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Edwin James (search for this): article 11
ion authorizes but what is necessary to be done to make of thirty-four States and main territory one nation. An Englishman on the telegraph Autocrat. Mr. Edwin James, late Queen's Court whose speech in a Democratic meeting at New York we have noticed said something more than we copied. He said: The two great questiotelegraph, and without authority — it was things like these that destroyed every notion which a European had of liberty in the United States. I was amused, said Mr. James, in continuing, when, the other day, a gentleman came to me — he was a client, and as I do not get many of them at present I remember him very well — and said, "— it struck him that it might have been batter said black-gammon. Not that he would insinuate that the honorable gentlemen had been, back gammoning the blacks. Mr. James closed with an earnest appeal for them never to allow encroachments upon the Constitution. An english view of u. S. Finances. The London Economistsays
From the North. We continue our extracts from our Northern files of the 28th inst., Those given below are of interest The last Raids of Morgan — Difficulty in Catching him. A letter, dated Cincinnati, the 21st ult., says that Buell, with his grand army, 140,000 strong, was returning to Louisville, and receiving all the abuse which is the result of a failure. The letter acknowledges that Bragg took over 4,000 wagons of provisions away with him, and the Federal only succeeded in recapturing forty. The letter adds; The rebel partisan, Morgan, has performed deeds which rival Stuart's raid into Pennsylvania. He has trotted round Buell as Stuart did around McClellan. He made a dash into Lexington drove out our forces into Merciless then round the Kentucky river to Lawrenceburg, and swept. on to Bards town. At Cox Creek he came upon a wagon train and burned eighty one wagon, taking the teamsters and guards prisoners. Thirty of the wagons were empty, the others laden
tion to the Confederate authorities. The case is one of interest, being the first under the late proclamation, and will furnish a precedent. --Now, that the President has made civilians liable to trail in this way, Major Dester, Provost Marshal, is most energetic in his dealing with suspected parsons, and no distinction or favor is show into any one because he may hold a place in any of the Departments of the Government. The English cotton Faming. --The London Daily News of the 6th instant, has the following important article, showing that the English cotton manufacturers will soon be able to procure a supply of the staple independently of the American growers: The day was sure to arrive when the general inability to believe in a supply of cotton from other sources than the American cotton States must give way before the facts. That day seems to be near at band. At the end of last week the cargoes from India began to arrive. Upwards of 10,000 bales from Bombay came
he facts. That day seems to be near at band. At the end of last week the cargoes from India began to arrive. Upwards of 10,000 bales from Bombay came in during three days, and the quantity from that port actually at sea and at Liverpool was found to be about 397,000 bales; so that Mr. Villers, whose promises were held to be trash when he spoke of 400,000 bales appears to be fully justified in the hopefulness of his tone. The next disclosures was that we have a prospect of a supply, in 1863, of 1,630,000 out of the 4,000,000, which is the largest quantity desired at the ordinary rate of prices. This amount will be just double the quantity used per week for the last three months; and thus it would seem that the worst must be past. At the recent high prices the weekly average taken by the trade has been 15,273 and the promised supply, independent of any change in American affairs, will yield 31,346 bates per week. The sources of this supply are India, the Brazil, Egypt, Turkey,
From the North. We continue our extracts from our Northern files of the 28th inst., Those given below are of interest The last Raids of Morgan — Difficulty in Catching him. A letter, dated Cincinnati, the 21st ult., says that Buell, with his grand army, 140,000 strong, was returning to Louisville, and receiving all the abuse which is the result of a failure. The letter acknowledges that Bragg took over 4,000 wagons of provisions away with him, and the Federal only succeeded in recapturing forty. The letter adds; The rebel partisan, Morgan, has performed deeds which rival Stuart's raid into Pennsylvania. He has trotted round Buell as Stuart did around McClellan. He made a dash into Lexington drove out our forces into Merciless then round the Kentucky river to Lawrenceburg, and swept. on to Bards town. At Cox Creek he came upon a wagon train and burned eighty one wagon, taking the teamsters and guards prisoners. Thirty of the wagons were empty, the others laden w
ing and humiliating. This war is a stern, a terrible reality, and it is best for all to see things just as they are. if Gen. Buell has anything to say in extenuation of his course let him by all means be heard. He has been in command of the army of the Ohio about twelve months. He has had opportunities of doing great things. The people can draw their own conclusions at to what he has accomplished. The Irrepressible Conflict in the Cars. An affair occurred in Harrisburg, Pa. on the 27th, which shows that the proclamation is the cause of "airs" upon the past of the "man and brother" at the North rather than else where. A letter to the Philadelphia Inquirersays: It seems that Jacob Saunders, a colored servant of Colonel Hiddir, got aboard the cars for Philadelphia, and was instructs by the conductor to take a seat in the front car. Soon after a white man whose name was subsequently ascertained to be Do whey, entered and addressing the negro, said,"Get out of this, you--
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