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Galena (Illinois, United States) (search for this): article 11
leaders to say: "Now you see we were right as to the intentions of the Lincoln Government when we induced you to began this war" Affairs in Hampton Roads. Newport News has been converted into a hospital station by the Federal, and the old water battery dismantled. The Cumberland, which was sunk by the Merrimac, is to be raised. A letter to the Boston JournalSays: The fleet lying in James river consists of the Minnesota, (flag ship of Act. Rear Admiral Lee,) New Ironsides, Galena, and Miami. The Genesee and Mahaska have been withdrawn, and other gun- boats are expected to take their places. The Minnesota rails to any for Boston, where it is understood some changes will be made in her armament. The New Ironsides presents a formidable appearance at her moorings. She has proved herself, contrary to general expectation an excellent sea boat, and in action will undoubtedly be a splendid success. She steamed around a short distance on Friday, and practiced firing up t
Porto Rico (search for this): article 11
reasonable to hope that the supply may turn out to have been underrated even for the coming season. The reports from Jamaica are in the night of degree encouraging, both as to the flourishing condition of the growing crop and the rapid increase of the area devoted to cotton. In Guiana and the proprietors are setting heartily to work to procure the requisite labor, which may probably be supplied from the United States. Agricultural machinery of the highest order has been sent out to Porto Rico, which is expected to supply a large quantity, not less than the produce of 2,000 acres, next year and the quality of the West India cotton is declared to be scarcely short of the highest rated of American. Already we see that as time passes on, we find ourselves under the process of being weaned from our obstinate reliance on the slave States, and from month to month we shall learn to give up the irrational hope of any settlement in America which can restore the old state of affairs.
Miami, Mo. (Missouri, United States) (search for this): article 11
ry dismantled. The Cumberland, which was sunk by the Merrimac, is to be raised. A letter to the Boston JournalSays: The fleet lying in James river consists of the Minnesota, (flag ship of Act. Rear Admiral Lee,) New Ironsides, Galena, and Miami. The Genesee and Mahaska have been withdrawn, and other gun- boats are expected to take their places. The Minnesota rails to any for Boston, where it is understood some changes will be made in her armament. The New Ironsides presents a formidaement. Several shots are fixed in her hull; some penetrated her iron plated sides, and one or two made clean holes through the funnel. Captain Rogers is a fighting man, and is all ready for Merrimac No. 2, or any other rebel demonstration. The Miami (side wheel gunboat) is on picket duty for the present. and will probably be ordered home before long for repairs, as she needs a thorough overhauling. She came here from the Western Gulf squadron, where she rendered important service in the ca
West Indies (search for this): article 11
irs, will yield 31,346 bates per week. The sources of this supply are India, the Brazil, Egypt, Turkey, Greece, Italy chance car goes from America, and "other sources" These "other sources" are credited with only 25,000. Considering that the West Indies are included under this head, it is reasonable to hope that the supply may turn out to have been underrated even for the coming season. The reports from Jamaica are in the night of degree encouraging, both as to the flourishing condition probably be supplied from the United States. Agricultural machinery of the highest order has been sent out to Porto Rico, which is expected to supply a large quantity, not less than the produce of 2,000 acres, next year and the quality of the West India cotton is declared to be scarcely short of the highest rated of American. Already we see that as time passes on, we find ourselves under the process of being weaned from our obstinate reliance on the slave States, and from month to month we sh
Jamaica, L. I. (New York, United States) (search for this): article 11
as been 15,273 and the promised supply, independent of any change in American affairs, will yield 31,346 bates per week. The sources of this supply are India, the Brazil, Egypt, Turkey, Greece, Italy chance car goes from America, and "other sources" These "other sources" are credited with only 25,000. Considering that the West Indies are included under this head, it is reasonable to hope that the supply may turn out to have been underrated even for the coming season. The reports from Jamaica are in the night of degree encouraging, both as to the flourishing condition of the growing crop and the rapid increase of the area devoted to cotton. In Guiana and the proprietors are setting heartily to work to procure the requisite labor, which may probably be supplied from the United States. Agricultural machinery of the highest order has been sent out to Porto Rico, which is expected to supply a large quantity, not less than the produce of 2,000 acres, next year and the quality of th
