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to push on towards Munfordsville and destroy the Nashville Railroad--all of which he will undoubtedly accomplish. The train dust last night from Munfordsville is not in. Probably it is destroyed. He has a force of twelve hundred cavalry. Gen. Dumont is following but Morgan changes horses continually, while Dumont's are worn down. There is no force in front of Morgan. He can have things all his own way. It is supposed he is aiming for Nashville, and that Bragg is moving with the main parDumont's are worn down. There is no force in front of Morgan. He can have things all his own way. It is supposed he is aiming for Nashville, and that Bragg is moving with the main part of his army in the same direction. Gen. Negley is there with about five thousand men. A sketch of Buell as a Strategist. The unhappy Buell, who did notbag Bragg, as we were repeatedly assured by the Western papers he would do; and who has been "relieved" for the failure, gets the following sketch from a letter in the Boston Journal. It is disheartening to see a noble cause go by default through ignorance, imbecility or treason, of those in command. Last spring Gen. Mitchell was
my of the Ohio about twelve months. He has had opportunities of doing great things. The people can draw their own conclusions at to what he has accomplished. The Irrepressible Conflict in the Cars. An affair occurred in Harrisburg, Pa. on the 27th, which shows that the proclamation is the cause of "airs" upon the past of the "man and brother" at the North rather than else where. A letter to the Philadelphia Inquirersays: It seems that Jacob Saunders, a colored servant of Colonel Hiddir, got aboard the cars for Philadelphia, and was instructs by the conductor to take a seat in the front car. Soon after a white man whose name was subsequently ascertained to be Do whey, entered and addressing the negro, said,"Get out of this, you--nigger Saunders answered that he was placed there by the conductor, and would not get out unless so offered by the conductor. Downey than commanded him to sit elsewhere, as he would not ride in company with a negro, and threatened violence if h
y the Nashville Railroad--all of which he will undoubtedly accomplish. The train dust last night from Munfordsville is not in. Probably it is destroyed. He has a force of twelve hundred cavalry. Gen. Dumont is following but Morgan changes horses continually, while Dumont's are worn down. There is no force in front of Morgan. He can have things all his own way. It is supposed he is aiming for Nashville, and that Bragg is moving with the main part of his army in the same direction. Gen. Negley is there with about five thousand men. A sketch of Buell as a Strategist. The unhappy Buell, who did notbag Bragg, as we were repeatedly assured by the Western papers he would do; and who has been "relieved" for the failure, gets the following sketch from a letter in the Boston Journal. It is disheartening to see a noble cause go by default through ignorance, imbecility or treason, of those in command. Last spring Gen. Mitchell was at Chattanooga. within twenty-five miles
sistance, and to enable their leaders to say: "Now you see we were right as to the intentions of the Lincoln Government when we induced you to began this war" Affairs in Hampton Roads. Newport News has been converted into a hospital station by the Federal, and the old water battery dismantled. The Cumberland, which was sunk by the Merrimac, is to be raised. A letter to the Boston JournalSays: The fleet lying in James river consists of the Minnesota, (flag ship of Act. Rear Admiral Lee,) New Ironsides, Galena, and Miami. The Genesee and Mahaska have been withdrawn, and other gun- boats are expected to take their places. The Minnesota rails to any for Boston, where it is understood some changes will be made in her armament. The New Ironsides presents a formidable appearance at her moorings. She has proved herself, contrary to general expectation an excellent sea boat, and in action will undoubtedly be a splendid success. She steamed around a short distance on Frid
ional vanity — the vanity of a nation which has always been successful, which cannot conceive that it can fall — has probably much to do with this strange indifference. Whatever happened they believed that they could not fail. But every additional cause which augmented this indifference has been, as far as it operates, an additional calamity. The North should have been awakened, yet it would not awake Perhaps the tax gatherer might have aroused the American people; certainly Mr. Chase's loans and paper have confirmed their foolish apathy. The present position is this: Paper at a fluctuating discount of about twenty The tax gatherer has not gone his rounds among the people, though some deductions have been made on account of the income tax from the dividends on public securities. Mr. Chases issues paper as if it would never fail him, and yet it must soon fail him. Even now every one passes it on as quickly as possible, and stocks and securities are all rising in consequence
