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Browsing named entities in a specific section of The Daily Dispatch: November 7, 1862., [Electronic resource]. Search the whole document.

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South Carolina (South Carolina, United States) (search for this): article 9
, in addition to one hundred already employed by the Treasury Department, are about to be appointed, to number, sign, register, divide, and clip the small notes, (the ones and twos,) of which myriads almost are already in circulation. It may not be generally known, but it is a fact that will be interesting to some readers, that the $1 and $2 bills of the Confederate States--those which are embellished with badly engraved likenesses of Secretary Benjamin, and Mrs. Governor Pickens of South Carolina--are all signed by young ladies, of whom many are beautiful and accomplished girls, ornaments of the society of the Capital. Each clerk is required to sign two thousand notes a day. The salary of these gentle employees is $600 per annum; but will soon he raised fifty per cent. Mr. Memminger, in making appointments in the female bureau, has been very properly guided, other things being equal, such as fitness and responsibility, by the need and circumstances of the applicants, recognizing
Grenada (Mississippi, United States) (search for this): article 9
The issue of Treasury notes. --The Richmond correspondent of the Grenada (Miss.) Appeal sends that paper the following items: By the way, I have just heard two facts mentioned, which would seem to show that no pause in the utterance of Treasury notes is contemplated by that officer. A gentleman tells me that a contract is pending between the Government and the Richmond Paper Mill for a hundred and fifty thousand dollars' worth of bank note paper, on which to print new fives, tens, fifties, and one hundreds; and I am informed that fifty new female clerks, in addition to one hundred already employed by the Treasury Department, are about to be appointed, to number, sign, register, divide, and clip the small notes, (the ones and twos,) of which myriads almost are already in circulation. It may not be generally known, but it is a fact that will be interesting to some readers, that the $1 and $2 bills of the Confederate States--those which are embellished with badly engrave
United States (United States) (search for this): article 9
of bank note paper, on which to print new fives, tens, fifties, and one hundreds; and I am informed that fifty new female clerks, in addition to one hundred already employed by the Treasury Department, are about to be appointed, to number, sign, register, divide, and clip the small notes, (the ones and twos,) of which myriads almost are already in circulation. It may not be generally known, but it is a fact that will be interesting to some readers, that the $1 and $2 bills of the Confederate States--those which are embellished with badly engraved likenesses of Secretary Benjamin, and Mrs. Governor Pickens of South Carolina--are all signed by young ladies, of whom many are beautiful and accomplished girls, ornaments of the society of the Capital. Each clerk is required to sign two thousand notes a day. The salary of these gentle employees is $600 per annum; but will soon he raised fifty per cent. Mr. Memminger, in making appointments in the female bureau, has been very properly g
fty new female clerks, in addition to one hundred already employed by the Treasury Department, are about to be appointed, to number, sign, register, divide, and clip the small notes, (the ones and twos,) of which myriads almost are already in circulation. It may not be generally known, but it is a fact that will be interesting to some readers, that the $1 and $2 bills of the Confederate States--those which are embellished with badly engraved likenesses of Secretary Benjamin, and Mrs. Governor Pickens of South Carolina--are all signed by young ladies, of whom many are beautiful and accomplished girls, ornaments of the society of the Capital. Each clerk is required to sign two thousand notes a day. The salary of these gentle employees is $600 per annum; but will soon he raised fifty per cent. Mr. Memminger, in making appointments in the female bureau, has been very properly guided, other things being equal, such as fitness and responsibility, by the need and circumstances of the a
and I am informed that fifty new female clerks, in addition to one hundred already employed by the Treasury Department, are about to be appointed, to number, sign, register, divide, and clip the small notes, (the ones and twos,) of which myriads almost are already in circulation. It may not be generally known, but it is a fact that will be interesting to some readers, that the $1 and $2 bills of the Confederate States--those which are embellished with badly engraved likenesses of Secretary Benjamin, and Mrs. Governor Pickens of South Carolina--are all signed by young ladies, of whom many are beautiful and accomplished girls, ornaments of the society of the Capital. Each clerk is required to sign two thousand notes a day. The salary of these gentle employees is $600 per annum; but will soon he raised fifty per cent. Mr. Memminger, in making appointments in the female bureau, has been very properly guided, other things being equal, such as fitness and responsibility, by the need a
Memminger (search for this): article 9
r, divide, and clip the small notes, (the ones and twos,) of which myriads almost are already in circulation. It may not be generally known, but it is a fact that will be interesting to some readers, that the $1 and $2 bills of the Confederate States--those which are embellished with badly engraved likenesses of Secretary Benjamin, and Mrs. Governor Pickens of South Carolina--are all signed by young ladies, of whom many are beautiful and accomplished girls, ornaments of the society of the Capital. Each clerk is required to sign two thousand notes a day. The salary of these gentle employees is $600 per annum; but will soon he raised fifty per cent. Mr. Memminger, in making appointments in the female bureau, has been very properly guided, other things being equal, such as fitness and responsibility, by the need and circumstances of the applicants, recognizing in the young widows or the orphaned children of soldiers killed upon the battlefield a peculiar claim upon his attention.