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Vincent R. Jackson (search for this): article 11
t to- day, and had long separate interviews with the President Secretary Stanton and Gen. Halleck. First case under Lincoln's proclamation. The following paragraph is from the Washington correspondence of the New York Times: Vincent R. Jackson, of the Post Office Department has been again arrested, after having been released on security. He is to be tried under the provisions of the President's into proclamation — making civilians triable by course martial — before the court martial now in session in Pennsylvania avenue. Jackson was one of the Union nurses captured at Bull Run, and while in Richmond gave information to the Confederate authorities. The case is one of interest, being the first under the late proclamation, and will furnish a precedent. --Now, that the President has made civilians liable to trail in this way, Major Dester, Provost Marshal, is most energetic in his dealing with suspected parsons, and no distinction or favor is show into any one because he
hington correspondent of the New York Times. is responsible for the following: The announcement that Secretary Stanton and Gen. Halleck refer all matters relating to the army of the Potomac to the President, who has relieved them of responsibility in the matter, and himself undertaken to "run the machine," has created deep excitement. Inquiries made show the facts to be as stated, and in military circles there is much interest felt as to how the President will "work through." Gen. Marcy, Chief of Staff to General McClellan, was in the Department to- day, and had long separate interviews with the President Secretary Stanton and Gen. Halleck. First case under Lincoln's proclamation. The following paragraph is from the Washington correspondence of the New York Times: Vincent R. Jackson, of the Post Office Department has been again arrested, after having been released on security. He is to be tried under the provisions of the President's into proclamation — m
e letter adds; The rebel partisan, Morgan, has performed deeds which rival Stuart's raid into Pennsylvania. He has trotted round Buell as Stuart did around McClellan. He made a dash into Lexington drove out our forces into Merciless then round the Kentucky river to Lawrenceburg, and swept. on to Bards town. At Cox Creek he came upon a wagon train and burned eighty one wagon, taking the teamsters and guards prisoners. Thirty of the wagons were empty, the others laden with supplies for Wood's division. Pushing on toward Bardstown, he captured another large train and burned it, and when last heard from was pushing Southwest, evidently to destroy the Lebanon Branch Railroad and then to push on towards Munfordsville and destroy the Nashville Railroad--all of which he will undoubtedly accomplish. The train dust last night from Munfordsville is not in. Probably it is destroyed. He has a force of twelve hundred cavalry. Gen. Dumont is following but Morgan changes horses continu
e main part of his army in the same direction. Gen. Negley is there with about five thousand men. A sketch of Buell as a Strategist. The unhappy Buell, who did notbag Bragg, as we were repeatedly assured by the Western papers he would do; and who has been "relieved" for the failure, gets the following sketch from a letter in the Boston Journal. It is disheartening to see a noble cause go by default through ignorance, imbecility or treason, of those in command. Last spring Gen. Mitchell was at Chattanooga. within twenty-five miles of the great Eastern Railroad connecting the Gulf States with Richmond. He was desirous of pouncing upon it but was restrained by Buell. All through the summer Buell was in striking distance of that railroad, with a powerful army, but he has done nothing. The rebel surplice, the rebel troops, have passed East and West, the main rebel artery has circulated its life, blood, and he has made no effort to put in the latest. He remained asleep,
S. Finances (search for this): article 11
paper a most solemn recommendation — though he supposed it was a joke — that the ex-Mayor of this city and Horace Greeley should be sent to Fort Lafayette, and that they should play back gammon together — it struck him that it might have been batter said black-gammon. Not that he would insinuate that the honorable gentlemen had been, back gammoning the blacks. Mr. James closed with an earnest appeal for them never to allow encroachments upon the Constitution. An english view of u. S. Finances. The London Economistsays that when the great events of the last eighteen months are patiently and coolly examined by some Transatlantic historian who is anxious to explain the calamities of his country, it will be found that badly as the military affairs of the Federal Government have been managed — badly and corruptly as their civil administration has been managed, too — their financial administration has been managed worst of all. It adds: In this most important instrument