e is to be tried under the provisions of the President's into proclamation — making civilians triable by course martial — before the court martial now in session in Pennsylvania avenue. Jackson was one of the Union nurses captured at Bull Run, and while in Richmond gave information to the Confederate authorities. The case is one of interest, being the first under the late proclamation, and will furnish a precedent. --Now, that the President has made civilians liable to trail in this way, Major Dester, Provost Marshal, is most energetic in his dealing with suspected parsons, and no distinction or favor is show into any one because he may hold a place in any of the Departments of the Government. The English cotton Faming. --The London Daily News of the 6th instant, has the following important article, showing that the English cotton manufacturers will soon be able to procure a supply of the staple independently of the American growers: The day was sure to arrive when the
ng on with the constant constitution of that question I cannot agree, that the our of the country's difficulty is their opportunity. Upon the other questions that are now attracting the attention of this country I am forming my opinions. But there is one question upon which as ancitizen of this country I despite to explain my opinion. I doubt almost at this time whether I tread the free soil of America-- whether I breathe the free air of the American continent when I see the trial by jury Daniel the suspension of the writ of habeas corpus, when I see persons immured, and it is declared that the employment of impartial counsel will aggravate their offence — when I see these things going on I must doubt I am breeching the free air of America. It was hardly possible to believe that a man could be here arrested by telegraph, and without authority — it was things like these that destroyed every notion which a European had of liberty in the United States. I was amused, said Mr. Jame
he letter adds; The rebel partisan, Morgan, has performed deeds which rival Stuart's raid into Pennsylvania. He has trotted round Buell as Stuart did around McClellan. He made a dash into Lexington drove out our forces into Merciless then round the Kentucky river to Lawrenceburg, and swept. on to Bards town. At Cox Creek hee in expressing a with that the war was over, but say they will conquer a peace or have none.--They have the fullest confidence in their leaders, speak highly of McClellan, and assure us that Lincoln's proclamation has united the South all the more closely as one man for the war. The rebels at Richmond are treating Union prisoners e facts to be as stated, and in military circles there is much interest felt as to how the President will "work through." Gen. Marcy, Chief of Staff to General McClellan, was in the Department to- day, and had long separate interviews with the President Secretary Stanton and Gen. Halleck. First case under Lincoln's proc
a prodigiously productive country, where no one is poor; where very few are idle; where there is yet a vast area of unoccupied and excellent land. Under proper management this vast wealth would have been a source of vast military strength, but Mr. Chase has so managed as to throw it away. The financial reputation of the North in Europe was at first seriously weakened by his proposal to rely solely on loans, and was altogether destroyed by the seemingly in-exhaustible issues of paper. Nor is additional cause which augmented this indifference has been, as far as it operates, an additional calamity. The North should have been awakened, yet it would not awake Perhaps the tax gatherer might have aroused the American people; certainly Mr. Chase's loans and paper have confirmed their foolish apathy. The present position is this: Paper at a fluctuating discount of about twenty The tax gatherer has not gone his rounds among the people, though some deductions have been made on accoun
continue our extracts from our Northern files of the 28th inst., Those given below are of interest The last Raids of Morgan — Difficulty in Catching him. A letter, dated Cincinnati, the 21st ult., says that Buell, with his grand army, 140,00 provisions away with him, and the Federal only succeeded in recapturing forty. The letter adds; The rebel partisan, Morgan, has performed deeds which rival Stuart's raid into Pennsylvania. He has trotted round Buell as Stuart did around McClelnfordsville is not in. Probably it is destroyed. He has a force of twelve hundred cavalry. Gen. Dumont is following but Morgan changes horses continually, while Dumont's are worn down. There is no force in front of Morgan. He can have things all Morgan. He can have things all his own way. It is supposed he is aiming for Nashville, and that Bragg is moving with the main part of his army in the same direction. Gen. Negley is there with about five thousand men. A sketch of Buell as a Strategist. The unhappy Buell,
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