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Bombay (Maharashtra, India) (search for this): article 11
he 6th instant, has the following important article, showing that the English cotton manufacturers will soon be able to procure a supply of the staple independently of the American growers: The day was sure to arrive when the general inability to believe in a supply of cotton from other sources than the American cotton States must give way before the facts. That day seems to be near at band. At the end of last week the cargoes from India began to arrive. Upwards of 10,000 bales from Bombay came in during three days, and the quantity from that port actually at sea and at Liverpool was found to be about 397,000 bales; so that Mr. Villers, whose promises were held to be trash when he spoke of 400,000 bales appears to be fully justified in the hopefulness of his tone. The next disclosures was that we have a prospect of a supply, in 1863, of 1,630,000 out of the 4,000,000, which is the largest quantity desired at the ordinary rate of prices. This amount will be just double th
Perryville (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 11
ed asleep, while Bragg jumped into the ring captured Munfordsville, and begun his ravages of Kentucky. Instead of moving boldly to attack Bragg with a superior force, he avoided him, and moved on the are of a circle, while Bragg moved along the cord, in a race Northward. Having headed Bragg off as a boy heads off a flock of sheep browsing by the way, and having had his army increased to twice the size of Bragg's, he commences to drive him out. He permits Me- Cook to be overpowered at Perryville, when School is close at hand waiting orders to join in the fight. He moves upon the retreating Bragg with no hope of over raking him. He leaves Nashville exposed. He gives up the pursuit, and is now returning North with a disappointed dispirited army. Such is the record. It is painful to write it. Shall I retrain from giving facts? I cannot alter them. It is not my intention to write fiction, neither is it my purpose to withhold truth, although it may be mortifying and humiliating.
United States (United States) (search for this): article 11
the proprietors are setting heartily to work to procure the requisite labor, which may probably be supplied from the United States. Agricultural machinery of the highest order has been sent out to Porto Rico, which is expected to supply a large quore the old state of affairs. The Military Dictatorship. That Lincoln is to be the Military Dictator of the United States, and that very soon, seems to be conceded by the press of that country. The plan is clearly developed in the followire only waste paper. They appear to have very little idea of what the Commander in-Chief of the Army and Navy of the United States can do. A man of firm and into will, with a million of men in arms to support him, can do pretty much what he please, and without authority — it was things like these that destroyed every notion which a European had of liberty in the United States. I was amused, said Mr. James, in continuing, when, the other day, a gentleman came to me — he was a client, and as
Kentucky River (Kentucky, United States) (search for this): article 11
ng, was returning to Louisville, and receiving all the abuse which is the result of a failure. The letter acknowledges that Bragg took over 4,000 wagons of provisions away with him, and the Federal only succeeded in recapturing forty. The letter adds; The rebel partisan, Morgan, has performed deeds which rival Stuart's raid into Pennsylvania. He has trotted round Buell as Stuart did around McClellan. He made a dash into Lexington drove out our forces into Merciless then round the Kentucky river to Lawrenceburg, and swept. on to Bards town. At Cox Creek he came upon a wagon train and burned eighty one wagon, taking the teamsters and guards prisoners. Thirty of the wagons were empty, the others laden with supplies for Wood's division. Pushing on toward Bardstown, he captured another large train and burned it, and when last heard from was pushing Southwest, evidently to destroy the Lebanon Branch Railroad and then to push on towards Munfordsville and destroy the Nashville Rail
Minnesota (Minnesota, United States) (search for this): article 11
ar" Affairs in Hampton Roads. Newport News has been converted into a hospital station by the Federal, and the old water battery dismantled. The Cumberland, which was sunk by the Merrimac, is to be raised. A letter to the Boston JournalSays: The fleet lying in James river consists of the Minnesota, (flag ship of Act. Rear Admiral Lee,) New Ironsides, Galena, and Miami. The Genesee and Mahaska have been withdrawn, and other gun- boats are expected to take their places. The Minnesota rails to any for Boston, where it is understood some changes will be made in her armament. The New Ironsides presents a formidable appearance at her moorings. She has proved herself, contrary to general expectation an excellent sea boat, and in action will undoubtedly be a splendid success. She steamed around a short distance on Friday, and practiced firing up the river. Captain Turner handles her skillfully, and brings her about with wonderful ease and celerity. The Galena has remain
