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Richmond (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 11
can only be to make them more and more desperate in their resistance, and to enable their leaders to say: "Now you see we were right as to the intentions of the Lincoln Government when we induced you to began this war" Affairs in Hampton Roads. Newport News has been converted into a hospital station by the Federal, and the old water battery dismantled. The Cumberland, which was sunk by the Merrimac, is to be raised. A letter to the Boston JournalSays: The fleet lying in James river consists of the Minnesota, (flag ship of Act. Rear Admiral Lee,) New Ironsides, Galena, and Miami. The Genesee and Mahaska have been withdrawn, and other gun- boats are expected to take their places. The Minnesota rails to any for Boston, where it is understood some changes will be made in her armament. The New Ironsides presents a formidable appearance at her moorings. She has proved herself, contrary to general expectation an excellent sea boat, and in action will undoubtedly be a s
put in the latest. He remained asleep, while Bragg jumped into the ring captured Munfordsville, and begun his ravages of Kentucky. Instead of moving boldly to attack Bragg with a superior force, he avoided him, and moved on the are of a circle, while Bragg moved along the cord, in a race Northward. Having headed Bragg off as a boy heads off a flock of sheep browsing by the way, and having had his army increased to twice the size of Bragg's, he commences to drive him out. He permits Me- Cook to be overpowered at Perryville, when School is close at hand waiting orders to join in the fight. He moves upon the retreating Bragg with no hope of over raking him. He leaves Nashville exposed. He gives up the pursuit, and is now returning North with a disappointed dispirited army. Such is the record. It is painful to write it. Shall I retrain from giving facts? I cannot alter them. It is not my intention to write fiction, neither is it my purpose to withhold truth, although it may be
nd hitherto a faithful supporter of the administration. "I have just read Lincoln's proclamation, and I am hopeless. The whole nature of the war I consider chaest confidence in their leaders, speak highly of McClellan, and assure us that Lincoln's proclamation has united the South all the more closely as one man for the wa with the President Secretary Stanton and Gen. Halleck. First case under Lincoln's proclamation. The following paragraph is from the Washington correspondean restore the old state of affairs. The Military Dictatorship. That Lincoln is to be the Military Dictator of the United States, and that very soon, seemsishmen are in great trouble at the and unconstitutionality of the acts of President Lincoln. They have a great tenderness for the Constitution and the leave and cruout glory, in stupid enterprises and shameful full-scale We should have bung Mr. Lincoln, or Mrs Stanton, or "somebody. "The whole country would have been convulsed
of Morgan — Difficulty in Catching him. A letter, dated Cincinnati, the 21st ult., says that Buell, with his grand army, 140,000 strong, was returning to Louisville, and receiving all the abuse w, Morgan, has performed deeds which rival Stuart's raid into Pennsylvania. He has trotted round Buell as Stuart did around McClellan. He made a dash into Lexington drove out our forces into Mercilearmy in the same direction. Gen. Negley is there with about five thousand men. A sketch of Buell as a Strategist. The unhappy Buell, who did notbag Bragg, as we were repeatedly assured by tecting the Gulf States with Richmond. He was desirous of pouncing upon it but was restrained by Buell. All through the summer Buell was in striking distance of that railroad, with a powerful army, war is a stern, a terrible reality, and it is best for all to see things just as they are. if Gen. Buell has anything to say in extenuation of his course let him by all means be heard. He has been i
ple independently of the American growers: The day was sure to arrive when the general inability to believe in a supply of cotton from other sources than the American cotton States must give way before the facts. That day seems to be near at band. At the end of last week the cargoes from India began to arrive. Upwards of 10,000 bales from Bombay came in during three days, and the quantity from that port actually at sea and at Liverpool was found to be about 397,000 bales; so that Mr. Villers, whose promises were held to be trash when he spoke of 400,000 bales appears to be fully justified in the hopefulness of his tone. The next disclosures was that we have a prospect of a supply, in 1863, of 1,630,000 out of the 4,000,000, which is the largest quantity desired at the ordinary rate of prices. This amount will be just double the quantity used per week for the last three months; and thus it would seem that the worst must be past. At the recent high prices the weekly aver