a short distance on Friday, and practiced firing up the river. Captain Turner handles her skillfully, and brings her about with wonderful ease and celerity. The Galena has remained at her present moorings ever since her attack on Fort Darling last rummer. She bears fearful witness to the overwhelming superiority of the rebel position during the engagement. Several shots are fixed in her hull; some penetrated her iron plated sides, and one or two made clean holes through the funnel. Captain Rogers is a fighting man, and is all ready for Merrimac No. 2, or any other rebel demonstration. The Miami (side wheel gunboat) is on picket duty for the present. and will probably be ordered home before long for repairs, as she needs a thorough overhauling. She came here from the Western Gulf squadron, where she rendered important service in the capture of the forts below New Orleans and at Vicksburg. The Monitor will return in a few days from Washington. Every day flags of truce pass
Horace Greeley (search for this): article 11
nths." "What did you go there for?" "I don't know; I was arrested by telegraph." [Laughter.] "How did you get out?" I don't know I got out by telegraph," [Laughter.] "Where are you going now?" "I don't know! I suppose they will give me a little change, and I will go to Fort Lafayette" [Laughter.] There was but one step from the sublime to the ridientons. When he had read in a city paper a most solemn recommendation — though he supposed it was a joke — that the ex-Mayor of this city and Horace Greeley should be sent to Fort Lafayette, and that they should play back gammon together — it struck him that it might have been batter said black-gammon. Not that he would insinuate that the honorable gentlemen had been, back gammoning the blacks. Mr. James closed with an earnest appeal for them never to allow encroachments upon the Constitution. An english view of u. S. Finances. The London Economistsays that when the great events of the last eighteen months are patiently and cooll<
re by the conductor, and would not get out unless so offered by the conductor. Downey than commanded him to sit elsewhere, as he would not ride in company with a negro, and threatened violence if he did not move. Saunders refused to move. Downey insisted. when the negro peined to his master's sword, which he carried, and told Downey that he was prepared to defend himself; whereupon Downey drew a knife and stabbed Saunders in the threat, the blood gushing freely. By that time a crowed Downey drew a knife and stabbed Saunders in the threat, the blood gushing freely. By that time a crowed had attracted by the noise. Downey was arrested and taken before Alderman Kline, where, I believe, the above facts were elicited. Saunders was taken to the residencDowney was arrested and taken before Alderman Kline, where, I believe, the above facts were elicited. Saunders was taken to the residence of a physician, where he lies in a critical condition, his life being despaired of. Downey is now in prison. committed for a hearing in the Dauphin County Court. Downey is now in prison. committed for a hearing in the Dauphin County Court. He is dressed in plan, coarse clothing, and has the looks of a rough Western of Southern man, and I understand is from Baltimore, some say New York. A Yankee Ab
prisoners with a little more humanity than heretofore. Old Abe to "run the machine" by himself. The Washington correspondent of the New York Times. is responsible for the following: The announcement that Secretary Stanton and Gen. Halleck refer all matters relating to the army of the Potomac to the President, who has relieved them of responsibility in the matter, and himself undertaken to "run the machine," has created deep excitement. Inquiries made show the facts to be as stry circles there is much interest felt as to how the President will "work through." Gen. Marcy, Chief of Staff to General McClellan, was in the Department to- day, and had long separate interviews with the President Secretary Stanton and Gen. Halleck. First case under Lincoln's proclamation. The following paragraph is from the Washington correspondence of the New York Times: Vincent R. Jackson, of the Post Office Department has been again arrested, after having been release
he result of a failure. The letter acknowledges that Bragg took over 4,000 wagons of provisions away with him, and the Federal only succeeded in recapturing forty. The letter adds; The rebel partisan, Morgan, has performed deeds which rival Stuart's raid into Pennsylvania. He has trotted round Buell as Stuart did around McClellan. He made a dash into Lexington drove out our forces into Merciless then round the Kentucky river to Lawrenceburg, and swept. on to Bards town. At Cox Creek heStuart did around McClellan. He made a dash into Lexington drove out our forces into Merciless then round the Kentucky river to Lawrenceburg, and swept. on to Bards town. At Cox Creek he came upon a wagon train and burned eighty one wagon, taking the teamsters and guards prisoners. Thirty of the wagons were empty, the others laden with supplies for Wood's division. Pushing on toward Bardstown, he captured another large train and burned it, and when last heard from was pushing Southwest, evidently to destroy the Lebanon Branch Railroad and then to push on towards Munfordsville and destroy the Nashville Railroad--all of which he will undoubtedly accomplish. The train dust l
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