Hampton Roads (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 11
. Will the conservative part of the North not rise en masse against this subversion of that character of its liberties and only bond of its existence as a Government, though proclaimed under the delusive idea of sustaining it? The effect on the South can only be to make them more and more desperate in their resistance, and to enable their leaders to say: "Now you see we were right as to the intentions of the Lincoln Government when we induced you to began this war" Affairs in Hampton Roads. Newport News has been converted into a hospital station by the Federal, and the old water battery dismantled. The Cumberland, which was sunk by the Merrimac, is to be raised. A letter to the Boston JournalSays: The fleet lying in James river consists of the Minnesota, (flag ship of Act. Rear Admiral Lee,) New Ironsides, Galena, and Miami. The Genesee and Mahaska have been withdrawn, and other gun- boats are expected to take their places. The Minnesota rails to any for Bost
e Brazil, Egypt, Turkey, Greece, Italy chance car goes from America, and "other sources" These "other sources" are credited with only 25,000. Considering that the West Indies are included under this head, it is reasonable to hope that the supply may turn out to have been underrated even for the coming season. The reports from Jamaica are in the night of degree encouraging, both as to the flourishing condition of the growing crop and the rapid increase of the area devoted to cotton. In Guiana and the proprietors are setting heartily to work to procure the requisite labor, which may probably be supplied from the United States. Agricultural machinery of the highest order has been sent out to Porto Rico, which is expected to supply a large quantity, not less than the produce of 2,000 acres, next year and the quality of the West India cotton is declared to be scarcely short of the highest rated of American. Already we see that as time passes on, we find ourselves under the process
Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania, United States) (search for this): article 11
The last Raids of Morgan — Difficulty in Catching him. A letter, dated Cincinnati, the 21st ult., says that Buell, with his grand army, 140,000 strong, was returning to Louisville, and receiving all the abuse which is the result of a failure. The letter acknowledges that Bragg took over 4,000 wagons of provisions away with him, and the Federal only succeeded in recapturing forty. The letter adds; The rebel partisan, Morgan, has performed deeds which rival Stuart's raid into Pennsylvania. He has trotted round Buell as Stuart did around McClellan. He made a dash into Lexington drove out our forces into Merciless then round the Kentucky river to Lawrenceburg, and swept. on to Bards town. At Cox Creek he came upon a wagon train and burned eighty one wagon, taking the teamsters and guards prisoners. Thirty of the wagons were empty, the others laden with supplies for Wood's division. Pushing on toward Bardstown, he captured another large train and burned it, and when las
Bull Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) (search for this): article 11
k. First case under Lincoln's proclamation. The following paragraph is from the Washington correspondence of the New York Times: Vincent R. Jackson, of the Post Office Department has been again arrested, after having been released on security. He is to be tried under the provisions of the President's into proclamation — making civilians triable by course martial — before the court martial now in session in Pennsylvania avenue. Jackson was one of the Union nurses captured at Bull Run, and while in Richmond gave information to the Confederate authorities. The case is one of interest, being the first under the late proclamation, and will furnish a precedent. --Now, that the President has made civilians liable to trail in this way, Major Dester, Provost Marshal, is most energetic in his dealing with suspected parsons, and no distinction or favor is show into any one because he may hold a place in any of the Departments of the Government. The English cotton Faming.
Turquie (Turkey) (search for this): article 11
n 1863, of 1,630,000 out of the 4,000,000, which is the largest quantity desired at the ordinary rate of prices. This amount will be just double the quantity used per week for the last three months; and thus it would seem that the worst must be past. At the recent high prices the weekly average taken by the trade has been 15,273 and the promised supply, independent of any change in American affairs, will yield 31,346 bates per week. The sources of this supply are India, the Brazil, Egypt, Turkey, Greece, Italy chance car goes from America, and "other sources" These "other sources" are credited with only 25,000. Considering that the West Indies are included under this head, it is reasonable to hope that the supply may turn out to have been underrated even for the coming season. The reports from Jamaica are in the night of degree encouraging, both as to the flourishing condition of the growing crop and the rapid increase of the area devoted to cotton. In Guiana and the propriet
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