Bardstown (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 11
Morgan, has performed deeds which rival Stuart's raid into Pennsylvania. He has trotted round Buell as Stuart did around McClellan. He made a dash into Lexington drove out our forces into Merciless then round the Kentucky river to Lawrenceburg, and swept. on to Bards town. At Cox Creek he came upon a wagon train and burned eighty one wagon, taking the teamsters and guards prisoners. Thirty of the wagons were empty, the others laden with supplies for Wood's division. Pushing on toward Bardstown, he captured another large train and burned it, and when last heard from was pushing Southwest, evidently to destroy the Lebanon Branch Railroad and then to push on towards Munfordsville and destroy the Nashville Railroad--all of which he will undoubtedly accomplish. The train dust last night from Munfordsville is not in. Probably it is destroyed. He has a force of twelve hundred cavalry. Gen. Dumont is following but Morgan changes horses continually, while Dumont's are worn down. T
Dauphin (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 11
carried, and told Downey that he was prepared to defend himself; whereupon Downey drew a knife and stabbed Saunders in the threat, the blood gushing freely. By that time a crowed had attracted by the noise. Downey was arrested and taken before Alderman Kline, where, I believe, the above facts were elicited. Saunders was taken to the residence of a physician, where he lies in a critical condition, his life being despaired of. Downey is now in prison. committed for a hearing in the Dauphin County Court. He is dressed in plan, coarse clothing, and has the looks of a rough Western of Southern man, and I understand is from Baltimore, some say New York. A Yankee Abroad giving the effect of the proclamation. The New York Worldsays the following in an extract from a letters written by an American gentleman of the highest character and positions, now resident in Europe, always unwavering in his devotion to the Government and hitherto a faithful supporter of the administration
Southwestern States (United States) (search for this): article 11
Buell as Stuart did around McClellan. He made a dash into Lexington drove out our forces into Merciless then round the Kentucky river to Lawrenceburg, and swept. on to Bards town. At Cox Creek he came upon a wagon train and burned eighty one wagon, taking the teamsters and guards prisoners. Thirty of the wagons were empty, the others laden with supplies for Wood's division. Pushing on toward Bardstown, he captured another large train and burned it, and when last heard from was pushing Southwest, evidently to destroy the Lebanon Branch Railroad and then to push on towards Munfordsville and destroy the Nashville Railroad--all of which he will undoubtedly accomplish. The train dust last night from Munfordsville is not in. Probably it is destroyed. He has a force of twelve hundred cavalry. Gen. Dumont is following but Morgan changes horses continually, while Dumont's are worn down. There is no force in front of Morgan. He can have things all his own way. It is supposed he is
Sebastopol (Illinois, United States) (search for this): article 11
nd not as they have, by flotations paper and sanguine promises to pay. Nor has the effect upon the temper of the North itself been less unfortunate than the effect, upon Europe. The most remarkable quality which the Northerners have shown is their ignorant and stupid patience. Probably an Englishman is more struck by this quality than any one who would be because he is very subject to political impatience in the presence of obvious disaster. During the sufferings of our army before Sebastopol our impatience was not only remarkable, but excessive; if there had been any obvious guilty person to hang for that matter, we should have hung him immediately. What, then should we feel if at the critics of our national fate — at the hour when our national existences was threatened by a great rebellion — the resources of money and men; which we lavished without slant or hesitation, had been fritted and wasted away, without achievement and without glory, in stupid enterprises and shameful
Lawrenceburg (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 11
to Louisville, and receiving all the abuse which is the result of a failure. The letter acknowledges that Bragg took over 4,000 wagons of provisions away with him, and the Federal only succeeded in recapturing forty. The letter adds; The rebel partisan, Morgan, has performed deeds which rival Stuart's raid into Pennsylvania. He has trotted round Buell as Stuart did around McClellan. He made a dash into Lexington drove out our forces into Merciless then round the Kentucky river to Lawrenceburg, and swept. on to Bards town. At Cox Creek he came upon a wagon train and burned eighty one wagon, taking the teamsters and guards prisoners. Thirty of the wagons were empty, the others laden with supplies for Wood's division. Pushing on toward Bardstown, he captured another large train and burned it, and when last heard from was pushing Southwest, evidently to destroy the Lebanon Branch Railroad and then to push on towards Munfordsville and destroy the Nashville Railroad--all of whic
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