops were in pursuit. Gen. Bragg is moving through Cumberland Gap and Gen. Buell is lying with his main army at Crab Orchard. Money Market. New York, Oct. 22 --P. M.--Virginia 6's 68 to 68½; North Carolina 6's 68½. The Board of Brokers this morning, by a very large majority, decided not to allow transactions within the Board in gold or demand note
Childsburg (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 6
ely guarded;" but let us hear that the rebel army is routed, and we shall know that the Union is saved. Army Movements. The New York Herald, in its situation article, says: A reconnaissance was made on Tuesday from Harper's Ferry, under the command of General Geary, with a strong force, into Loudoun county, Virginia, which was very successful. The force consisted of the first brigade of Gen. Geary's division. The enemy was encountered at Glenmoore, a short distance beyond Hillsboro', where a sharp skirmish took place, resulting in the rout of the rebel cavalry and the capture of a number of prisoners. Continuing their march, they reached Waterford, and from thence proceeded to Lovettsville, returning early yesterday. The expedition resulted in the capture of seventy-five prisoners, including a number of officers. Among the latter were Captains Grubb and Everton. Another reconnaissance, was made on the same day, across the river opposite Knoxville, where a reb
United States (United States) (search for this): article 6
g in the club room at the same table with General Scott, the day when he read that letter at the Cooper institute, he declared it to be a false statement of a private conversation made by Charles King, of Columbia College, the only man in the United States who ever assailed a dead woman--Mrs. General Jackson. He (Mr. Van Buren) was but a private in the ranks; but, if he had command of the army, and ever got to Richmond, he would say, "Gallant Greeley, advance! Forward, the black brigade! Penhe brutal helots of the South, it would be the highest duty of European nations, as civilized and Christian nations, to interfere. The reason why M'Clellan Don't advance. The New York Herald gives the following reasons to satisfy the United States public why McClellan remains idle on the wrong side of the Potomac: We are assured that Gen. McClellan is anxious to advance. We know that his army is, and we have no doubt of its success if it should advance to day and compel the enem
Tennessee (Tennessee, United States) (search for this): article 6
ferring to the services of the army in that State at the recent battle. The General's letter is modest, but warm and appreciative of the flattering terms employed by the Governor towards the Army of the Potomac. Movements in the west. Dispatches from Cincinnati state that Brig. Gen. Jeff. C. Davis, who recently shot Gen. Nelson, at Louisville, has been placed in command of the Union forces in Covington, Ky. Humphrey Marshall is said to be retreating from Mount Sterling towards East Tennessee, with a force of 3,000 men. The Federal troops were in pursuit. Gen. Bragg is moving through Cumberland Gap and Gen. Buell is lying with his main army at Crab Orchard. Money Market. New York, Oct. 22 --P. M.--Virginia 6's 68 to 68½; North Carolina 6's 68½. The Board of Brokers this morning, by a very large majority, decided not to allow transactions within the Board in gold or demand notes, after Monday next. As soon as the vote was known, gold, which had risen from 132 t
South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 6
e table with General Scott, the day when he read that letter at the Cooper institute, he declared it to be a false statement of a private conversation made by Charles King, of Columbia College, the only man in the United States who ever assailed a dead woman--Mrs. General Jackson. He (Mr. Van Buren) was but a private in the ranks; but, if he had command of the army, and ever got to Richmond, he would say, "Gallant Greeley, advance! Forward, the black brigade! Penetrate to the heart of South Carolina, and stay there forever." He declared it as his opinion that if there should be an attempt to make this a war for the abolition of slavery, and to arm the brutal helots of the South, it would be the highest duty of European nations, as civilized and Christian nations, to interfere. The reason why M'Clellan Don't advance. The New York Herald gives the following reasons to satisfy the United States public why McClellan remains idle on the wrong side of the Potomac: We are as
North Carolina (North Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 6
Cincinnati state that Brig. Gen. Jeff. C. Davis, who recently shot Gen. Nelson, at Louisville, has been placed in command of the Union forces in Covington, Ky. Humphrey Marshall is said to be retreating from Mount Sterling towards East Tennessee, with a force of 3,000 men. The Federal troops were in pursuit. Gen. Bragg is moving through Cumberland Gap and Gen. Buell is lying with his main army at Crab Orchard. Money Market. New York, Oct. 22 --P. M.--Virginia 6's 68 to 68½; North Carolina 6's 68½. The Board of Brokers this morning, by a very large majority, decided not to allow transactions within the Board in gold or demand notes, after Monday next. As soon as the vote was known, gold, which had risen from 132 to 134, fell to 199. At this figure everybody rushed in to buy, and the price rose steadily to 130, 131, 132 and 132½. The last price of the day was 132½ Demand notes fluctuated about as rapidly between 127 and 129. As for exchange, it is impossible to give qu
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