h is the result of a failure. The letter acknowledges that Bragg took over 4,000 wagons of provisions away with him, and thewn way. It is supposed he is aiming for Nashville, and that Bragg is moving with the main part of his army in the same directuell as a Strategist. The unhappy Buell, who did notbag Bragg, as we were repeatedly assured by the Western papers he wou no effort to put in the latest. He remained asleep, while Bragg jumped into the ring captured Munfordsville, and begun his ravages of Kentucky. Instead of moving boldly to attack Bragg with a superior force, he avoided him, and moved on the are of a circle, while Bragg moved along the cord, in a race Northward. Having headed Bragg off as a boy heads off a flock of Bragg off as a boy heads off a flock of sheep browsing by the way, and having had his army increased to twice the size of Bragg's, he commences to drive him out. He Bragg's, he commences to drive him out. He permits Me- Cook to be overpowered at Perryville, when School is close at hand waiting orders to join in the fight. He moves
ductor. Downey than commanded him to sit elsewhere, as he would not ride in company with a negro, and threatened violence if he did not move. Saunders refused to move. Downey insisted. when the negro peined to his master's sword, which he carried, and told Downey that he was prepared to defend himself; whereupon Downey drew a knife and stabbed Saunders in the threat, the blood gushing freely. By that time a crowed had attracted by the noise. Downey was arrested and taken before Alderman Kline, where, I believe, the above facts were elicited. Saunders was taken to the residence of a physician, where he lies in a critical condition, his life being despaired of. Downey is now in prison. committed for a hearing in the Dauphin County Court. He is dressed in plan, coarse clothing, and has the looks of a rough Western of Southern man, and I understand is from Baltimore, some say New York. A Yankee Abroad giving the effect of the proclamation. The New York Worldsays the
d Abe to "run the machine" by himself. The Washington correspondent of the New York Times. is responsible for the following: The announcement that Secretary Stanton and Gen. Halleck refer all matters relating to the army of the Potomac to the President, who has relieved them of responsibility in the matter, and himself uent will "work through." Gen. Marcy, Chief of Staff to General McClellan, was in the Department to- day, and had long separate interviews with the President Secretary Stanton and Gen. Halleck. First case under Lincoln's proclamation. The following paragraph is from the Washington correspondence of the New York Timestion, had been fritted and wasted away, without achievement and without glory, in stupid enterprises and shameful full-scale We should have bung Mr. Lincoln, or Mrs Stanton, or "somebody. "The whole country would have been convulsed with irritation and sugar. But America has not been convulsed. The Northerners have looked on with
Jacob Saunders (search for this): article 11
orth rather than else where. A letter to the Philadelphia Inquirersays: It seems that Jacob Saunders, a colored servant of Colonel Hiddir, got aboard the cars for Philadelphia, and was instructascertained to be Do whey, entered and addressing the negro, said,"Get out of this, you--nigger Saunders answered that he was placed there by the conductor, and would not get out unless so offered by ere, as he would not ride in company with a negro, and threatened violence if he did not move. Saunders refused to move. Downey insisted. when the negro peined to his master's sword, which he carrid told Downey that he was prepared to defend himself; whereupon Downey drew a knife and stabbed Saunders in the threat, the blood gushing freely. By that time a crowed had attracted by the noise.was arrested and taken before Alderman Kline, where, I believe, the above facts were elicited. Saunders was taken to the residence of a physician, where he lies in a critical condition, his life bein
he Genesee and Mahaska have been withdrawn, and other gun- boats are expected to take their places. The Minnesota rails to any for Boston, where it is understood some changes will be made in her armament. The New Ironsides presents a formidable appearance at her moorings. She has proved herself, contrary to general expectation an excellent sea boat, and in action will undoubtedly be a splendid success. She steamed around a short distance on Friday, and practiced firing up the river. Captain Turner handles her skillfully, and brings her about with wonderful ease and celerity. The Galena has remained at her present moorings ever since her attack on Fort Darling last rummer. She bears fearful witness to the overwhelming superiority of the rebel position during the engagement. Several shots are fixed in her hull; some penetrated her iron plated sides, and one or two made clean holes through the funnel. Captain Rogers is a fighting man, and is all ready for Merrimac No. 2, or any o
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